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In figure skating, a radical proposal to reshape the sport

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In an attempt to rebalance the athletic and artistic sides of figure skating, the sport’s technical committee for singles and pairs is submitting a proposal with sweeping changes for consideration by the International Skating Union at its biennial congress this June in Thailand.

The proposal comes at a moment when the jump revolutions in men’s and women’s singles skating have created a huge competitive imbalance in favor of skaters doing the most difficult jumps – quadruples for men, quads and triple Axels for women.

The proposal will not be made public until April, when the 2020 congress agenda is published. But Fabio Bianchetti of Italy, chair of the ISU singles and pairs technical committee, confirmed its essence and intent to NBCSports.com in emails.

This is the framework of the proposal, which will apply to singles and pairs, even though the imbalance in pairs is not as pronounced:

  • The technical and “artistic” (program component) marks, which now carry equal weight in the total score for both the short program and free skate, would be recalibrated.

In the short program, to be called a technical program, the technical element score would count 60 percent of the total, the program component scores, 40 percent.  In the free skate, it would be the reverse, with 60 percent for PCS.

  • Both programs would last three minutes, 30 seconds. Currently, the singles and pairs short program is 2 minutes, 40 seconds and the free skates four minutes, plus or minus 10 seconds for both. That would make the short program some 30 percent longer and the free skate 12.5 percent shorter.
  • The scores would, as now, be simply added together to get the final result.

But they would no longer include the big difference in available technical points between the short program, in which there now are seven elements, and the free, which has 12. A short program generally accounts for between 25 percent to 35 percent of a top singles skated’s score today.

If approved, which another top skating official thought was a “long shot,” the changes would take effect in the 2022-23 season.

The technical committee has, for now, shelved the idea of splitting events into two competitions, technical and free, with separate medals for each instead of an overall medal.

“In the future,” Bianchetti wrote, “we might propose to split the event into two totally separate events with two different medals but for the time being we want just to make a clear difference between the two programs.

“What is new are the different requirements, the different weight of the technical and components marks inside each section and the same weight of the two programs in the final results.”

Bianchetti declined to provide details of the proposal, such as which elements and how many elements would be included in each program or whether they would be scored the same way they are now. He noted the details of the proposal could be altered from their current incarnations before being published.

The fundamental idea behind it, he said, “is to push skaters to look for quality and not only for difficulty with much more time than today for transitions and choreographic moments.”

Even without knowing details, it is clear that achieving such an aim would almost certainly require some new restrictions on both the number of jumps allowed and also on the number of the high-scoring quadruple jumps allowed, especially since lengthening the short program obviously leaves time for more jumps than the current four. A free skate with fewer jumps would accentuate the higher percentage value of PCS.

The new format would be as fundamental a change to the sport’s status quo as the International Judging System was when implemented 16 years ago. The IJS was designed to make results less predictable than they had been in the old 6.0 system and, with seemingly a zillion numbers now in play for each score, make it harder to consummate back-room deals to influence results.

In a September 2017 interview with me, Bianchetti already had talked of a long-term plan to make “a radical change for the future development of the sport, hoping to bring back the popularity that figure skating used to have in the past.”

The first part of that plan, implemented in the 2018-19 season, included lowering the base values of quadruple jumps and, for pairs, quadruple throws.

Yet its intended effect on the sport’s balance has been minimized by the organic developments of the past two seasons, especially in women’s singles, where one young Russian after another has begun doing quadruple jumps or triple Axels in the free skate.

Those jumps are worth so much that it has become impossible for women without them to compete for medals at major events. And it would be even harder if women could do quads in the short program, which is why the technical committee has not made a proposal to allow that – even though one could come from a national federation.

It also has made it very difficult for consummate artists like Jason Brown, who never has landed a quad, to make global podiums in men’s events. Many of the sport’s longtime fans say they have lost interest in what they see as a jumping contest.

At this season’s Grand Prix Final and European Championships, three Russian first-year seniors, one 16 years old (Alena Kostornaia) and the others 15 (Anna Shcherbakova and Alexandra Trusova), not only swept the women’s podium but did it in a rout.

