Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce runs world’s fastest 100m this year

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Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce followed her unprecedented fifth world championship in the 100m by running the world’s fastest time this year at a Diamond League meet in Poland on Saturday.

Fraser-Pryce, a 35-year-old mom, clocked 10.66 seconds, one hundredth faster than she ran to win the world title in Oregon three weeks ago. She beat a field that included top Americans Aleia Hobbs (second place, 10.94), Melissa Jefferson (seventh, 11.18) and TeeTee Terry (eighth, 11.20).

It marked the third-fastest time of Fraser-Pryce’s career. Fraser-Pryce, who won the Olympic 100m in 2008 and 2012, has broken 10.70 seconds six times, all since 2017 childbirth. No other woman has broken 10.70 more than four times in a career.

Fraser-Pryce, already the oldest world champion in an individual event on the track, can in 2024 become the first woman to win three Olympic 100m titles and the oldest Olympic champion in any race on the track.

Full Diamond League results are here. The circuit moves to Monaco on Wednesday, live on Peacock.

Also in Poland, American Trayvon Bromell won the men’s 100m in 9.95 seconds into a .7 meter/second headwind. Bromell, the world 100m bronze medalist, edged training partner and world silver medalist Marvin Bracy-Williams, who ran 10.00. Fred Kerley, who led a U.S. sweep of the men’s 100m medals at worlds, did not enter the meet.

Other world champions picked up victories in Poland, including Jamaican Shericka Jackson in the 200m (21.84, distancing Olympic and world 400m champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo (22.35)), Brazilian Alison dos Santos in the 400m hurdles (47.80 in a race that didn’t have rivals Karsten Warholm and Rai Benjamin), American Michael Norman in the 400m (44.11, topping world silver medalist Kirani James by .44) and Swede Mondo Duplantis in the pole vault (6.10 meters, with world silver medalist Chris Nilsen taking fifth with a 5.53-meter clearance).

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Eliud Kipchoge breaks marathon world record in Berlin

Eliud Kipchoge Berlin Marathon
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Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge broke his own world record in winning the Berlin Marathon, clocking 2:01:09 to lower the previous record time of 2:01:39 he set in the German capital in 2018.

Kipchoge, 37 and a two-time Olympic champion, earned his 15th win in 17 career marathons to bolster his claim as the greatest runner in history over 26.2 miles.

His pacing was not ideal. Kipchoge slowed over the second half, running 61:18 for the second half after going out in 59:51 for the first 13.1 miles. He still won by 4:49 over Kenyan Mark Korir.

Ethiopian Tigist Assefa won the women’s race in 2:15:37, the third-fastest time in history. Only Brigid Kosgei (2:14:14 in Chicago in 2019) and Paula Radcliffe (2:15:25 in London in 2003) have gone faster.

American record holder Keira D’Amato, who entered as the top seed, was sixth in 2:21:48.

MORE: Berlin Marathon Results

The last eight instances the men’s marathon world record has been broken, it has come on the pancake-flat roads of Berlin. It began in 2003, when Kenyan Paul Tergat became the first man to break 2:05.

The world record was 2:02:57 — set by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto in 2014 — until Kipchoge broke it for the first time four years ago. The following year, Kipchoge became the first person to cover 26.2 miles in under two hours, doing so in a non-record-eligible showcase rather than a race.

Kipchoge’s focus going forward is trying to become the first runner to win three Olympic marathon titles in Paris in 2024. He also wants to win all six annual World Marathon Majors. He’s checked off four of them, only missing Boston (run in April) and New York City (run every November).

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2022 Berlin Marathon Results

2022 Berlin Marathon
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2022 Berlin Marathon top-10 results and notable finishers from men’s and women’s elite and wheelchair races. Full searchable results are here. ..

Men
1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) — 2:01:09 WORLD RECORD
2. Mark Korir (KEN) — 2:05:58
3. Tadu Abate (ETH) — 2:06:28
4. Andamiak Belihu (ETH) — 2:06:40
5. Abel Kipchumba (ETH) — 2:06:40
6. Limenih Getachew (ETH) — 2:07:07
7. Kenya Sonota (JPN) — 2:07:14
8. Tatsuya Maruyama (JPN) — 2:07:50
9. Kento Kikutani (JPN) — 2:07:56
10. Zablon Chumba (KEN) — 2:08:01
DNF. Guye Adola (ETH)

Women
1. Tigist Assefa (ETH) — 2:15:37
2. Rosemary Wanjiru (KEN) — 2:18:00
3. Tigist Abayechew (ETH) — 2:18:03
4. Workenesh Edesa (ETH) — 2:18:51
5. Meseret Sisay Gola (ETH) — 2:20:58
6. Keira D’Amato (USA) — 2:21:48
7. Rika Kaseda (JPN) — 2:21:55
8. Ayuko Suzuki (JPN) — 2:22:02
9. Sayaka Sato (JPN) — 2:22:13
10. Vibian Chepkirui (KEN) — 2:22:21

Wheelchair Men
1. Marcel Hug (SUI) — 1:24:56
2. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) — 1:28:54
3. David Weir (GBR) — 1:29:02
4. Jetze Plat (NED) — 1:29:06
5. Sho Watanabe (JPN) — 1:32:44
6. Patrick Monahan (IRL) — 1:32:46
7. Jake Lappin (AUS) — 1:32:50
8. Kota Hokinoue (JPN) — 1:33:45
9. Rafael Botello Jimenez (ESP) — 1:36:49
10. Jordie Madera Jimenez (ESP) — 1:36:50

Wheelchair Women
1. Catherine Debrunner (SUI) — 1:36:47
2. Manuela Schar (SUI) — 1:36:50
3. Susannah Scaroni (USA) — 1:36:51
4. Merle Menje (GER) — 1:43:34
5. Aline dos Santos Rocha (BRA) — 1:43:35
6. Madison de Rozario (BRA) — 1:43:35
7. Patricia Eachus (SUI) — 1:44:15
8. Vanessa De Souza (BRA) — 1:48:37
9. Alexandra Helbling (SUI) — 1:51:47
10. Natalie Simanowski (GER) — 2:05:09

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