Roger Federer vs. Novak Djokovic in Australian Open semifinal: How to watch

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The 2020 Australian Open will have its biggest showdown in the classic rivalry between Roger Federer and defending champion Novak Djokovic on Thursday night. The two tennis stars face off in the Semifinals for a shot at another major title and a record prize of $4.12 million. Here is what to know and how to tune in for another chapter in the Federer vs. Djokovic rivalry.

When is the match?

The match is set to begin on Thursday, January 30 at 7:00 p.m. ET.

How can I watch the Australian Open Semifinals?

If you are watching in the US, Federer vs. Djokovic will be broadcast by ESPN and the Tennis Channel. Those with access can enjoy it on TV as part of their usual subscription package.

For those looking to stream, the network’s subscription service ESPN+ will carry the match.

Here are some listings around the globe:

  • Africa: BeIN Sports, EuroSport, SuperSport
  • Asia Pacific & Oceania: ESPN, Fox Sports, Nine, BTV, CCTV, FBC, SINA, GDTV, QIY, NHK, Sky Sports, Sony Six, W_O_W_O_W
  • Canada: TSN, RDS
  • Central Asia: EuroSport, Sony Six
  • Europe: EuroSport, ServusTV
  • Latin America & Caribbean: ESPN
  • Middle East: BeIN Sports, EuroSport
  • United States: ESPN and ESPN2, ESPN+, ESPN3 and Tennis Channel

Where is it being played? 

The Australian Open is held in Melbourne, Australia and played at Melbourne Park on a hard surface court.

How much are tickets?

The cheapest ticket for the Australian Open Semifinals Night is currently going for $431.85 at Stubhub, with the most expensive going for $1,446.74.

What road did each player take to get to the Semifinals?

Federer: In the opening round, the Swiss tennis star and No. 3 seed took down American Steve Johnson in three sets. Federer did the same to Filip Krajinovic in the second round, but was pushed to five sets against John Millman in the third round and four sets against Marton Fucsovics in the fourth. Closing out his journey to the Semifinals, Federer took down American Tennys Sandgren in four sets on Monday, January 27.

Djokovic: The Serbian and No. 2 seed in the tournament took a slightly different route than Federer, playing Jan-Lennard Struff to five sets in the first round, but sweeping each of his four remaining competitors to reach the Semifinals.

Who will the winner play in the Finals?

Possibly Dominic Thiem, who upset top seed Rafael Nadal in a four-hour, 10-minute match, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4), 4-6, 7-6 (6). Or it will be Thiem’s semifinal opponent, Alexander Zverev.

What is the head-to-head record between Federer and Djokovic?

Djokovic currently holds the lead against Federer with a record of 26-23. Federer won the previous match between the two at the 2019 ATP Finals tournament, but Djokovic bested Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon Finals and has won 9 of the last 12 against the Swiss legend, dating back to 2015. 

Does Federer or Djokovic have more majors wins?

Federer holds the record for most major singles titles for a male at 20. Djokovic, the 2019 Australian Open champion, is not far behind Federer with 16 major titles.

How many Australian Open titles have Federer and Djokovic won?

Djokovic holds the record with seven Australian Open titles, but Federer is one off of that mark with six.

Australian bush fires

Melbourne hasn’t been as badly affected as Canberra or Sydney by the fires, however, thanks to changing winds air pollution shot up to “hazardous” levels in the week running up to the event.

While the tournament is proceeding as scheduled, umpires have been told to stop play if air monitoring shows it is too dangerous to continue.

Kaillie Humphries begins trek to 2026 Winter Olympics with monobob World Cup win

Kaillie Humphries
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Kaillie Humphries is off to a strong start to a four-year cycle that she hopes ends with her breaking the record as the oldest female Olympic bobsledder.

Humphries, the women’s record holder with three Olympic bobsled titles, earned her first World Cup victory since February’s Winter Games, taking a monobob in Park City, Utah, on Friday.

Humphries, the first Olympic monobob champion, prevailed by .31 of a second over German Lisa Buckwitz combining times from two runs at the 2002 Olympic track.

Humphries has said since February’s Olympics that she planned to take time off in this four-year cycle to start a family, then return in time for the 2026 Milano-Cortina Winter Games. Humphries, who can become the first female Olympic bobsledder in her 40s, shared her experiences with IVF in the offseason on her social media.

“We’ve pushed pause so that I could go and compete this season, maintain my world ranking to be able to still work towards my 2026 goals, and we’ll go back in March to do the implantation of the embryos that we did retrieve,” she said, according to TeamUSA.org.

The next Games come 20 years after her first Olympic experience in Italy, which was a sad one. Humphries, then a bobsled push athlete, was part of the Canadian delegation at the 2006 Torino Games, marched at the Opening Ceremony and had her parents flown in to cheer her on.

But four days before the competition, Humphries learned she was not chosen for either of the two Canadian push athlete spots. She vowed on the flight home to put her future Olympic destiny in her own hands by becoming a driver.

She has since become the greatest female driver in history — Olympic golds in 2010, 2014 and 2022, plus five world championships.

Her longtime rival, five-time Olympic medalist Elana Meyers Taylor, plans to return to competition from her second childbirth later in this Olympic cycle and can also break the record of oldest female Olympic bobsledder.

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Rosie MacLennan, Olympic trampoline legend, retires

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Canadian Rosie MacLennan, the lone person to win two Olympic trampoline gold medals, announced her retirement at age 34.

“After 10 World Championships and 4 Olympic Games, it is time for me to hang up my shiny spandex,” she posted on social media. “Trampoline has been such an integral part of my life and sport will continue to be, even if my role in sport is changing. My experience as an athlete has exceeded even my wildest childhood dreams.”

MacLennan won Olympic titles in 2012 and 2016 in an event that debuted at the 2000 Sydney Games. She was fourth at her last Olympics in Tokyo. MacLennan, Canada’s flag bearer at the 2016 Olympic Opening Ceremony, also earned world titles in 2013 and 2018 among seven world medals overall.

MacLennan came back from two concussions in 2015 — over-rotating a jump in training and later when she was accidentally hit on the head by a car trunk — to win her second Olympic title. She came back from an April 2019 broken ankle to reach her fourth Olympics.

MacLennan, who qualified for her first world age group competition at age 11, spent more than 26 years in the sport.

NBC Olympic research contributed to this report.

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