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London Marathon preview; runners to watch

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World records are under threat from male and female runners at the London Marathon on Sunday (3:30 a.m. ET, NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold).

The forecast calls for the warmest London Marathon in its 38-year history (a high Sunday in the low 70s, though likely cooler for the morning start times).

The elite fields, stronger than for last Monday’s Boston Marathon, include the greatest marathoners of this generation — Eliud Kipchoge and Mary Keitany — plus arguably each Kenyan’s top rival at the moment.

Five runners to watch in each field …

Eliud Kipchoge, Kenya
2016 Olympic champ
2015, 2016 London Marathon winner
Ran 2:00:25 in Nike’s sub-two-hour marathon attempt last May

In Kipchoge’s last start in London, he missed countryman Dennis Kimetto‘s world record by eight seconds, prevailing in 2:03:05 in 2016. Since, Kipchoge won the Olympic title, had what he deemed his greatest performance in the sub-two-hour (non-record-eligible) event and extended his marathon win streak to seven races over four years in rainy, humid Berlin last September. The 33-year-old has refused to get into world-record talk, telling media he just wants to run “a beautiful race” Sunday.

Kenenisa Bekele, Ethiopia
Second-fastest marathoner of all time (Berlin 2016, 2:03:03)
World-record holder in 5000m, 10,000m
Eight Olympic/world titles in 5000m, 10,000m

Credentials from 5000m to marathon make a strong case that Bekele is the greatest runner of all time, ahead of Usain Bolt and Kipchoge. He really started taking aim at the world record after that 2016 Berlin breakthrough. Bekele was runner-up with foot blisters in London last year, nearly three minutes slower than in Germany, and failed to finish his other two marathons in 2017. “To have the records for 5000m to marathon would be something – no one else has done that. I feel like that would make me the greatest ever,” Bekele said, according to marathon organizers.

Mo Farah, Great Britain
2012, 2016 Olympic champ in 5000m/10,000m
Second marathon
8th at 2014 London Marathon

Farah’s primary goal Sunday is modest in comparison to Kipchoge and Bekele — break the British marathon record of 2:07:13. Farah, repeating in a press conference Tuesday that he is ranked 27th in the world in the distance, said he still intends to go out with the leaders even if they start on world-record pace. It’s his first marathon since switching full-time to road running after last season and his second overall after his 2:08:21 in London four years ago.

Guye Adola, Ethiopia
Second to Kipchoge at 2017 Berlin Marathon in 26.2-mile debut

Adola came out of nowhere to finish 14 seconds behind Kipchoge in Berlin on Sept. 24 in the fastest-ever marathon debut on a record-eligible course, sticking with Kipchoge until the last mile. Afterward, we learned Adola didn’t know he was running until four days before the race and wasn’t meant to start with the elite group. The 27-year-old was second and fifth in half marathons in January and February, not particularly impressive.

Daniel Wanjiru, Kenya
2017 London Marathon winner

Wanjiru won his major marathon debut last year, then returned to London for the world championships on Aug. 6 and was eighth. Neither of those fields was as strong as Sunday’s is shaping up to be. Just 25, Wanjiru will be tested like never before.

Mary Keitany, Kenya
2011, 2012, 2017 London Marathon winner
Ran fastest marathon by a woman without male pacers
2014, 2015, 2016 New York City Marathon winner

The 5-foot-2 mother of two smashed Paula Radcliffe‘s women-only world record by 41 seconds in London last year, clocking 2:17:01. She’ll run with male pacers Sunday in a bid to break Radcliffe’s world record of 2:15:25 from the 2003 London Marathon (the first time since 2003 London has male pacers for the women’s race). Keitany was stunned by Shalane Flanagan at her last marathon in New York City in November but came back in February to lower her half marathon personal best. “I’ve had Paula’s record in mind since I started my career,” the 36-year-old Keitany said.

Tirunesh Dibaba, Ethiopia
2017 Chicago Marathon winner
2017 London Marathon runner-up
Third-fastest female marathoner of all time
Eight Olympic/world titles in 5000m/10,000m

The Baby-Faced Destroyer is the only woman in the field whose personal best is within two minutes of Keitany’s. There’s reason to believe she can be closer to Keitany than last year (55 seconds behind, and that’s after stopping briefly with two miles left with stomach problems). Dibaba is four years younger than Keitany, with a decorated track background and just one year into her full-time marathon career.

Gladys Cherono, Kenya
2015, 2017 Berlin Marathon winner

The woman with the third-fastest personal best in the field has never raced London and was fifth in her only major marathon outside of Berlin. She was eighth in a half marathon in February, more than two minutes behind Keitany.