At the Grand Prix Final, the difference between the third and fourth place women was 16.71 points; at the European Championships, it was 32.46 points.

That gap may shrink over time as young skaters from other nations learn to master quads and triple Axels at the same age as the Russians, who have leapt ahead.

At present, though, women in their late teens and early 20s have fallen a generation behind. That includes skaters as talented as reigning Olympic champion Alina Zagitova of Russia, who, at 17, has taken a competitive break from a sport in which she lacked the jumps to be competitive with her younger compatriots.

And many within the sport fear for the long-term health of girls pushing themselves to learn quads while their growth plates have not fully fused. That has led to discussions of raising the age minimum for senior competition from its current 15.

A proposal to raise the age did not get enough support to even be debated at the last biennial ISU Congress. Since then, many leading Russian coaches have called for such a change.

Yet the Russia Figure Skating Federation may resist any attempts to endanger its new hegemony in women’s skating. It can likely call on enough allies to defeat proposals like the ones the technical committee has made.

Philip Hersh, who has covered figure skating at the last 11 Winter Olympics, is a special contributor to NBCSports.com/figure-skating.

MORE: Figure skaters plan 40-year anniversary celebrations in Lake Placid

As a reminder, you can watch the events from the 2019-20 figure skating season live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.

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Can T.J. Oshie, other established Olympic hockey stars hold on for 2022?

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T.J. Oshie will be 35 years old during the next Winter Olympics. Jonathan Quick will be 36. Now that the NHL is one key step closer to returning to the Winter Games, the question surfaces: which 2014 Olympians will have a difficult time returning to rosters in 2022?

Oshie was the last of the 14 forwards chosen for the U.S. Olympic team for Sochi, beating out Bobby Ryan and Brandon Saad, in part for his shootout prowess.

In group play against Russia, Oshie was memorably tapped by U.S. head coach Dan Bylsma six times in a shootout, including all five in the sudden-death rounds. Oshie beat Sergei Bobrovsky four times, including the game winner.

“After I went out for my third attempt, I figured I was going to keep going,” Oshie said, according to USA Hockey. “Each time I would look up to see what [Bylsma] had to say, and he would just give me a nod every time. I kind of started laughing toward shot five and six because it was getting kind of ridiculous.”

Oshie became known as “T.J. Sochi” on social media. President Barack Obama congratulated him on Twitter. The U.S. eventually lost to Canada in the semifinals and Finland in the bronze-medal game.

When the NHL chose not to send its players to the PyeongChang Winter Games, it may have spelled the end of Oshie’s Olympic career.

Consider that the oldest forward on the 2014 U.S. Olympic team was 29, six years younger than Oshie will be come 2022. A recent Olympic roster prediction from The Hockey Writers put Oshie in the “Just Missed Out” list.

NBC Sports NHL analyst Pierre McGuire has Oshie among the finalists for the last forward spots in his early U.S. roster prediction.

“I wouldn’t discount T.J. Oshie because shootout is still part of it,” McGuire said. “He still has his shootout moves, even though he’s not getting any younger.”

Quick, the unused third goalie in 2010, played 305 out of 365 minutes in net for the U.S. in Sochi. He was coming off a Stanley Cup in 2012 and en route to another one in 2014.

Since, he was sidelined by a knee injury that required surgery. He remains the Los Angeles Kings’ No. 1 goalie, which almost automatically puts an American in the Olympic roster discussion these days.

“Somebody like Jonathan definitely merits consideration just because of his achievement level over time, but I think he’d be the first person to tell you injuries have definitely affected him,” McGuire said of Quick, looking to become the second-oldest U.S. goalie to play in the Olympics after Tom Barrasso in 2002. “It’s not going to be easy for him.”

The U.S. could bypass Quick for three Olympic rookies in 2022. Connor Hellebuyck, John Gibson and Ben Bishop have superior save percentages and goals-against averages and more games played than Quick since the start of the 2018-19 season.

