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Olympic documentaries highlight Peacock streaming content

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Ryan Lochte, the 2008 Olympic 4x100m freestyle relay and a new group of the world’s fastest sprinters are subjects of Olympic sports documentaries slated for Peacock, NBC’s free premium ad-supported streaming service with subscription tiers.

The docs are among expected programming on Peacock Premium, bundled at no additional cost to 24 million Comcast and Cox subscribers and $4.99 per month for non-bundled customers.

Peacock Premium launches April 15 for Xfinity X1 and Flex customers. On July 15, Peacock Free and Peacock Premium will be available nationally, a week before the Tokyo Olympics.

Peacock will have live coverage of the Tokyo Olympic Opening Ceremony on July 24, before it airs on primetime. Same with the Closing Ceremony on Aug. 9. Plus three daily shows, via NBCUniversal PR:

“Tokyo Live,” a five-hour live morning studio show during Tokyo primetime with live coverage of major events, plus medal ceremonies, engaging segments with athlete profiles, and real-time analysis.

“Tokyo Daily Digest,” an hour-long highlight show with the best and buzziest moments, athlete interviews, features and more of the day’s most exciting events.

“Tokyo Tonight,” a nightly live studio show with quick turnaround highlights, in addition to medal ceremonies, features, interviews, and primetime previews.

Peacock will then stream more than 1,000 exclusive hours of the Paralympics that open Aug. 25. Following the Games, Peacock will add Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA.

The Olympics-related documentaries on tap, via NBCUniversal PR:

“Dream Team 2020”
Follow USA Basketball’s top superstars on their journey to Tokyo in this exclusive, behind-the-scenes documentary series produced in partnership with NBA Entertainment. We’ll take you inside the 2020 Dream Team’s training camp, exhibition games and preparation for the 2020 Olympics, where Team USA is expected to make another gold-medal run.

“Hot Water: In Deep with Ryan Lochte”
At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Ryan Lochte was at the center of a scandal that has since overshadowed his long and decorated swimming career. Now a 35-year-old husband and father of two young children, Lochte is hoping for one more chance to make Team USA, and prove he’s not the same man he was four years ago. 

“United States of Speed”
From Jesse Owens to Carl Lewis to Maurice Greene, there is a proud tradition of sprinting success in the United States. However in recent years, Jamaica’s Usain Bolt has been unbeatable at the Olympics. Now that the fastest man of all time has retired, meet the Americans who aim to put Team USA back on top in the sprints. 

“Run Through the Line”

Nike founder Phil Knight and his friends take viewers through the creation of his world-renowned company and the ambitions he still chases at 81 years young. Based loosely on Knight’s best-selling memoir, “Shoe Dog.”

“The Greatest Race”

You probably remember where you were when you saw it. Michael Phelps and his teammates had fallen hopelessly behind race favorite France in the 4x100m freestyle relay at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. In the final leg, 32-year-old American Jason Lezak was losing ground to Alain Bernard, the 100m free world-record holder and anchor of the seemingly unbeatable French team. Then the impossible happened. Hear from the swimmers on both sides of the epic relay as we revisit The Greatest Race.

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Eddy Alvarez, Olympic short track medalist, to play for Miami Marlins

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Eddy Alvarez realized his MLB dream, six years after earning a Winter Olympic medal, and during a global pandemic that affected his club more than any other U.S. professional sports franchise.

Alvarez, a 2014 U.S. Olympic short track speed skating medalist, is being added to the Miami Marlins roster for Tuesday’s restart of their abbreviated season, president of baseball operations Mike Hill said Monday, according to Marlins beat reporters.

The 30-year-old was among a group added after as many as 18 Marlins tested positive for the coronavirus last week, forcing the club to cancel seven games.

Alvarez is believed to be the first U.S. Winter Olympian to become a Major League Baseball player.

He may be the second Olympic medalist in a sport other than baseball to make it to the majors, joining Jim Thorpe. (Michael Jordan tried to do so with the Chicago White Sox, playing Double-A in 1994, but returned to the Chicago Bulls in 1995.)

Alvarez, a Miami native, played baseball in high school and at Salt Lake Community College before focusing on short track in 2012 for a 2014 Olympic run.

He came back from missing the 2010 Olympic team and surgeries on both knees, reportedly leaving him immobile and bedpan dependent for four to six weeks, to make the Sochi Winter Games. Eddy the Jet earned a silver medal in the 5000m relay.

Then Alvarez returned to baseball after three years away. He signed a minor-league contract with the Chicago White Sox in June 2014. He worked his way through the minors between that franchise and the Marlins system.

Alvarez was a Kannapolis Intimidator, a New Orleans Baby Cake and a Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp.

Now, he’s a big leaguer.

“It definitely was a chance, picking up a kid who hasn’t played in three years who is starting at the age of 24,” Alvarez said in 2014. “It’s not your typical story, but I play like a 17-year-old kid. I’m running around everywhere. I’m diving around everywhere. I’m full of life. I definitely see my progression moving at a rapid pace.”

MORE: What Olympic baseball, softball return looks like in 2021

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Katie Ledecky balances glass of chocolate milk on her head while swimming

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Katie Ledecky will always remember Aug. 3 as the date she won her first Olympic gold medal, at age 15 in 2012.

Now, she can also associate it with the time she created another kind of buzz on social media.

The five-time Olympic champion posted video of her swimming the length of a pool while balancing a glass of chocolate milk on her head. Barely any, if any, milk spilled into the pool.

Ledecky swam as part of a new got milk? ad campaign.

“Hoooowww nervous were you when you did this?!” fellow Olympic champion and training partner Simone Manuel asked Ledecky on Instagram.

“I have never braced my core so hard,” Ledecky wrote. “It’s a great drill!”

“Try doing it breaststroke,” British Olympic 100m breaststroke champion and world-record holder Adam Peaty wrote.

“Is it wrong of me to think this is even more impressive than a few of your WR’s?!!!” wrote 1992 Olympic champion Summer Sanders.

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