Brianna Rollins

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Caster Semenya, hurdles showdown headline Diamond League opener

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Caster Semenya races internationally for the first time since last week’s IAAF testosterone announcement at the season-opening Diamond League meet in Doha, live on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA and NBC Sports Gold on Friday.

Live coverage begins at 11:15 a.m. ET on NBC Sports Gold’s “Track and Field Pass” (commercial-free) and noon on Olympic Channel. NBCSN will air coverage Saturday at 2:30 p.m.

Semenya, the Olympic 800m champion, is entered in the 1500m in Doha against a field lacking any of the other top seven finishers from the 2016 Olympics or 2017 Worlds. Semenya took 1500m bronze at last year’s worlds.

Semenya has not commented publicly on last week’s IAAF announcement that women with high testosterone must reduce those levels by Nov. 1 or will not be allowed in international races between 400m and the mile. South Africa’s Olympic Committee said Semenya, whom track officials mandated undergo gender testing in 2009, is expected to be affected by the ruling.

While Semenya is the standout name in Doha, several other events feature stronger head-to-head matchups, including reigning Olympic and world champions.

Here are the Doha entry lists. Here’s the schedule of events (all times Eastern):

11:10 a.m. — Women’s Pole Vault
11:15 — Women’s Discus
11:50 — Men’s Triple Jump
Noon — Men’s High Jump
12:03 — Men’s 400m
12:13 — Women’s 1500m
12:26 — Women’s 100m
12:35 — Men’s 3000m Steeplechase
12:50 — Men’s Javelin
12:53 — Men’s 400m Hurdles
1:02 — Men’s 1500m
1:15 — Women’s 100m Hurdles
1:25 — Men’s 800m
1:36 — Men’s 200m
1:45 — Women’s 3000m

Here are five events to watch:

Women’s 1500m — 12:13 p.m. ET
Semenya has two defeats in about 20 international meets since the start of 2016, according to Tilastopaja.org. It would be a shock if she gets a third here. Semenya owns the two fastest times of the year in her complementary event. None of the other star 1500m runners — like Olympic and world champion Faith Kipyegon (pregnancy), Olympic and world medalist Jenny Simpson (racing the 3000m in Doha) and world-record holder Genzebe Dibaba — are in this field.

Women’s 100m — 12:26 p.m. ET
Four of the top five sprinters from the 2017 World Championships, missing only gold medalist Tori Bowie. Watch Olympic champion Elaine Thompson, whose only 100m defeat since the start of 2016 came at the 2017 Worlds. But the Jamaican was fourth this year in the world indoor championships 60m and the Commonwealth Games 200m.

Men’s Javelin — 12:50 p.m. ET
Probably the strongest Doha field at the top with the top four from the 2017 World Championships. Germany has the reigning Olympic champion (Thomas Roehler) and world champion (Johannes Vetter), who combined for the top six throws in the world last year. Last year in Doha, Roehler recorded the world’s farthest throw in 20 years, only to see Vetter go farther two months later.

Women’s 100m Hurdles — 1:15 p.m. ET
The five fastest Americans over the last 13 years are in this field — world-record holder Kendra Harrison, 2016 Olympic champion Brianna McNeal, Sharika NelvisJasmin Stowers and 2008 Olympic champion Dawn Harper-Nelson. It’s the third time these five women will race together. McNeal races internationally for the first time since leading a U.S. sweep in Rio and then sitting out all of 2017 for missing three drug tests (though never failing one). Harper-Nelson races for the first time since announcing she will retire at the end of the season. Harrison’s only defeats since the start of 2016 were at the Olympic trials and world championships.

Men’s 200m — 1:36 p.m. ET
An intriguing group including surprise world champion Ramil Guliyev of Turkey, Olympic silver medalist Andre De Grasse of Canada, Olympic 110m hurdles champion Omar McLeod, promising American Noah Lyles and Jereem Richards of Trinidad and Tobago. With Usain Bolt retired and Wayde van Niekerk absent and coming off a knee tear, there is no clear-cut king of the 200m at the moment.

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Brianna Rollins, Olympic hurdles champ, banned one year in strange case

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Olympic 100m hurdles champion Brianna Rollins is banned for the entire 2017 track season for what she said was confusion regarding a computer system.

Rollins accepted full responsibility for her mistakes in a statement Thursday. She said the one-year ban, backdated to Dec. 19, was “as a result of my confusion over how the [drug-testing] whereabouts program worked.”

Rollins was not present for three random, out-of-competition drug tests in 2016, which constitutes a two-year ban under anti-doping rules. Rollins had that ban reduced by an arbitration panel to the shortest possible length — one year — given the circumstances and her drug-free record.

Two of the three missed tests came in September, one month after Rollins led a U.S. 100m hurdles sweep in Rio.

Rollins was in her Florida hometown to celebrate “Brianna Rollins Day” on Sept. 13. Two weeks later, she went to visit the White House with the U.S. Olympic team.

Drug testers showed up at Rollins’ Georgia home during both trips, but she wasn’t present as she previously stated that she would be. If Rollins had updated drug testers on her travel to Florida and Washington, D.C., as athletes are required to do, she would have avoided the missed tests.

A three-member arbitration panel stressed that Rollins is a clean athlete, showing “no evidence of avoiding testing, masking drug use, or using drugs.”

Rollins passed all 16 drug tests she took last year, but it’s the three tests that she was not present for that led to her ban.

Under U.S. Anti-Doping Agency rules, elite American athletes must provide a daily one-hour window for random testing, giving a specific location for drug testers to track them down.

If they have a change in plans, they must notify USADA.

Rollins conceded her negligence for the two September missed tests.

She disputed her first missed test from April 27, citing confusion in filling out her whereabouts on a computer program.

Rollins thought she had sufficiently updated her whereabouts for traveling to a meet in Iowa, but she failed to update the system that she would not be at her Georgia home during her daily one-hour window April 27.

A drug tester showed up at her Georgia home that morning, but Rollins was not present.

The three-member panel wrote in a 32-page summary that the computer system and the agencies connected with it “failed to design it to assist the athletes as much as possible to avoid confusion.” The panel also said Rollins still “failed to show a complete absence of negligence.”

“This is a difficult case because it involves the imposition of a serious penalty on a brilliant athlete who is not charged or suspected of using banned substances of any kind,” the panel wrote. “However, while there is much at stake for [Rollins], there is not much in dispute as to the facts or law of this case.”

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Team USA women sweep women’s 100 hurdles, Rollins takes gold

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Four years after taking silver and bronze in the women’s 100 hurdles, USA Track and Field did even better Wednesday night.

Americans swept the medals, with Brianna Rollins taking gold with a time of 12.48 seconds. Rollins took gold in this event at the 2013 World Championships, and she won the race at the U.S. Olympic Trials in early July as well. While Rollins won gold in comfortable fashion, the race for silver and bronze was much closer.

WATCH: U.S. women sweep 100 meter hurdles

Taking silver was Nia Ali with a time of 12.59 seconds, with Kristi Castlin’s time of 12.61 seconds being good enough for bronze. Castlin beat out Great Britain’s Cindy Ofili by just two one-hundredths of a second. Germany’s Cindy Roleder, who took silver in the 100 hurdles at last year’s World Championships, finished fifth.

Abrahamson: First time ever, U.S. women 1-2-3 in track and field event

The U.S. took silver and bronze in the 100 hurdles in London, and shortly after tonight’s race Lolo Jones sent out a tweet referring to that race. Jones finished fourth in London.