U.S. dedicates women’s team pursuit world title to Kelly Catlin

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With “KC” stickers on their bikes, the U.S. women’s team pursuit team took gold at the world track cycling championships. They did it in remembrance of former team member Kelly Catlin, who died by suicide last March.

“This one is super special,” said Chloe Dygert, who earned Rio Olympic silver on a team with Catlin. “This is our first world championships since Kelly. To win here, for her, it means a lot. It’s very emotional. We had her in our hearts this whole time.”

Dygert, Jennifer ValenteEmma White and Lily Williams clocked 4 minutes, 11.235 seconds to defeat Olympic champion Great Britain by nearly two seconds in the final in Berlin.

A new-look U.S. pursuit team is jelling at the right time, five months before the Olympics.

“This is an accomplishment, but we’re going to put it behind us,” said Dygert, knowing the U.S. has never won an Olympic women’s track cycling title. “We have way more to do. This is a stepping stone. Olympics is what matters. This is training, basically.”

The team pursuit is a 4000m event where heats have two teams positioned exactly opposite of each other on the track. Times are determined by a team’s third finisher.

The U.S. — world champion in 2016, 2017 and 2018 — dipped to seventh place in 2019 without key team members Catlin and Dygert.

“We don’t talk about it every day, but if there’s something going and it reminds us of Kelly, we’re not afraid to talk about it,” said Dygert, who missed part of 2019 after a May 2018 road cycling crash that caused a concussion. “Kelly, bring her up, there’s jokes, everything. Kelly’s here. Kelly’s with us all the time.”

The U.S. team that prevailed in Berlin included two newcomers in this Olympic cycle in Williams and White.

“I’m 25, and I’d like to think that I’m still young, yet somehow I’m the oldest on this new team,” said Valente, a mechanical engineering student at the University of Colorado. “Because of all the new faces, people don’t really know what were capable of, and we think that works to our advantage.”

White started riding track in March 2018 after experience in road cycling and cyclo-cross. She made her track worlds debut last year as part of the seventh-place U.S. team. The Americans clocked 4:23.721 in 2019, more than seven seconds slower than in the same round in 2018 and 12 seconds slower than the American record set in Wednesday’s qualifying round.

Williams, this year’s rookie team member, converted from being a mile runner at Vanderbilt.

“We do have great relationships on and off the bike, and that’s huge for this time around,” Dygert said. “I feel like before Rio, this environment wasn’t as healthy as it is now. And that’s definitely a game-changer.”

NBC Olympics senior researcher Rachel Thompson contributed to this report from Berlin.

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Noah Lyles raises black-gloved fist, wins 200m in Monaco

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Noah Lyles said he had plans going forward to make statements, beyond his rapid sprint times. He did that in Monaco on Friday.

Lyles raised a black, fingerless-gloved right fist before getting into the blocks to win a 200m in his first international race of the season, conjuring memories of the famous 1968 Olympic podium gesture.

He clocked 19.76 seconds, leading a one-two with younger brother Josephus. Full results are here.

“As athletes it’s hard to show that you love your country and also say that change is needed,” was posted on Lyles’ Instagram, along with hashtags including #blacklivesmatter. “This is my way of saying this country is great but it can be better.”

Lyles, the world 200m champion, also paid respect to 1968 Olympic 200m gold and bronze medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos three hours before the race.

He tweeted an iconic image of Smith and Carlos raising their single black-gloved fists on the medal stand at the Mexico City Games. Thirteen minutes earlier, Lyles posted an Instagram Story image of his socks for the meet — plain, dark colored.

Smith and Carlos wore black socks without shoes on the podium to signify endemic poverty back in the U.S. at the time.

Lyles is known for his socks, often posting images of colorful pairs he wears before races, themes including Speed Racer, R2-D2 and Sonic the Hedgehog.

“We are at the point where you can’t do nothing anymore,” Lyles said Wednesday. “There aren’t any rules set out. You’re kind of just pushing the boundary as far as you can go. Some people have said, even if there were rules, they’re willing to go farther than that.”

MORE: Noah, Josephus Lyles take 4-year journey to Monaco

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Joshua Cheptegei breaks 5000m world record in Monaco

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Ugandan Joshua Cheptegei broke a 16-year-old world record in the 5000m by nearly two seconds, clocking 12:35.36 in Monaco on Friday.

Cheptegei, the 2019 World 10,000m champion who reportedly needed 80 hours to travel from Uganda for the Diamond League meet, took 1.99 seconds off Ethiopian legend Kenenisa Bekele‘s world record from 2004. Bekele is also the 10,000m world-record holder and the second-fastest marathoner in history.

“It took a lot of mind setting to keep being motivated this year because so many people are staying at home, but you have to stay motivated,” Cheptegei said, according to organizers. “I pushed myself, I had the right staff with me, the right coach.”

Cheptegei, 23, came into Monaco as the 73rd-fastest man in history with a personal best of 12:57.41. But he declared before the meet that the world record was his goal, given he had no Olympics or world championships to peak for this year.

“It is very difficult to run any world record,” was posted on the Instagram of Bekele, who is part of the NN Running Team with Cheptegei. “Congratulations to my teammate [Cheptegei].”

Full Monaco results are here. The Diamond League next moves to Stockholm on Aug. 23.

In other events Friday, Noah Lyles easily won a 200m after raising a black-gloved first before the start. More on Lyles’ gesture and victory here.

Donavan Brazier extended a year-plus 800m win streak, clocking 1:43.15 and holding off countryman Bryce Hoppel by .08. Brazier won his last seven meets, including national, world and Diamond League titles in 2019, when he broke a 34-year-old American record.

Olympic silver medalist Orlando Ortega of Spain won the 110m hurdles in 13.11 seconds, overtaking world champion Grant Holloway. Holloway, who won worlds in 13.10 last autumn, finished fourth in 13.19.

Timothy Cheruiyot followed his 2019 World title by clocking his second-fastest 1500m ever. The Kenyan recorded 3:28.45, holding off Norwegian 19-year-old Jakob Ingebrigtsen, who set a European record of 3:28.68.

Sifan Hassan, the world’s top female distance runner, dropped out of the 5000m with two and a half laps left while in the lead pack. Two-time world champion Hellen Obiri won in 14:22.12, surging past Ethiopian Letesenbet Gidey on the final lap.

Karsten Warholm ran the joint eighth-fastest 400m hurdles in history, a 47.10 against a field that lacked rivals Rai Benjamin and Abderrahman Samba. Warholm, the two-time world champion, ranks second in history with a personal best of 46.92, trailing only American Kevin Young‘s 46.78 from the 1992 Olympics.

American Lynna Irby won her Diamond League debut with a 50.50 in the 400m. Irby, the second-fastest American in 2018, failed to make the 2019 World team. On Friday, she beat Wadeline Jonathas, the top American in 2019.

Pole vault world-record holder Mondo Duplantis needed three tries to clear 5.70 meters, then won with a 5.80-meter clearance (and then cleared six meters). Duplantis, whose mom drove his poles 25 hours from Sweden to Monaco, brought the world record to 6.18 meters in February.

American Sam Kendricks, two-time reigning world pole vault champion, did not compete because his poles did not arrive.

MORE: Noah, Josephus Lyles take 4-year journey to Monaco

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