U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials results

2021 U.S. Olympic Trials - Swimming - Day 1
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Results from the U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials for the Tokyo Games in Omaha. The top two per individual event (and up to top six in 100m and 200m freestyles for relays) make the Olympic team, should enough swimmers make it in multiple events to keep the roster at or below 26 swimmers per gender and no more than 12 relay-only swimmers …

Men’s 400m Individual Medley
1. Chase Kalisz — 4:09.09

2. Jay Litherland — 4:10.33
3. Carson Foster — 4:10.86
4. Bobby Finke — 4:11.44
5. Jake Foster — 4:13.74
6. David Johnston — 4:16.81
7. Michael Daly — 4:19.05
8. Sam Stewart — 4:22.83

Men’s 400m Freestyle
1. Kieran Smith — 3:44.86

2. Jake Mitchell — 3:48.17 (later swam 3:45.86 in a time trial to get an Olympic qualifying time)
3. Ross Dant — 3:48.30
4. Chris Wieser — 3:48.42
5. Brooks Fail — 3:48.47
6. Trey Freeman — 3:49.07
7. Mitch D’Arrigo — 3:50.87
8. Andrew Abruzzo — 3:51.45

Women’s 400m Individual Medley
1. Emma Weyant — 4:33.81
2. Hali Flickinger — 4:33.96
3. Melanie Margalis — 4:34.08
4. Leah Smith — 4:34.55
5. Ally McHugh — 4:36.81
6. Brooke Forde — 4:38.69
7. Evie Pfeifer — 4:40.23
8. Justina Kozan — 4:42.72

Women’s 100m Butterfly
1. Torri Huske — 55.66

2. Claire Curzan — 56.43
3. Kate Douglass — 56.56
4. Kelsi Dahlia — 56.80
5. Katie McLaughlin — 57.72
6. Kelly Pash — 58.27
7. Olivia Bray — 58.36
8. Aly Tetzloff — 58.57

Men’s 100m Breaststroke
1. Michael Andrew — 58.73
2. Andrew Wilson — 58.74
3. Nic Fink — 58.80
4. Kevin Cordes — 59.79
5. Josh Matheny — 1:00.22
6. Will Licon — 1:00.39
7. Max McHugh — 1:00.56
7. Ben Cono — 1:00.56

Women’s 400m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 4:01.27
2. Paige Madden — 4:04.86
3. Leah Smith — 4:06.27
4. Haley Anderson — 4:07.42
5. Emma Nordin — 4:08.49
6. Sierra Schmidt — 4:09.11
7. Kaersten Meitz — 4:09.19
8. Cavan Gormsen — 4:09.85

Men’s 200m Freestyle
1. Kieran Smith — 1:45.29
2. Townley Haas — 1:45.66
3. Drew Kibler — 1:45.92
4. Andrew Seliskar — 1:46.34
5. Zach Apple — 1:46.45
6. Patrick Callan — 1:46.49
7. Blake Pieroni — 1:46.57
8. Carson Foster — 1:46.67
*top five are nominated to the team for 4x200m freestyle relay

Women’s 100m Backstroke
1. Regan Smith — 58.35
2. Rhyan White — 58.60
3. Olivia Smoliga — 58.72
4. Katharine Berkoff — 58.82
5. Isabelle Stadden — 59.37
6. Phoebe Bacon — 59.58
7. Catie DeLoof — 58.87
8. Lisa Bratton — 1:00.24

Men’s 100m Backstroke
1. Ryan Murphy — 52.33
2. Hunter Armstrong — 52.48
3. Shaine Casas — 52.76
4. Bryce Mefford — 52.91
5. Justin Ress — 53
6. Matt Grevers — 53.27
7. Hunter Tapp — 53.45
8. Michael Andrew — 53.59

Women’s 100m Breaststroke
1. Lilly King — 1:04.79
2. Lydia Jacoby — 1:05.28
3. Annie Lazor — 1:05.6
4. Bethany Galat — 1:05.75
5. Kaitlyn Dobler — 1:06.29
6. Micah Sumrall — 1:06.84
7. Molly Hannis — 1:07.26
8. Emily Escobedo — 1:07.31
9. Miranda Tucker — 1:07.44

