Brian Orser

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Yevgenia Medvedeva to be coached by Brian Orser

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After a rocky breakup with her longtime Russian coach, Olympic silver medalist Yevgenia Medvedeva will train under 1984 and 1988 Olympic silver medalist Brian Orser in Toronto.

“I hope that time will pass and everyone will understand that this was the only possible option,” Medvedeva said Monday, according to an Associated Press translation.

Orser coached South Korean Yuna Kim to 2010 Olympic gold, plus Japanese Yuzuru Hanyu to a pair of Olympic and world titles and Spaniard Javier Fernandez to two world crowns. Medvedeva first reached out to Orser on April 2, according to Icenetwork.com.

“I want to have a long career, and this is why such changes are taking place in my life,” Medvedeva said, according to a TASS translation. “You cannot even imagine how upbeat I feel at the moment, and I am motivated now like never before.”

Medvedeva, 18, had been guided by Eteri Tutberidze since age 7. She won the 2015 World junior title and senior world titles in 2016 and 2017, going undefeated for two years in the most dominant stretch in women’s singles skating since Katarina Witt in the 1980s.

Medvedeva was surpassed by 15-year-old training partner Alina Zagitova in the winter, taking second to Zagitova at the European Championships in January and the Olympics in February.

Medvedeva reportedly declined to comment Monday on Tutberidze’s suggestion that Medvedeva, at the Olympics, asked the coach why Zagitova could not have remained a junior this past season and thus not compete in PyeongChang.

“I learned many life lessons from [Tutberidze],” Medvedeva said, according to an AP translation. “I will remember it all my life.”

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Yuzuru Hanyu out for ‘revenge’ at World Championships

Yuzuru Hanyu
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BOSTON — Yuzuru Hanyu, the smiling, laughing Japanese Olympic champion said Monday that he’s seeking “revenge” at the World Championships this week.

“Because I lost last year in this competition, I feel like I have to revenge,” Hanyu, who sometimes speaks English in interviews, said after his first practice at TD Garden.

A translator stood next to him, but Hanyu chose to let his own words in his non-native language do the talking.

“I feel good, this practice,” Hanyu said. “I don’t know if I’ll be feeling good in competition in a sold-out arena.”

Hanyu entered the 2015 World Championships as the reigning Olympic, World and Grand Prix Final champion.

That stat belied a tumultuous 2014-15 season, when Hanyu collided violently with a skater in a November warm-up, then fell five times in his performance less than an hour later and had his Worlds prep interrupted by bladder surgery.

Hanyu led after the 2015 Worlds short program in Shanghai but uncharacteristically landed zero quadruple jumps in his free skate, falling on his lone attempt as his Spanish training partner Javier Fernandez overtook him for gold.

Hanyu could be seen clapping for Fernandez when the Spaniard’s winning score came up, but his competitive desire was evident in his word choice Monday.

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This season, Hanyu put up the two highest total scores under the decade-old scoring system, beating Fernandez by a whopping 37.48 points in their only head-to-head in December. There, Hanyu and Fernandez both landed three quads.

Fernandez said Monday that he felt he had a chance to repeat this week if he and Hanyu both skated to the best of their abilities. That contradicts what he reportedly said before arriving in Boston.

“At this point, if we both skate clean, clean, clean, I will say he will beat me,” Fernandez said, according to an Icenetwork article published last week.

Their shared coach, Canadian 1988 Olympic silver medalist Brian Orser, refused to pick a favorite.

“Technically, they’re both the same as far as the jumping,” Orser said Monday. “Hanyu’s spins are a bit better, but I think Javi’s steps are better. … It would be hard to be on the [judges] panel to make that call. And I certainly would never make that call. You ain’t getting that from me.”

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