Hope Solo

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Hope Solo: U.S. needs a goalkeeper, but I would need an answer

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NEW YORK — Hope Solo hasn’t retired — “It’s hard to retire when you got fired,” she repeated Tuesday, referencing her 2016-17 U.S. Soccer suspension and contract termination — but she also would not return to the U.S. national team under the current state.

“If Jill came to me today, Jill Ellis, the coach of the women’s team, and said, ‘Hope, we need a goalkeeper,’ — which they do — ‘can you come back and help us win the World Cup?’ I’d say to her, ‘Are you guys abiding by federal law?'” Solo said at the Hashtag Sports event in Manhattan. “That’s the only question I have to ask back and see what the answer is. We all know that they are not abiding by federal law, so I can not stand for that at this point.”

In January, Solo filed a complaint against U.S. Soccer with the U.S. Olympic Committee, accusing it of illegally favoring Major League Soccer. On Tuesday, she called the current labor agreement agreed to in April 2017 as “eye candy,” saying it yielded more pay for female players but fewer players on contract.

Solo, 36, has not played for club or country since she was suspended six months by U.S. Soccer in August 2016 after she called Sweden’s national team “a bunch of cowards” after beating the Americans in the Rio Olympic quarterfinals.

She was the No. 1 goalie for the U.S. at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics and 2007, 2011 and 2015 World Cups, taking two Olympic gold medals and a World Cup title and compiling 202 caps.

“If I didn’t have that World Cup victory, I’m not sure I could have ever left the game,” Solo said Tuesday. “I would have been back on the field at all costs. But I got my World Cup victory, and, for me as a young girl, more than the Olympics, that’s something I needed in my life, that I always wanted to accomplish. If I hadn’t had that, then I’m not sure I’d be happy with my career.”

Solo said she would “be perfectly happy out of the public eye” living on her 60 acres of North Carolina farmland with husband Jerramy Stevens. She was adamant that she would not run for U.S. Soccer president again, as she did unsuccessfully last winter.

Solo has said she has turned down offers to play overseas and would not return to the National Women’s Soccer League because it is run by U.S. Soccer.

“For me, competing means competing at the highest level,” said Solo, who in 2020 will be older than any previous U.S. Olympic soccer player. “That would be the World Cup. That would be the Olympics. And if I can’t play for my country, then it’s hard for me to go move to France and play professional league soccer when I want to play for my country. I want to play in World Cups and Olympics.

“If I went back and played club ball, it would be in Europe.”

And does she she herself ever doing that?

“I don’t shut out opportunities, so who knows,” Solo said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Hope Solo settles grievance with U.S. Soccer

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Hope Solo has settled a grievance with U.S. Soccer over her suspension from the women’s national team following comments she made at the Rio Olympics.

The settlement was first reported by the San Francisco Chronicle. The 35-year-old goalkeeper was suspended for six months and her contract with the federation was terminated after she called the Swedish team “a bunch of cowards” following the U.S. team’s quarterfinal loss.

Details about the settlement, reached last month, were not released. The U.S. Women’s Soccer Team Players Association filed the grievance on Solo’s behalf.

In a statement provided Friday to The Associated Press, Solo reiterated her regret over the comments.

“As I expressed in my apology to the Swedish captain immediately following the match, I have tremendous respect for the Swedish team, and in describing the style of play, I used a choice of words that was both offensive and not at all what I had intended to convey,” she said.

“We have amicably resolved the matter and are moving forward in a positive way,” she added.

U.S. Soccer did not immediately respond to requests for comment. The Women’s Soccer Team Players Association declined to comment.

Solo anchored the team in goal for the 2015 Women’s World Cup victory, allowing just three goals in seven games with five shutouts during the tournament — earning her a second straight Golden Glove Award.

For her career, Solo has made 202 total appearances with the national team, with 153 wins and an international-record 102 shutouts.

The defending champion U.S. women were ousted from the Olympics last summer when Sweden advanced 4-3 on penalty kicks following a 1-1 draw.

Solo’s “cowards” quote came immediately following the loss. Sweden went on to lose the gold-medal match to Germany.

Solo told the AP late last year that she spoke to coach Jill Ellis and U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati following the loss, and felt that the issue was put to rest. After she returned to the United States, she said she was blindsided by the announcement about her suspension.

She said she believes U.S. Soccer wanted her off negotiations for a new collective bargaining agreement. Solo has been an outspoken advocate for equal pay and was among the players who filed a complaint against the federation with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging wage discrimination.

“Let’s call it what is, which is a firing,” Solo told AP then. “It was a termination of my contract effective immediately with severance. That is a firing. It wasn’t a suspension, that’s what they told the media because it looked better. But I got fired. I got fired for what they say was using the word ‘cowards’ but in reality they got rid of an adversary in the fight for equal pay.”

U.S. Soccer said at the time that Solo was suspended following a culmination of actions, and separately her contract was also terminated with the team.

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Hope Solo, not retiring, apologized to Sweden captain after ‘cowards’ comment

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Hope Solo, who is not retiring, said a Sweden co-captain told her she didn’t need to apologize for her comments calling the Swedes “a bunch of cowards” following the U.S.’ quarterfinal loss at the Rio Olympics.

Solo, a 35-year-old suspended until February by U.S. Soccer, said she spoke to Swedish co-captain Lotta Schelin shortly after the Aug. 12 match that ended in penalty kicks. Solo and Schelin were once club teammates for a Swedish league team in 2004.

“I said to her, ‘You know, Lotta, I said something. I used the word “cowards” when talking about you guys, and I didn’t mean that. I’m so sorry,'” Solo said in a Swedish interview published Friday. “And she was like, ‘Oh, I know you, don’t worry about it. Don’t worry about it.’ And she’s like, ‘Look, the American team has been in the last five championship games in the Olympics. Five championships.’ And she’s like, ‘We never have.’ She’s like, ‘So, for us to beat a better-skilled team like Brazil and like America, we had to drop back defensively.’ And she knew it, but for the most part, we just hugged and we laughed and she accepted my apology. She didn’t even think I needed to apologize.”

Solo said she wasn’t enraged, emotional or angry when she made the “cowards” comments to journalists after the match.

“I’m not a loose cannon, like I think the media projects,” Solo said. “I didn’t mean to come across that the players were cowards or the coach was a coward. I meant the style of play, it wasn’t very Olympic-spirited.

“I think Lotta Schelin, No. 8, the captain for Sweden of course, is one of the best players in the world — one of the best attacking players in the world. So it was really difficult to watch her drop back defensively, and I saw her, most of the time, in the 18-yard box in her defense.

“And I wanted her to attack me, I wanted to play against Lotta. I wanted to try to stop her shots. I love the competitive nature between America and Sweden. It was a little disappointing to see them drop back to the 50-yard line to play defense.”

Solo added that she has not spoken with Swedish coach Pia Sundhage, the former U.S. women’s national team coach, since the match.

“She coaches the other team, so it’s kind of hard to speak to Pia, or have a relationship with Pia anymore,” Solo said.

Solo said her immediate future is up in the air, joking that she’s “jobless.” Her husband, former NFL tight end Jerramy Stevens, is retired after playing his last football game in 2010 at age 30.

“Retirement suits you,” Stevens recently told Solo. But Solo isn’t accepting that.

“I’ve had a lot of offers to play overseas, so maybe Sweden will welcome me back,” Solo joked.

VIDEO: Solo’s immediate reaction to six-month suspension