Brady Ellison
AP

Shooting star: Archer Brady Ellison aims at Tokyo gold with arm pain gone

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In between remodeling his archery workshop and raising piglets, Brady Ellison shoots about 100 arrows a day on his custom-built range.

That’s not very high volume for him. He’s scaled way back with the coronavirus pandemic postponing the Tokyo Games until next summer and his season on hold.

This is the promising part: No shooting pain.

A little while back, the three-time Olympic medalist felt searing discomfort through his right arm whenever he released an arrow.

Doctors couldn’t solve it. He couldn’t shoot through it. He nearly quit and went to work at a local copper mine in Arizona.

Now gold in Tokyo is back in the picture.

His comeback will be highlighted in an upcoming documentary and features a Hollywood-esque twist: A natural healer in Slovenia helped alleviate his pain to the point where he became the world champion.

“I went from looking for jobs and quitting archery to believing I’m going to win in Tokyo,” the 31-year-old Ellison said in a phone interview from his six-acre property in Globe, Arizona, where he’s waiting for the season to resume. “I now have more drive than I’ve ever had.”

Usually around this time of year, Ellison is shooting 300 arrows each day on a range he built with a tractor and features 50- and 70-meter targets.

Instead, he’s scaled back the shooting and is taking care of house projects. He rebuilt the wood floor in his workshop, which also serves as his indoor facility. It’s actually two sheds pushed close together in which he simply opens the doors to both in order to shoot.

He’s also tending to a litter of piglets and squeezing in some bow fishing.

Anything to pass the time until competitions start back up. He’s not feeling the crunch even though he relies on events for about 70% of his income. Over the years, he’s been financially savvy with his earnings.

“I’ve always said that if I get hurt or anything, I want to still be able to pay all my bills and lose nothing if I have to go get a job at McDonald’s,” he said.

Ellison sees himself competing through the 2028 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, if not longer.

Especially now, with his arm back to feeling better.

Shortly after capturing an Olympic bronze medal in the individual event at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, along with silver during the team competition, Ellison began experiencing pain in one of his fingers.

Steadily, it grew worse as the pain radiated from his fingertips through his arm.

“Felt like bolts of lighting when I shot,” he said.

The discomfort persisted into 2017 and ’18. He consulted medical experts and hand specialists.

“The doctors, they pretty much just all told me to quit,” said Ellison, who also earned a silver in the team event at the 2012 London Games.

His wife, Toja, competes in archery for Slovenia and heard of a natural healer back home. The healer specialized in helping those with thyroid conditions, which Ellison has dealt with and for which he takes medication. He went in the fall of 2018 for that reason.

He never mentioned his arm concerns.

First consultation: “He told me that I had an injury in my right hand,” Ellison said.

Ellison said the process was simple. The healer put his hands on Ellison’s arm/hand and he almost instantly felt relief.

“Three days later I shot more arrows in a single day than I have in three years,” said Ellison, who still visits the healer when he and his wife return to Slovenia. “No pain.”

In 2019, Ellison turned in a memorable season that included a world title and a return to the No. 1 spot in the world rankings for the first time since March 2013.

“In the back of your head, you’re a little afraid (the pain) could happen again,” Ellison said. “So you make every day count while you can. I didn’t take anything for granted like before.”

An image of Ellison went viral on social media during the Rio Games. A picture of a bearded Ellison ran alongside a shot of actor Leonardo DiCaprio from the movie “The Revenant.”

The resemblance was spot on. He was asked almost as much about that as his medals.

“All of a sudden people just showed up at the field and I’m asked, ‘Hey, what do you think about the comparisons with him?’” recalled Ellison. “And then I looked it up and I’m like, ‘OK, this really became a thing.’ It’s all fun.”

Now, there’s even more in common with DiCaprio: Both appear in movies.

World Archery followed Ellison last season for a film titled “Believe: Brady Ellison.” He hasn’t seen an edited version, but has watched the trailer of the documentary due out this summer.

He gives it a thumbs up.

“Hopefully it will get a lot of hits since no sporting events are going on right now,” Ellison said. “I’m really looking forward to seeing it.”

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Remco Evenepoel fractures pelvis in crash over bridge wall into ravine

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Belgian cyclist Remco Evenepoel fractured his pelvis crashing his bike and flipping over a bridge wall into a ravine at the Tour of Lombardy in Italy on Saturday.

Video showed Evenepoel, the 20-year-old world time trial silver medalist, being put in an ambulance on a stretcher minutes after the crash.

His team, Deceuninck-QuickStep, reported he remained conscious while being put on a stretcher, into an ambulance and taken to a hospital. He also suffered a right lung contusion.

In 2019, Evenepoel became the youngest-ever male podium finisher in a senior world road cycling championships event, according to Gracenote. In 2018, he swept the junior road race and time trial world titles.

MORE: UCI looks for new host for 2020 World Road Cycling Championships

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Noah Lyles raises black-gloved fist, wins 200m in Monaco

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Noah Lyles said he had plans going forward to make statements, beyond his rapid sprint times. He did that in Monaco on Friday.

Lyles raised a black, fingerless-gloved right fist before getting into the blocks to win a 200m in his first international race of the season, conjuring memories of the famous 1968 Olympic podium gesture.

He clocked 19.76 seconds, leading a one-two with younger brother Josephus. Full results are here.

“As athletes it’s hard to show that you love your country and also say that change is needed,” was posted on Lyles’ Instagram, along with hashtags including #blacklivesmatter. “This is my way of saying this country is great but it can be better.”

Lyles, the world 200m champion, also paid respect to 1968 Olympic 200m gold and bronze medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos three hours before the race.

He tweeted an iconic image of Smith and Carlos raising their single black-gloved fists on the medal stand at the Mexico City Games. Thirteen minutes earlier, Lyles posted an Instagram Story image of his socks for the meet — plain, dark colored.

Smith and Carlos wore black socks without shoes on the podium to signify endemic poverty back in the U.S. at the time.

Lyles is known for his socks, often posting images of colorful pairs he wears before races, themes including Speed Racer, R2-D2 and Sonic the Hedgehog.

“We are at the point where you can’t do nothing anymore,” Lyles said Wednesday. “There aren’t any rules set out. You’re kind of just pushing the boundary as far as you can go. Some people have said, even if there were rules, they’re willing to go farther than that.”

MORE: Noah, Josephus Lyles take 4-year journey to Monaco

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