Women’s 200m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 1:55.11
2. Allison Schmitt — 1:56.79
3. Paige Madden — 1:56.80
4. Katie McLaughlin — 1:57.16
5. Bella Sims — 1:57.53
6. Brooke Forde — 1:57.61
7. Gabby DeLoof — 1:57.86
8. Leah Smith — 1:58.13
*top five are nominated to the team for 4x200m freestyle relay

Men’s 200m Butterfly
1. Zach Harting — 1:55.06
2. Gunnar Bentz — 1:55.34
3. Luca Urlando — 1:55.43
4. Nicolas Albiero — 1:55.85
5. Trenton Julian — 1:56.35
6. Corey Gambardella — 1:56.79
7. Zach Brown — 1:57.13
8. Brooks Fail — 1:57.53

Women’s 200m Individual Medley
1. Alex Walsh — 2:09.30
2. Kate Douglass — 2:09.32
3. Madisyn Cox — 2:09.34
4. Torri Huske — 2:10.38
5. Meghan Small — 2:11.65
6. Melanie Margalis — 2:11.77
7. Beata Nelson — 2:11.96
8. Emma Barksdale — 2:13.35

Women’s 1500m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 15:40.50
2. Erica Sullivan — 15:51.18
3. Katie Grimes — 15:52.12
4. Haley Anderson — 15:55.60
5. Ashley Twichell — 16:01.62
6. Ally McHugh — 16:08.52
7. Sierra Schmidt — 16:08.69
8. Kensey McMahon — 16:20.03

Men’s 800m Freestyle
1. Bobby Finke — 7:48.22
2. Michael Brinegar — 7:49.94
3. Ross Dant — 7:50.66
4. Jordan Wilimovsky — 7:53.07
5. Will Gallant — 7:57.97
6. Trey Freeman — 7:59.09
7. James Plage — 8:00.43
8. Andrew Abruzzo — 8:01.81

Men’s 200m Breaststroke
1. Nic Fink — 2:07.55
2. Andrew Wilson — 2:08.32
3. Will Licon — 2:08.50
4. Kevin Cordes — 2:10.06
5. Aj Pouch — 2:10.35
6. Jake Foster — 2:11.24
7. Daniel Roy — 2:11.87
8. Matt Fallon — 2:12.25

Women’s 200m Butterfly
1. Hali Flickinger — 2:05.85
2. Regan Smith — 2:06.99
3. Charlotte Hook — 2:07.92
4. Lindsay Looney — 2:08.40
5. Kelly Pash — 2:08.58
6. Dakota Luther — 2:09.40
7. Olivia Carter — 2:09.79
8. Rachel Klinker — 2:11.09

Men’s 100m Freestyle
1. Caeleb Dressel — 47.39
2. Zach Apple — 47.72
3. Blake Pieroni — 48.16
4. Brooks Curry — 48.19
5. Bowe Becker — 48.22
6. Ryan Held — 48.46
7. Brett Pinfold — 48.47
8. Coleman Stewart — 48.51
*top five are nominated to the team for 4x100m freestyle relay

Women’s 200m Breaststroke
1. Annie Lazor — 2:21.07
2. Lilly King — 2:21.75
3. Emily Escobedo — 2:22.64
4. Bethany Galat — 2:22.81
5. Ella Nelson — 2:25.10
6. Micah Sumrall — 2:26.78
7. Allie Raab — 2:27.47
8. Rachel Bernhardt — 2:29.57

Men’s 200m Backstroke
1. Ryan Murphy — 1:54.20

2. Bryce Mefford — 1:54.79
3. Austin Katz — 1:55.86
4. Hunter Tapp — 1:56.76
5. Destin Lasco — 1:56.98
6. Shaine Casas — 1:57.64
7. Jack Aikins — 1:57.90
8. Daniel Carr — 1:58.76