Rose Chelimo, Bahrain
2017 World champion
2017 Boston Marathon runner-up

Impressive second year as a marathoner in 2017. Chelimo, 28, was born in Kenya but switched to Bahrain in 2015. Though this is her London Marathon debut, her world title came in London in August. She did not impress at the world half marathon championships last month, finishing 14th overall and fifth among runners from Bahrain.

Vivian Cheruiyot, Kenya
Fourth at 2017 London Marathon in 26.2-mile debut
Four Olympic medals in 5000m/10,000m
Four world championships in 5000m/10,000m

Credentials similar to but not quite as impressive as Dibaba in terms of track medals, early marathon experience and age (34 to Dibaba’s 32). Cheruiyot finished more than five minutes behind Keitany and Dibaba in her 26.2-mile debut in London last year. She dropped out of the New York City Half Marathon on March 18 with a breathing problem in the cold weather but insisted she’s healthy for Sunday.

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U.S. Olympians bid for rare double podium at Boston Marathon

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The U.S. contingent at the Boston Marathon spans the spectrum of elite runners.

Meb Keflezighi races the world’s oldest annual 26.2-mile race for the final time as an elite athlete. Galen Rupp and Jordan Hasay will toe the line in Hopkinton in their city marathon debuts. Desi Linden is at her fifth Boston Marathon, but for the first time as the clear U.S. women’s headliner.

There is a decent chance that either Rupp or Keflezighi (or Olympians Jared Ward or Abdi Abdirahman) finishes in the men’s top three on Monday (NBC Sports broadcast details here). Linden and Hasay could also be in proverbial podium contention in the women’s race.

The U.S. has put male and female runners in the top three of the same Boston Marathon just once since 1985, when Ryan Hall and Kara Goucher each placed third in 2009.

This could be another banner year for the Stars and Stripes.

Keflezighi, 41, is on his 25th career marathon and his fifth in Boston. In 2014, he surprisingly won this race, emotionally, one year after it was scarred by twin bombings on Boylston Street.

Keflezighi, who immigrated to the U.S. from war-torn Eritrea via Italy in 1987, has two more marathons in his legs before he ends his elite career: Boston and New York City this fall.

Keflezighi’s recent results do not portend more success in Boston. He was 33rd in the Rio Olympic marathon, stopping seven times during the race due to stomach problems.

In races this year, Keflezighi posted the two slowest half-marathon times of his career, slowed by Achilles inflammation that he says is behind him.

But the 2004 Olympic silver medalist has been counted out before, only to come back for stunning wins in New York City in 2009 and Boston in 2014. Keflezighi said Friday he would be delighted with a top-10 finish.

“Every race I enter, people expect me to win,” he said. “The mind can still think it, though, but the body can’t. Be competitive, and see what happens.”

Rupp, like Keflezighi, did not have ideal race lead-up to Boston.

Rupp withdrew before January’s Houston Half Marathon with plantar fasciitis in his left foot. Two weeks ago, he spoke of left foot discomfort after finishing 11th in a half marathon in Prague.

“I’ve been pain-free now for a couple weeks,” Rupp said Friday, citing the benefits of a cortisone shot April 3.

Boston will mark the third marathon for Rupp, the 2012 Olympic silver medalist and American record holder in the 10,000m.

He won the Olympic Trials in his marathon debut last February and then took bronze in Rio.

In Boston, a healthy Rupp is instantly a podium contender in a shallow international men’s field compared to the London Marathon on April 23.

The following marathoners are NOT racing in Boston — Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge, Olympic silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa, Berlin winner Kenenisa Bekele, Tokyo winner Wilson Kipsang, New York City winner Ghirmay Ghebreslassie and London runner-up Stanley Biwott.

Only two men in the Boston field have won a major marathon in the last four years — Keflezighi and defending Boston champion Lemi Berhanu Hayle of Ethiopia.

If neither Rupp nor Keflezighi is strong on Monday, it could open the door for two other Americans.

Abdirahman, 40 and a four-time Olympian, stunned to finish third in New York City on Nov. 6. Ward finished third behind Rupp and Keflezighi at the Olympic Trials and then sixth in Rio.

In the women’s race, there are fewer American podium possibilities — really just Linden and Hasay. The international women’s field is also stronger than the men’s field.

Linden, 33, has come a long way since running 2:44:56 in her marathon debut in Boston a decade ago (in a race with weather so adverse that cancellation was considered).

She came out of nowhere to lead the 2011 Boston Marathon in the final half-mile on Boylston Street, but finished two seconds behind Kenyan winner Caroline Kilel.

