Fabio Jakobsen wins Tour de France stage, two years after horrific crash; new race leader

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Fabio Jakobsen, a Dutchman who less than two years ago was in a medically induced coma after a race crash, won the second stage of his debut Tour de France in a sprint finish.

Jakobsen edged Belgian Wout van Aert after more than four and a half hours of racing in Denmark, the second of three days that the Tour visits the country before heading into France.

“Today’s incroyable, as we would say in French,” Jakobsen said.

Van Aert, runner-up in each of the first two stages, took over the yellow jersey as race leader by one second over stage one time trial winner Yves Lampaert of Belgium, Jakobsen’s teammate.

Van Aert and Lampaert are not expected to remain among the leaders come the mountain stages. Slovenian Tadej Pogacar, the two-time defending Tour champion, remains in optimal position in third place overall. Pogacar smashed his knuckles into a barrier in a crash Saturday, but said he stayed on his bike and hopes he’s OK.

TOUR DE FRANCE: Standings | Broadcast Schedule | Stage by Stage

In August 2020, Jakobsen suffered a Tour of Poland finish line crash that resulted in him being placed in a medically induced coma. Injuries included brain and lung contusions, skull fractures, a broken nose and the loss of 10 teeth.

He returned last year to win the sprinters’ classification at the Vuelta a Espana. He has 11 victories overall this year and was chosen over 34-time Tour de France stage winner Mark Cavendish as Team Quick-Step Alpha Vinyl’s sprinter for the Tour.

“A lot of people helped me along the way,” in the comeback, the 25-year-old Jakobsen said. “This is to pay them back so they can see that it was not for nothing.”

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Wimbledon reverses ban on Russia, Belarus tennis players

Wimbledon Russia
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Russian and Belarusian players will be able to compete at Wimbledon as neutral athletes after the All England Club on Friday reversed its ban from last year.

The players must sign declarations of neutrality and comply with “appropriate conditions,” including not expressing support for Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

“This was an incredibly difficult decision, not taken lightly or without a great deal of consideration for those who will be impacted,” All England Club chairman Ian Hewitt said in a statement.

The players cannot receive funding from the Russian or Belarusian states, including sponsorship from companies operated or controlled by the states.

Those impacted include Australian Open champion Aryna Sabalenka of Belarus and Russian players Daniil Medvedev and Andrey Rublev.

Other tennis tournaments have allowed Russian and Belarusian players to compete as neutral athletes.

“We also consider alignment between the Grand Slams to be increasingly important in the current tennis environment,” the club said.

The same conditions will apply for Lawn Tennis Association tournaments used by players as grass-court warmups for the sport’s oldest Grand Slam tournament.

The women’s and men’s professional tennis tours last year imposed heavy fines on the LTA and threatened to pull its tournaments. The ATP and WTA had also responded to last year’s ban by not awarding ranking points for Wimbledon — an unprecedented move against the prestigious event.

“There was a strong and very disappointing reaction from some governing bodies in tennis to the position taken by the All England Club and the LTA last year with consequences which, if continued, would be damaging to the interests of players, fans, The Championships and British tennis,” the club said.

This year’s Wimbledon tournament will start on July 3. The women’s final is scheduled for July 15 and the men’s final on July 16.

The All England Club said the conditions were developed through talks with the British government, the LTA and “international stakeholder bodies in tennis.”

The club’s statement described “personal player declarations” but didn’t provide details. The LTA said the players and support staff “will be required to sign neutrality declarations” similar to those used in other sports.

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2023 World Junior Gymnastics Championships live stream schedule

World Junior Gymnastics Championships
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The world junior gymnastics championships individual finals stream live on the International Gymnastics Federation YouTube channel from Friday through Sunday.

Already this week, Japan swept the men’s and women’s team titles in Antalya, Turkey. The U.S. women took silver.

The U.S. women in Friday’s all-around final are Izzy Stassi (qualified fourth) and Jayla Hang (qualified 22nd). The U.S. men in Friday’s all-around final are Kai Uemura (qualified 11th) and David Shamah (qualified 14th).

Americans also advanced to four of this weekend’s apparatus finals: women’s vault (Stassi, Hang), uneven bars (Hezly Rivera) and floor exercise (Rivera, Hang) and men’s still rings (Uemura).

Gymnastics added a biennial junior worlds starting in 2019. The 2021 edition was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Women ages 14 or 15 and men ages 15 through 18 compete.

The U.S. team in 2019 included future senior world team members Skye Blakely, Kayla DiCello and Konnor McClain.

2023 World Junior Gymnastics Championships Live Stream Schedule

Day Competition Time (ET) Platform
Friday Men’s All-Around 7:30 a.m. FIG YouTube | LIVE STREAM LINK
Women’s All-Around 12 p.m. FIG YouTube | LIVE STREAM LINK
Saturday Apparatus Finals 7 a.m. FIG YouTube | LIVE STREAM LINK
Sunday Apparatus Finals 7 a.m. FIG YouTube | LIVE STREAM LINK

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