Men’s 200m Individual Medley
1. Michael Andrew — 1:55.44
2. Chase Kalisz — 1:56.97
3. Kieran Smith — 1:57.23
4. Carson Foster — 1:57.99
5. Sam Stewart — 1:58.02
6. Andrew Seliskar — 1:58.35
7. Ryan Lochte — 1:59.67
8. Trenton Julian — 2:04.49

Women’s 100m Freestyle
1. Abbey Weitzeil — 53.53

2. Erika Brown — 53.59
3. Olivia Smoliga — 53.63
4. Natalie Hinds — 53.84
5. Catie DeLoof — 53.87
6. Allison Schmitt — 54.12
7. Kate Douglass — 54.17
8. Linnea Mack — 54.32
*top six are nominated to the team for 4x100m freestyle relay

Men’s 100m Butterfly
1. Caeleb Dressel — 49.87
2. Tom Shields — 51.19
3. Luca Urlando — 51.64
4. Trenton Julian — 51.78
4. Coleman Stewart — 51.78
6. Zach Harting — 52.39
7. Tyler Sesvold — 52.6
8. Danny Kovac — 52.68

Women’s 200m Backstroke
1. Rhyan White — 2:05.73
2. Phoebe Bacon — 2:06.46
3. Regan Smith — 2:06.79
4. Isabelle Stadden — 2:07.86
5. Kathleen Baker — 2:08.78
6. Lisa Bratton — 2:09.03
7. JoJo Ramey — 2:09.90
8. Katharine Berkoff — 2:10.2

Women’s 800m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 8:14.62
2. Katie Grimes — 8:20.36
3. Haley Anderson — 8:20.51
4. Ally McHugh — 8:23.51
5. Bella Sims — 8:23.55
6. Erica Sullivan — 8:24.02
7. Kaersten Meitz — 8:31.88
8. Sierra Schmidt — 8:39.51

Men’s 50m Freestyle
1. Caeleb Dressel — 21.04

2. Michael Andrew — 21.48
3. Nathan Adrian — 21.73
4. Bowe Becker — 21.78
5. Adam Chaney — 22.08
6. David Curtiss — 22.12
7. Justin Ress — 22.14
8. Michael Chadwick — 22.23

Women’s 50m Freestyle
1. Simone Manuel — 24.29
2. Abbey Weitzeil — 24.30
3. Torri Huske — 24.46
4. Linnea Mack — 24.49
5. Gretchen Walsh — 24.74
6. Kate Douglass — 24.78
7. Catie DeLoof — 24.80
8. Erika Brown — 24.93

Men’s 1500m Freestyle
1. Bobby Finke — 14:46.06
2. Michael Brinegar — 15:00.87
3. Jordan Wilimovsky — 15:05.29
4. Arik Katz — 15:11.34
5. Charlie Clark — 15:14.11
6. Will Gallant — 15:17.34
7. David Johnston — 15:18.61
8. Brennan Gravley — 15:25.26

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Diana Taurasi says 2024 Paris Olympics ‘on my radar’

Diana Taurasi
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Diana Taurasi said immediately after winning her fifth Olympic gold medal in Tokyo that she might try for a record sixth in Paris.

It’s still on her mind 17 months out of the 2024 Paris Olympics.

“It’s something that it’s on my radar,” Taurasi told The Associated Press in a phone interview Tuesday after the first day of a USA Basketball training camp in Minnesota, her first national team activity since Tokyo. “I’m still competitive, still driven, still want to play, I still love being a part of USA Basketball.”

Taurasi will be 42 at the time of the Paris Games — older than any previous Olympic basketball player — but said if she’s healthy enough she’d like to give it a go.

“If the opportunity comes to play and be a part of it, it’s something I’ve always taken a lot of pride in,” said Taurasi, who shares the record of five Olympic basketball gold medals with the retired Sue Bird. “When you get to my age at this point in my career, you just try to win every day. Right now this is a good opportunity to be part of this team moving forward we’ll see what happens.”

