2022 U.S. Open women’s singles draw, results

Iga Swiatek
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Iga Swiatek swept Ons Jabeur in the U.S. Open women’s singles final, a match between the world’s two best players in 2022, for her third Grand Slam singles title

Swiatek, the dominant world No. 1, joined Lindsay Davenport as the only women in the Open Era (since 1968) to win their first three major finals all in straight sets. At 21, she is the youngest player to win three majors since Maria Sharapova earned the third of her five in 2008.

Poland’s Swiatek added her first U.S. Open title to her French Open crowns in 2020 and 2022. She was the lone major champ to reach the quarterfinals.

Tunisia’s Jabeur was bidding to become the first African woman to win a Grand Slam singles title in the Open Era, two months after taking runner-up at Wimbledon.

Serena Williams, the Open Era record 23-time major singles champion, was the story of the first week of the U.S. Open after announcing plans to soon retire from tennis. She won her first two matches at what is expected to be her last tournament, including over No. 2 seed Anett Kontaveit, before falling to Ajla Tomljanovic.

Coco Gauff, the French Open runner-up and, at 18, the youngest player in the top 100, lost in the quarterfinals to Frenchwoman Caroline Garcia.

MORE: U.S. Open Men’s Singles Draw

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2022 U.S. Open Women’s Singles Draw

U.S. Open Women's Singles DrawU.S. Open Women's Singles DrawU.S. Open Women's Singles DrawU.S. Open Women's Singles Draw

Kaillie Humphries begins trek to 2026 Winter Olympics with monobob World Cup win

Kaillie Humphries
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Kaillie Humphries is off to a strong start to a four-year cycle that she hopes ends with her breaking the record as the oldest female Olympic bobsledder.

Humphries, the women’s record holder with three Olympic bobsled titles, earned her first World Cup victory since February’s Winter Games, taking a monobob in Park City, Utah, on Friday.

Humphries, the first Olympic monobob champion, prevailed by .31 of a second over German Lisa Buckwitz combining times from two runs at the 2002 Olympic track.

Humphries has said since February’s Olympics that she planned to take time off in this four-year cycle to start a family, then return in time for the 2026 Milano-Cortina Winter Games. Humphries, who can become the first female Olympic bobsledder in her 40s, shared her experiences with IVF in the offseason on her social media.

“We’ve pushed pause so that I could go and compete this season, maintain my world ranking to be able to still work towards my 2026 goals, and we’ll go back in March to do the implantation of the embryos that we did retrieve,” she said, according to TeamUSA.org.

The next Games come 20 years after her first Olympic experience in Italy, which was a sad one. Humphries, then a bobsled push athlete, was part of the Canadian delegation at the 2006 Torino Games, marched at the Opening Ceremony and had her parents flown in to cheer her on.

But four days before the competition, Humphries learned she was not chosen for either of the two Canadian push athlete spots. She vowed on the flight home to put her future Olympic destiny in her own hands by becoming a driver.

She has since become the greatest female driver in history — Olympic golds in 2010, 2014 and 2022, plus five world championships.

Her longtime rival, five-time Olympic medalist Elana Meyers Taylor, plans to return to competition from her second childbirth later in this Olympic cycle and can also break the record of oldest female Olympic bobsledder.

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Rosie MacLennan, Olympic trampoline legend, retires

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Canadian Rosie MacLennan, the lone person to win two Olympic trampoline gold medals, announced her retirement at age 34.

“After 10 World Championships and 4 Olympic Games, it is time for me to hang up my shiny spandex,” she posted on social media. “Trampoline has been such an integral part of my life and sport will continue to be, even if my role in sport is changing. My experience as an athlete has exceeded even my wildest childhood dreams.”

MacLennan won Olympic titles in 2012 and 2016 in an event that debuted at the 2000 Sydney Games. She was fourth at her last Olympics in Tokyo. MacLennan, Canada’s flag bearer at the 2016 Olympic Opening Ceremony, also earned world titles in 2013 and 2018 among seven world medals overall.

MacLennan came back from two concussions in 2015 — over-rotating a jump in training and later when she was accidentally hit on the head by a car trunk — to win her second Olympic title. She came back from an April 2019 broken ankle to reach her fourth Olympics.

MacLennan, who qualified for her first world age group competition at age 11, spent more than 26 years in the sport.

NBC Olympic research contributed to this report.

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