U.S. Olympic soccer roster for Tokyo led by Megan Rapinoe, Carli Lloyd, Alex Morgan

USA  v Holland  -World Cup Women
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Megan RapinoeCarli Lloyd and Alex Morgan get one more major tournament together with the U.S. national team.

The Tokyo Olympic soccer roster of 18 players — the oldest in U.S. history since women’s soccer debuted at the 1996 Atlanta Games — was announced Wednesday, and it includes the three stalwart forwards.

They’re joined by goalies Adrianna Franch and Alyssa Naeher, defenders Abby DahlkemperTierna Davidson. Crystal Dunn, Kelley O’Hara, Becky Sauerbrunn and Emily Sonnett, midfielders Julie Ertz, Lindsey Horan, Rose LavelleKristie Mewis and Samantha Mewis and fellow forwards Tobin Heath and Christen Press.

Seventeen of the 18 players were on the 2019 World Cup champion team (all but Kristie Mewis).

The average age will be 30.8 years old come kickoff in Japan (against Sweden on July 21). In Rio, the average was 27.8.

Rapinoe, 35, makes the team two years after winning the Golden Ball at the World Cup. The U.S. is trying to become the first nation to follow a World Cup title with Olympic gold, five years after failing to do so, getting eliminated in the quarterfinals in Rio (after which since-departed goalie Hope Solo called opponent Sweden “a bunch of cowards” for defensive play.)

“We have very high standards for the team, which is championship or total failure, so we felt like total failures,” Rapinoe said this spring of 2016. “It definitely left, I wouldn’t say a bad taste. I think it left a fire under people to never let that happen again.”

ON HER TURF: Meet the U.S. Olympic women’s soccer team

Rapinoe will be joined in Tokyo by fiancée Sue Bird, who on Monday became the oldest player named to a U.S. Olympic basketball team at 40.

Lloyd, who turns 39 on July 16, is set to become the oldest U.S. Olympic soccer player in history. Christie Pearce Rampone, who was 37 in 2012, currently holds the record.

Lloyd predicted back in 2015 that the Tokyo Games would ideally be the end point of her national team career.

Since, she started every match at the Rio Olympics as a captain. Then she was primarily a reserve at the 2019 World Cup, calling into question whether she could make it back, especially with five fewer players on the Olympic roster than at the World Cup. And even more so with a one-year Olympic postponement.

Lloyd netted all three U.S. goals in the 2008 and 2012 Olympic gold-medal games.

Morgan, 31, is the fifth player to make a U.S. Olympic soccer team coming back from childbirth.

Defender Joy Fawcett played every minute of the 1995, 1999 and 2003 World Cups and the 1996 and 2000 Olympics as a mom. Carla Overbeck became a mom before making her second Olympic team in 2000, though she did not play in any matches in Australia. Kate Markgraf played in the 2008 Olympics as a mom, and Rampone did so in 2008 and 2012.

The Mewises are the first American sisters to play on an Olympic or World Cup team.

Lloyd and Heath are set to tie Rampone’s U.S. record of competing in four Olympic soccer tournaments. Ertz and Heath are coming back from knee injuries.

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Eliud Kipchoge breaks marathon world record in Berlin

Eliud Kipchoge Berlin Marathon
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Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge broke his own world record in winning the Berlin Marathon, clocking 2:01:09 to lower the previous record time of 2:01:39 he set in the German capital in 2018.

Kipchoge, 37 and a two-time Olympic champion, earned his 15th win in 17 career marathons to bolster his claim as the greatest runner in history over 26.2 miles.

His pacing was not ideal. Kipchoge slowed over the second half, running 61:18 for the second half after going out in 59:51 for the first 13.1 miles. He still won by 4:49 over Kenyan Mark Korir.

Ethiopian Tigist Assefa won the women’s race in 2:15:37, the third-fastest time in history. Only Brigid Kosgei (2:14:14 in Chicago in 2019) and Paula Radcliffe (2:15:25 in London in 2003) have gone faster.

American record holder Keira D’Amato, who entered as the top seed, was sixth in 2:21:48.

MORE: Berlin Marathon Results

The last eight instances the men’s marathon world record has been broken, it has come on the pancake-flat roads of Berlin. It began in 2003, when Kenyan Paul Tergat became the first man to break 2:05.

The world record was 2:02:57 — set by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto in 2014 — until Kipchoge broke it for the first time four years ago. The following year, Kipchoge became the first person to cover 26.2 miles in under two hours, doing so in a non-record-eligible showcase rather than a race.

Kipchoge’s focus going forward is trying to become the first runner to win three Olympic marathon titles in Paris in 2024. He also wants to win all six annual World Marathon Majors. He’s checked off four of them, only missing Boston (run in April) and New York City (run every November).

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2022 Berlin Marathon Results

2022 Berlin Marathon
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2022 Berlin Marathon top-10 results and notable finishers from men’s and women’s elite and wheelchair races. Full searchable results are here. ..

Men
1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) — 2:01:09 WORLD RECORD
2. Mark Korir (KEN) — 2:05:58
3. Tadu Abate (ETH) — 2:06:28
4. Andamiak Belihu (ETH) — 2:06:40
5. Abel Kipchumba (ETH) — 2:06:40
6. Limenih Getachew (ETH) — 2:07:07
7. Kenya Sonota (JPN) — 2:07:14
8. Tatsuya Maruyama (JPN) — 2:07:50
9. Kento Kikutani (JPN) — 2:07:56
10. Zablon Chumba (KEN) — 2:08:01
DNF. Guye Adola (ETH)

Women
1. Tigist Assefa (ETH) — 2:15:37
2. Rosemary Wanjiru (KEN) — 2:18:00
3. Tigist Abayechew (ETH) — 2:18:03
4. Workenesh Edesa (ETH) — 2:18:51
5. Meseret Sisay Gola (ETH) — 2:20:58
6. Keira D’Amato (USA) — 2:21:48
7. Rika Kaseda (JPN) — 2:21:55
8. Ayuko Suzuki (JPN) — 2:22:02
9. Sayaka Sato (JPN) — 2:22:13
10. Vibian Chepkirui (KEN) — 2:22:21

Wheelchair Men
1. Marcel Hug (SUI) — 1:24:56
2. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) — 1:28:54
3. David Weir (GBR) — 1:29:02
4. Jetze Plat (NED) — 1:29:06
5. Sho Watanabe (JPN) — 1:32:44
6. Patrick Monahan (IRL) — 1:32:46
7. Jake Lappin (AUS) — 1:32:50
8. Kota Hokinoue (JPN) — 1:33:45
9. Rafael Botello Jimenez (ESP) — 1:36:49
10. Jordie Madera Jimenez (ESP) — 1:36:50

Wheelchair Women
1. Catherine Debrunner (SUI) — 1:36:47
2. Manuela Schar (SUI) — 1:36:50
3. Susannah Scaroni (USA) — 1:36:51
4. Merle Menje (GER) — 1:43:34
5. Aline dos Santos Rocha (BRA) — 1:43:35
6. Madison de Rozario (BRA) — 1:43:35
7. Patricia Eachus (SUI) — 1:44:15
8. Vanessa De Souza (BRA) — 1:48:37
9. Alexandra Helbling (SUI) — 1:51:47
10. Natalie Simanowski (GER) — 2:05:09

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