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In gymnastics, decisions continue to impact athletes during competition break

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For gymnastics, competition may have stopped during the coronavirus pandemic, but the news hasn’t.

An Olympic champion’s coach was banned eight years for verbal and emotional abuse of athletes. A decision on an age minimum for the Tokyo Games in 2021 caused a stir among the U.S.’ top female gymnasts. Another American qualified for the Tokyo Olympics last month, even while no meets were happening.

Meanwhile, the most common concern voiced to USA Gymnastics by athletes and coaches is how and when to return to training in a normal environment.

“It’s hard to say specifically because our gyms are spread out all across the country, so there’s a big variety in the different situations that every gym is in,” USA Gymnastics Chief Programs Officer Stefanie Korepin said in a phone interview earlier this month. “So we’re encouraging them to follow their local health authorities and the local government regulations about when they can open and when they can return to play.”

Korepin noted USA Gymnastics’ coronavirus resource page on its website. And an athlete health and wellness council that is working with its medical team and coaches to develop guidelines to reintegrate athletes into the gym.

Some athletes have still been able to train on gymnastics equipment. At least one female Olympic hopeful was still training on some days at her normal gym as of early-to-mid April. Yul Moldauer, the 2017 U.S. men’s all-around champion, had a pommel horse set up in his garage. Simone Biles returned to her gym on Monday, according to her social media, as Texas reopens.

Korepin said USA Gymnastics had “no solid data” on the amount of apparatus training national team athletes have had.

“Word of mouth, I think very few athletes, there are a handful, but very few are actually in a gym training,” Korepin said before some states began reopening earlier this month, “and I think a slightly larger percentage, but still not that many, have equipment. But the equipment they have in their home is not full gymnastics equipment.”

Unlike in swimming and track and field, no top-level competitions are scheduled, even tentatively, for later this year. Premier events in the U.S. will not be held before 2021. Internationally, World Cup meets originally scheduled for this spring were postponed indefinitely or canceled.

USA Gymnastics may hold a re-ranking-type event in artistic gymnastics in early 2021. The next top-level women’s meet, the U.S. Classic, an annual tune-up event for nationals, will be May 22, 2021.

Without recent competitions, U.S. officials faced other matters.

Most recently, Maggie Haney, who coached Laurie Hernandez to gold and silver medals at the Rio Olympics, was banned eight years by an independent hearing panel for verbal and emotional abuse of athletes. Hernandez later went public, reportedly testifying against Haney and saying she developed eating disorders and depression as a result of the coach’s actions. Haney provided her first statement to NBC for the TODAY Show on Monday.

Haney’s ban was handed down more than three years after the first complaint against her. USA Gymnastics said in a statement that the Safe Sport investigation and resolution process must be faster. It noted an increase in Safe Sport department personnel, from one to eight people over the last few years, and a commitment to add even more resources.

“We vow to do better – to respond more empathically, to resolve complaints more efficiently, and to be more vigilant,” USA Gymnastics CEO Li Li Leung said in a statement. “We will keep improving this process until our athletes and our community can trust it. And we will keep working with our community to improve the culture within our sport, so that abuse like this is no longer tolerated.”

Two significant decisions related to the Tokyo Olympics were made last month.

Jade Carey became the first U.S. gymnast to clinch an Olympic spot when the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG) ruled to count qualifying results as final results in an international competition in March that was halted midway through due to the coronavirus (Carey was all but certain to qualify even before that March meet).

In previous Olympics, all of the U.S. gymnasts were determined at or after the Olympic Trials. But Carey qualified a spot for herself via a new route instituted for this Olympic cycle, combining results over a series of meets the last two years.

Carey is eligible to compete in all individual events in Tokyo, but not the team event. However, Carey could decline the individual spot that she earned and try to make the U.S. team of four by competing at nationals and trials next year. If she does that, it’s possible the U.S. will lose that individual spot to another nation and send one fewer gymnast to the Olympics overall.

“That choice is completely up to Jade, and we will fully support her whatever she decides to do,” Korepin said.

With the Olympics moved to 2021, the FIG is allowing athletes who would have been one year too young for a 2020 Olympics to be eligible for the Tokyo Games next year. A group of U.S. gymnasts who turn 16 in 2021 can now bid for the Olympics, three years earlier than they originally planned. Three members of the 2019 U.S. women’s team at last year’s world championships disagreed with the decision.

USA Gymnastics will give those younger gymnasts an opportunity to make the Olympic team. Its bylaws require it to.

“The Olympics are a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for a lot of our athletes, and they peak at a specific time,” Korepin said. “And to have that pool of athletes that they have to compete against for the Olympics changed can be really difficult. But, on the other hand, there are really incredible young athletes who now have an opportunity that they didn’t have before, so we’re excited for them. It’s definitely a mixed bag of emotions.”

