Alberto Salazar

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Alberto Salazar suspended by SafeSport

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Track coach Alberto Salazar is temporarily suspended by the U.S. Center for SafeSport for unspecified allegations of misconduct.

SafeSport is tasked with investigating abuse claims in Olympic sports.

Salazar was previously banned four years by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency for doping violations linked to the Nike Oregon Project track group. USADA said Salazar ran experiments with supplements and testosterone, and possessed and trafficked the banned substance.

The case also related to falsified and incomplete medical records that disguised the work.

Salazar appealed that ban, which was handed down Oct. 1.

In November, ex-Oregon Project runner Mary Cain alleged physical and emotional abuse by Salazar when he was her coach. Salazar defended himself, according to the Oregonian.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

MORE: Mary Cain raises issues from being coached by Salazar

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Alberto Salazar appeals doping ban

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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — The Court of Arbitration for Sport says it has registered an appeal by track coach Alberto Salazar against his ban for doping violations, though a hearing will take several months to prepare.

CAS says Salazar and Dr. Jeffrey Brown appealed against their four-year bans by the United States Anti-Doping Agency.

After a multi-year USADA investigation, Salazar and Brown were found guilty of doping violations linked to the Nike Oregon Project training camp. USADA said Salazar ran experiments with supplements and testosterone, and possessed and trafficked the banned substance.

The case also related to falsified and incomplete medical records that disguised the work.

CAS says Salazar and Brown asked for more time to file “written submissions and evidence,” adding the hearing is “unlikely to take place before March.”

Verdicts typically take at least a further several weeks.

MORE: Mary Cain raises issues from being coached by Salazar

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Alberto Salazar, Mary Cain and Nike issue statements after Cain revelations

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After Mary Cain alleged physical and emotional abuse during her time working with coach Alberto Salazar at the Nike Oregon Project, Salazar and Nike released statements saying Cain had not raised such issues before and was even interested in returning earlier this year.

Cain responded, acknowledging that she had still believed she could improve her relationship with Salazar.

Nike stressed that Cain’s allegations were new and the company pledged to delve further into them.

“These are deeply troubling allegations which have not been raised by Mary or her parents before,” Nike said in a statement. “Mary was seeking to rejoin the Oregon Project and Alberto’s team as recently as April of this year and had not raised these concerns as part of that process. We take the allegations extremely seriously and will launch an immediate investigation to hear from former Oregon Project athletes. At Nike we seek to always put the athlete at the center of everything we do, and these allegations are completely inconsistent with our values.”

Salazar, in a statement to The Oregonian, said Cain’s father, a medical doctor, had been continually informed on Cain’s health regimens. He also reiterated his claim that, despite his four-year ban by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, he has never asked an athlete to take a banned substance.

Cain said she did indeed think she could find a way back to her old team and was in contact with Salazar. But contact between Cain and Salazar diminished, she said, and the USADA suspension of the coach helped her find her voice.

“No more wanting them to like me,” Cain said. “No more needing their approval. I could finally look at the facts, read others stories, and face: THIS SYSTEM WAS NOT OK.”

Last night, Cain described her growing willingness to share her story in an NBC Nightly News interview.

“I couldn’t have sat in front of a camera and told my story, and told it with power, before today,” she said.

Cain also spoke again with The New York Times, where she gave her initial statement, and described her conflicted emotions of “wanting to be free from him and wanting to go back to the way things used to be.”

Several athletes once associated with Nike and Salazar have either corroborated the treatment Cain described or said they experienced it themselves.

Some of the athletes speaking publicly on Cain’s behalf were also whistle-blowers who had spoken about Salazar and doping issues over the years, facing what they described as personal and professional setbacks as a result of their testimony.

Salazar has pledged to appeal his suspension to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. The case is not yet on the organization’s list of upcoming hearings.

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