Van Dijk, Foss win road cycling worlds time trials; American OK after crash over barrier

Ellen van Dijk
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WOLLONGONG, Australia — Ellen van Dijk defended her title and claimed a third time trial gold medal at the opening event of the world road cycling championships on Sunday.

Taking advantage of a technical course at the coastal town of Wollongong, south of Sydney, van Dijk maintained a perfectly paced cadence to beat Australia’s Grace Brown by 12.79 seconds to defend the time trial gold she won last year. Swiss rival Marlen Reusser took bronze.

In the men’s event, unheralded Norwegian Tobias Foss had a shock win for his maiden world title.

In the women’s event, Brown was one of the early starters and set a blistering time of 44 minutes, 41.33 seconds around the 21.3-mile course, which none of the other 45-stong field could get close to until the final pair of van Dijk and Reusser both clocked faster at the first time check.

Reusser then faded to finish more than 41 seconds off Brown’s time, but van Dijk powered on to claim her third gold medal in a time of 44:28.60 over the two-lap circuit.

“It was the perfect course for me. (But) I never thought I would win today, actually,” said the 35-year-old who won her first gold in 2013. “I had no idea how I was riding … I paced my effort really well.

“It was nice to see Reusser a little bit ahead of me near the end, so I knew it wasn’t a bad day for sure. But I was so surprised at the finish.”

The U.S. has gone three consecutive years without a women’s time trial medalist for the first time since 2002-04.

Leah Thomas, the lone U.S. Olympian between the men’s and women’s races, and Kristen Faulkner were fifth and sixth, respectively.

Chloé Dygert, the top American road cyclist, missed worlds after last month undergoing a third left leg surgery as a result of her horrific September 2020 World Championships time trial crash.

Olympic time trial champion and two-time world champion Annemiek van Vleuten finished seventh, more than 90 seconds behind compatriot van Dijk. Van Vleuten, 39, said in June that she plans to retire after the 2023 season.

Foss clocked 40:02.95 over the same course for the biggest win of his professional career and capped a remarkable upset at the end of the opening day of the world road championships.

Most expected a gold medal showdown between Italy’s two-time defending world champion Filippo Ganna and rising star Remco Evenepoel, who last week became the first Belgian in 44 years to win a Grand Tour when he took the Vuelta a Espana.

But Evenepoel could only manage bronze, 9.16 seconds off the pace, while Swiss Stefan Kung took second at 2.95 behind Foss, who could be seen shaking his head in apparent disbelief as the more fancied rivals failed to better his time.

Ganna finished seventh, 55.32 seconds behind Foss, with Slovenian Tadej Pogacar, the two-time Tour de France champion, in sixth.

Magnus Sheffield, a 20-year-old American, was in fourth place at the last intermediate split, about 15 miles into the 21-mile course. He then crashed over a barrier and got back up to finish 17th.

“I just got a bit too greedy through one of the corners, but I think I left it all out there,” Sheffield said, according to SBS in Australia.

British rider Ethan Hayter held the lead at the first checkpoint, but he had to swap bikes when he dropped his chain and finished fourth at 39.95 seconds.

Foss’ only previous professional victories were two Norwegian time trial championships and the national road race title, but he showed his emerging potential by winning the 2019 Tour de l’Avenir.

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Eliud Kipchoge breaks marathon world record in Berlin

Eliud Kipchoge Berlin Marathon
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Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge broke his own world record in winning the Berlin Marathon, clocking 2:01:09 to lower the previous record time of 2:01:39 he set in the German capital in 2018.

Kipchoge, 37 and a two-time Olympic champion, earned his 15th win in 17 career marathons to bolster his claim as the greatest runner in history over 26.2 miles.

His pacing was not ideal. Kipchoge slowed over the second half, running 61:18 for the second half after going out in 59:51 for the first 13.1 miles. He still won by 4:49 over Kenyan Mark Korir.

Ethiopian Tigist Assefa won the women’s race in 2:15:37, the third-fastest time in history. Only Brigid Kosgei (2:14:14 in Chicago in 2019) and Paula Radcliffe (2:15:25 in London in 2003) have gone faster.

American record holder Keira D’Amato, who entered as the top seed, was sixth in 2:21:48.

MORE: Berlin Marathon Results

The last eight instances the men’s marathon world record has been broken, it has come on the pancake-flat roads of Berlin. It began in 2003, when Kenyan Paul Tergat became the first man to break 2:05.

The world record was 2:02:57 — set by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto in 2014 — until Kipchoge broke it for the first time four years ago. The following year, Kipchoge became the first person to cover 26.2 miles in under two hours, doing so in a non-record-eligible showcase rather than a race.

Kipchoge’s focus going forward is trying to become the first runner to win three Olympic marathon titles in Paris in 2024. He also wants to win all six annual World Marathon Majors. He’s checked off four of them, only missing Boston (run in April) and New York City (run every November).

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2022 Berlin Marathon Results

2022 Berlin Marathon
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2022 Berlin Marathon top-10 results and notable finishers from men’s and women’s elite and wheelchair races. Full searchable results are here. ..

Men
1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) — 2:01:09 WORLD RECORD
2. Mark Korir (KEN) — 2:05:58
3. Tadu Abate (ETH) — 2:06:28
4. Andamiak Belihu (ETH) — 2:06:40
5. Abel Kipchumba (ETH) — 2:06:40
6. Limenih Getachew (ETH) — 2:07:07
7. Kenya Sonota (JPN) — 2:07:14
8. Tatsuya Maruyama (JPN) — 2:07:50
9. Kento Kikutani (JPN) — 2:07:56
10. Zablon Chumba (KEN) — 2:08:01
DNF. Guye Adola (ETH)

Women
1. Tigist Assefa (ETH) — 2:15:37
2. Rosemary Wanjiru (KEN) — 2:18:00
3. Tigist Abayechew (ETH) — 2:18:03
4. Workenesh Edesa (ETH) — 2:18:51
5. Meseret Sisay Gola (ETH) — 2:20:58
6. Keira D’Amato (USA) — 2:21:48
7. Rika Kaseda (JPN) — 2:21:55
8. Ayuko Suzuki (JPN) — 2:22:02
9. Sayaka Sato (JPN) — 2:22:13
10. Vibian Chepkirui (KEN) — 2:22:21

Wheelchair Men
1. Marcel Hug (SUI) — 1:24:56
2. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) — 1:28:54
3. David Weir (GBR) — 1:29:02
4. Jetze Plat (NED) — 1:29:06
5. Sho Watanabe (JPN) — 1:32:44
6. Patrick Monahan (IRL) — 1:32:46
7. Jake Lappin (AUS) — 1:32:50
8. Kota Hokinoue (JPN) — 1:33:45
9. Rafael Botello Jimenez (ESP) — 1:36:49
10. Jordie Madera Jimenez (ESP) — 1:36:50

Wheelchair Women
1. Catherine Debrunner (SUI) — 1:36:47
2. Manuela Schar (SUI) — 1:36:50
3. Susannah Scaroni (USA) — 1:36:51
4. Merle Menje (GER) — 1:43:34
5. Aline dos Santos Rocha (BRA) — 1:43:35
6. Madison de Rozario (BRA) — 1:43:35
7. Patricia Eachus (SUI) — 1:44:15
8. Vanessa De Souza (BRA) — 1:48:37
9. Alexandra Helbling (SUI) — 1:51:47
10. Natalie Simanowski (GER) — 2:05:09

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