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Tadej Pogacar stuns Primoz Roglic, set to win Tour de France

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Tadej Pogacar overtook countryman Primoz Roglic and is set to become the youngest Tour de France champion since 1904, the second-youngest in history and the first Slovenian champion.

Pogacar, who turns 22 on Monday, overcame a 57-second deficit to Roglic and won Saturday’s penultimate stage, a 22-mile time trial with a finishing four-mile climb. He is 59 seconds ahead of Roglic after three weeks and 84 hours of total racing.

“Actually, my dream was just to be [in] the Tour de France,” Pogacar said. “I cannot believe it, and if you ask me in one week, one month, I will still not believe it, probably.”

Pogacar won the stage by 81 seconds, greater than the margin separating second place from eighth place after 55 minutes on the roads. Roglic was fifth.

It’s reminiscent of American Greg LeMond surpassing Frenchman Laurent Fignon in the time trial finale of the 1989 Tour.

That final margin was the closest in Tour history — eight seconds. This one would be the 11th time in Tour history that the difference is less than a minute, according to ProCyclingStats.com.

“I struggled with everything, just not enough power,” Roglic said. “I was just more and more without the power that I obviously needed. I was just really giving everything till the end.”

Australian Richie Porte will join Pogacar and Roglic on the podium after moving up from fourth place going into the time trial. Colombian Miguel Angel Lopez, who came into the day in third, dropped to sixth.

It’s the first time since 2007 that everybody on the final Tour de France podium will be there for the first time.

TOUR DE FRANCE: Standings | TV, Stream Schedule | Stage By Stage

Sunday’s finale is the traditional ceremonial ride into Paris where the overall leaders don’t attack each other.

Pogacar is riding his first Tour de France and in his second season as a professional cyclist with a World Tour team.

Last September, he finished third in the Vuelta a Espana, one of three Grand Tours, which Roglic won. At the time, Pogacar became the youngest Grand Tour podium finisher since 1974.

“I knew that I can be with the best, that I can follow,” after the Vuelta, Pogacar said, “but I never thought that I would win already this year, especially in this season that was really strange.”

UAE Team Emirates initially planned to use Pogacar to support Fabio Aru, but the Slovenian’s continued emergence changed the plan.

“I’m going [to the Tour] firstly to learn,” Pogacar said in May. “But if I have a chance to show what I can do, I will.”

Pogacar was Robin to Roglic’s Batman for most of this Tour.

Roglic wore the yellow jersey as race leader the last two weeks. heading the dominant Jumbo-Visma team. Pogacar donned the white jersey for the highest-placed rider 25 and under, though he was on a weaker team.

But when they went head-to-head on climbs, Pogacar usually stuck with Roglic, sometimes riding away from him.

When it came down to the final climb on Saturday, with no team support in what they call the race of truth, Pogacar showed who was the strongest Slovenian.

“[Roglic] was really superior through the whole Tour,” Pogacar said. “He must be devastated, but that’s bike racing, I guess. Today I beat him, and that was it.”

MORE: USA Cycling names Olympic team finalists

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2020 Tour de France standings

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2020 Tour de France standings for the yellow jersey, green jersey, white jersey and polka-dot jersey through stage 20 of 21 …

Overall (Yellow Jersey)
1. Tadej Pogacar (SLO) — 84:26:33
2. Primoz Roglic (SLO) — +:59
3. Richie Porte (AUS) — +3:30
4. Mikel Landa (ESP) — +5:58
5. Enric Mas (ESP) — +6:07
6. Miguel Angel Lopez (COL) — +6:47
7. Tom Dumoulin (NED) — +7:48
8. Rigberto Uran (COL) — +8:02
9. Adam Yates (GBR) — +9:25
10. Damiano Caruso (ITA) — +14:03
13. Richard Carapaz (ECU) — +24:44
15. Sepp Kuss (USA) — +42:20
17. Nairo Quintana (COL) — +1:02:46
29. Thibaut Pinot (FRA) — +1:59:33
36. Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) — +2:17:41
DNF. Egan Bernal (COL)

Sprinters (Green Jersey)
1. Sam Bennett (IRL) — 319 points
2. Peter Sagan (SVK) — 264
3. Matteo Trentin (ITA) — 250
4. Bryan Coquard (FRA) — 173
5. Caleb Ewan (AUS) — 158

Climbers (Polka-Dot Jersey)
1. Tadej Pogacar (SLO) — 82 points
2. Richard Carapaz (ECU) — 74
3. Primoz Roglic (SLO) — 67
4. Marc Hirschi (SUI) — 62
5. Miguel Angel Lopez (COL) — 51

Young Rider (White Jersey)
1. Tadej Pogacar (SLO) — 84:26:33
2. Enric Mas (ESP) — +6:07
3. Valentin Madouas (FRA) — +1:42:22
4. Dani Martinez (COL) — +1:54:51
5. Lennard Kamna (GER) — +2:14:33

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