A wild card is Spencer Knight, the 19-year-old No. 1 from the world junior championships who last year became the highest-drafted goalie since 2010 (No. 13 to the Florida Panthers). Knight would break defenseman Bryan Berard‘s record as the youngest U.S. Olympic hockey player in the NHL era.

The Canadian roster has traditionally been deeper than the U.S. The talent is overwhelming at center, led by Sidney CrosbyConnor McDavidPatrice Bergeron and Nathan MacKinnon. The Canadians must get creative if the likes of veterans Jonathan Toews and John Tavares will join them in Beijing.

Toews, then 21, was the best forward at the 2010 Vancouver Games and Canada’s only one on the all-tournament team. While Toews’ last NHL All-Star selection was in 2017, his last two seasons have been his best in terms of points per game since 2011.

“The one thing that Canada is very good at, they do it extremely well, they select players that fit roles,” McGuire said, noting Mike Richards shifting to the wing during the 2010 Olympics. “When you look at the overwhelming depth that Canada has, that’s going to be the thing that’s going that’s going to be very interesting to watch to see how it plays out at center.”

MORE: NHL players vote on world’s best female hockey player

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NHL closer to Olympic hockey return for 2022, 2026

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The NHL just took a major step to returning to the Olympics in 2022 and 2026 after skipping the 2018 Winter Games.

The NHL and the NHL Players’ Association announced a collective bargaining agreement (CBA) that includes Olympic participation at the next two Winter Games in Beijing and Milan and Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy.

Should the NHL, the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) and the IOC agree, expect the world’s best players to compete for their nations during breaks in those NHL seasons.

Nine of the 12 nations have already qualified for the 2022 Olympic men’s hockey tournament. The groups and qualifiers are here.

The NHL participated in five straight Olympics from 1998-2014 before declining to pause its season for PyeongChang.

The 2018 Olympic men’s hockey rosters included players from every other major international league, led by Russia’s KHL, which made up the entire Olympic Athletes from Russia team that beat Germany in the final. The U.S. team included veterans in European leagues, the minor league AHL, collegians and captain Brian Gionta, a 2006 Olympian who had stepped away from the NHL.

In April 2017, the NHL announced it would not send its players to the 2018 Olympics due to a lack of concession from the IOC, IIHF or the NHLPA to entice owners and officials. At the time, the CBA did not include Olympic participation.

NHL commissioner Gary Bettman then cited “fatigue” among team owners about taking an Olympic break every four seasons. Owners mentioned the risk of having their stars get injured, away from their teams in the middle of their seasons. South Korea, with its 14-hour time difference from New York, was also not as enticing a Winter Olympic host as, say, Canada or Russia.

Other issues Bettman and other league and team officials expressed included a lack of exposure and benefit for the NHL, the league’s inability to use the Olympics for marketing due to sponsorship rules and money.

MORE: 2014 Olympic stars on the 2022 Olympic roster bubble

Before and after the PyeongChang Olympics, Bettman doubted that the NHL would return for the 2022 Beijing Winter Games.

“I don’t want to sound like a broken record on the subject, but I think going to the Olympics is a challenge for us,” Bettman said last November after meetings with the IIHF. “I know the players love representing their countries. I know that the players like going. I know that the players that don’t go like having a break in the middle of the season. But from our standpoint, we have found going to the Olympics to be incredibly disruptive to our season.

“For us, at best, it’s a mixed bag.”

Canada came to dominate Olympic men’s hockey in the NHL era, taking gold in 2002, 2010 and 2014. Sidney Crosby, gold medalist in 2010 and 2014, will be 34 years old come the 2022 Olympics.

Alex Ovechkin, a three-time Olympian for Russia with zero medals, will be 36 years old. Only two Russian male Olympic hockey players have been older: Igor Larionov in 2002 and Sergei Fedorov in 2010, according to Olympedia.org.

Younger stars Jack Eichel and Auston Matthews (USA), Nikita Kucherov and Andrei Vasilevskiy (Russia), Connor McDavid (Canada), David Pastrnak (Czech Republic) and Leon Draisaitl (Germany) could each play in their first Olympics in 2022.

MORE: NHL players vote on world’s best female hockey player

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