Linden dropped out of her first Olympic marathon in 2012 (hip flexor) but finished in the top five of major marathons each of the next three years. She was second at last year’s Olympic Trials and then a respectable seventh in Rio.

Olympic redemption behind her, Linden aims at returning to the major marathon podium. More than that. Her goal is to become the first U.S. female runner to win Boston since 1985.

“If I’m in the position to get the win, I want to have thought it out and not be surprised by it and not be afraid of it,” Linden told media Friday. “So that’s part of stating that goal out loud.”

Hasay, a former teen prodigy, might have podium aspirations in her first marathon. Hasay made the 2008 Olympic Trials 1500m final at age 16 but, in 2012 and 2016 had a best track trials finish of ninth.

The Alberto Salazar pupil may have found her niche in road racing. She became the third U.S. woman to break 68 minutes in the half marathon on April 1 in Prague. The other two, Deena Kastor and Molly Huddle, have made a major marathon podium (or won, in Kastor’s case).

“I don’t know how I’m going to stack up against the field,” Hasay said Friday. “Sorry, I’m being really vague, but we don’t want to really say a set time or a set place, because I just don’t want to have those expectations.

“I feel like I’m still just a little kid, and I want to ask all these ambassadors for their autographs.”

Linden and Hasay will have to topple an experienced women’s field to make that podium.

It includes the last three Boston winners — Ethiopians Atsede Baysa and Buzunesh Deba and Kenyan Caroline Rotich. Plus, two more women who have run sub-2:20 — Kenyans Edna Kiplagat and favorite Gladys Cherono.

Linden’s best is 2:22:38 from 2011 Boston. The Boston course record is 2:19:59 (Deba).

“Usually, a 2:22-2:24 type performance wins this race, and I can do that here,” Linden said. “So, there’s no reason to think I can’t be in it.”

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Eliud Kipchoge misses marathon world record by 63 seconds with shoe malfunction

Eliud Kipchoge
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BERLIN (AP) — Wayward insoles cost Eliud Kipchoge a chance to break a world record.

Despite problems with his shoes from the first kilometer, Kipchoge won the Berlin Marathon on Sunday in a personal best time of 2 hours, 4 minutes.

The Kenyan’s insoles were noticeably slipping out of his runners around the 20K mark, flapping behind him as he maintained a leading pace with training partner Emmanuel Mutai and 2012 race winner Geoffrey Mutai.

Geoffrey Mutai, no relation to Emmanuel, fell behind around the 30K mark and Kipchoge made his move two kilometers further on.

“I didn’t have time to pull the soles out,” said Kipchoge, who had been targeting compatriot Dennis Kimetto’s world record of 2:02:57 from Berlin last year. “The world record was my target. I didn’t manage it but I’ll be back next year.”

Running his sixth Berlin marathon, Kipchoge finished comfortably ahead of compatriot Eliud Kiptanui in second on 2:05:22 and Feyisa Lilesa of Ethiopia third in 2:06:57. All times were official.

“From the first kilometer I had problems with my shoes,” Kipchoge said. “Nevertheless, I am very happy about my victory. I love the Berlin course and the people. I’m glad I won and in a personal best. I would very much love to come back and run an even faster time.”

Emmanuel Mutai was fourth and Geoffrey Mutai fifth, ahead of Canada’s Reid Coolseat, who ran 2:10:28.

Kipchoge shaved five seconds off his previous personal best time and 42 seconds off the previous fastest mark of the year that he set at the London Marathon on April 26.

Despite acknowledging that he “could have run faster,” Kipchoge laid no fault with his sponsor for his footwear issues.

“I tested the shoe, I tested many pairs of Nike. I think this shoe is the best shoe ever. The shoe is good,” the 30-year-old said. “The sole was not glued. I used the same pair in Kenya and it was good.”

Kiptanui was happy with his second-place finish.

“I think I had no chance to beat Eliud,” said Kiptanui, who knocked 17 seconds off his personal best set in Prague in 2010.

Kipchoge clocked 2:04:05 in 2013 only to be beaten by compatriot Wilson Kipsang, who set a then-record of 2:03:23.

Gladys Cherono of Kenya beat the 2:20 mark to win the women’s race in 2:19.25 ahead of Ethiopian trio Aberu Kebede, Meseret Hailu and Tadelech Bekele.

It was Cherono’s first win in only her second marathon. The 32-year-old half marathon world champion ran 2:20:03 for second place in her debut in Dubai last January.

Conditions were ideal on a cool, crisp autumn morning in Berlin. More than 41,000 runners from 131 countries were registered to run.

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