She said she would have played at the FIBA World Cup last year in Australia, but had a quad strain that kept her out of the end of the WNBA season.

“I got hurt a little bit before. I had a good conversation with Coach (Cheryl) Reeve and (USA Basketball CEO Jim) Tooley. I felt like I hadn’t played enough basketball to be out there and help,” Taurasi said. “That’s the biggest thing with USA Basketball is being able to help the team win.”

Reeve said Monday that when she succeeded Dawn Staley as head coach a few months after Tokyo, she wasn’t sure whether Taurasi would play for the national team again. That was before her conversation with Taurasi.

“I look forward to having a chance to have her be around and be, as I told her, a great voice,” Reeve said. “Obviously, the competitive fire that she competes with is something that we all do well with.”

In Tokyo, Taurasi started all six games and averaged 18.8 minutes per game, sixth-most on the team (fewer than backup guard Chelsea Gray). Her 5.8 points per game were her fewest in her Olympic career, though she was dealing with a hip injury.

Taurasi is an unrestricted free agent although she is expected to return back to Phoenix where she’s spent her entire career since getting drafted No. 1 overall in 2003.

“Phoenix still has things they need to work out,” the WNBA’s all-time leading scorer said.

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Alexis Pinturault wins world championships combined; American in fourth

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France’s Alexis Pinturault won the world Alpine skiing championships combined at his home venue after defending world champion Marco Schwarz blew a lead in the final seconds of his slalom run.

Pinturault, a 31-year-old who hadn’t won a race in nearly two years (the longest drought of his distinguished career), prevailed by one tenth of a second over the Austrian Schwarz in Courchevel, France.

“I hope to enjoy it because it was pretty difficult some months ago,” Pinturault said.

Austrian Raphael Haaser took bronze in an event that combined times from a morning super-G run and an afternoon slalom run, one day after his older sister took bronze in the women’s combined.

River Radamus was fourth, a quarter of a second from becoming the first U.S. man to win an Alpine worlds medal since 2015. Radamus’ best event is the giant slalom, which is scheduled for Feb. 17 at worlds.

“It’s nice, but honestly, you don’t come to world championships hoping to get fourth,” Radamus said.

Five skiers finished within 2.98 seconds of the winner in an event that has been dropped from the annual World Cup schedule and is under review to remain on the Olympic program.

ALPINE WORLDS: Results | Broadcast Schedule

Pinturault had the fastest super-G run by six hundredths over Schwarz. Schwarz, a slightly better slalom skier than Pinturault, erased that deficit early in the slalom and had a three tenths lead at the last intermediate split.

He gave it all away about six gates from the finish, slamming on the brakes. Moments later, he crossed the finish line one tenth behind Pinturault, who reacted by pumping his fists in the air.

The Frenchman earned his first race victory since the March 2021 World Cup Finals giant slalom, where he clinched his first World Cup overall title, the biggest annual prize in ski racing. Last season, Pinturault went winless on the World Cup for the first time since he was a teenage rookie in 2011, plus went medal-less at the Olympics.

Pinturault, who grew up in Courchevel and now co-owns the family’s five-star Hotel Annapurna there, had retirement cross his mind in the offseason, according to Eurosport. He skipped a pre-worlds Sunday press conference due to illness.

Nonetheless, Pinturault was on the front page of French newspapers this week, including L’Equipe on Tuesday. In a sports cover story for Le Figaro, Pinturault said that, given the circumstances, it would be almost a “nice surprise” to go for a medal at these worlds.

Olympic champion Johannes Strolz of Austria skied out of the slalom after tying for 29th in the super-G.

Olympic silver and bronze medalists Aleksander Aamodt Kilde of Norway and Jack Crawford of Canada were among the speed specialists who did not start the slalom. They essentially used the event as a training run for Thursday’s super-G.

Worlds continue Wednesday with the women’s super-G, where Mikaela Shiffrin is a medal contender but not the favorite. She can tie the modern-era records for individual world championships gold medals (seven) and total medals (12).

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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