Jacqueline Wiles

Lindsey Vonn finishes 13th in first race in 11 months

Leave a comment

ALTENMARKT-ZAUCHENSEE, Austria (AP) — Christine Scheyer of Austria upset the prerace favorites to win a women’s World Cup downhill Sunday, while Lindsey Vonn placed 13th in her first race in nearly 11 months.

Not being able to push out of the start gate as usual, the American was more than half a second off the lead at the first split and finished 1.54 behind the Austrian.

“I have a little start routine with my poles and I couldn’t really do that with my right hand,” Vonn said. “I also kind of lost grip on my pole after the last jump.”

RACE REPLAY | RESULTS

The four-time overall champion, who holds the women’s record of 76 victories, was out nursing a knee injury and a broken arm since February last year.

The fracture in her right upper arm also damaged nerves, which was still limiting mobility of her hand.

After announcing a few days ago that she had come to win, Vonn still saw the positives of her comeback race after 322 days.

“All things considered it’s about what I would expect,” she said. “I felt like I was skiing pretty well, just maybe not quite on the limit yet.”

Vonn had three weeks left, including speed weekends in Germany and Italy, to find her best form for the world championships in St. Moritz, Switzerland.

“That’s definitely a huge goal of mine,” she said. “For now I am happy. It’s not really a matter of results. It’s a matter of just being happy to be racing again. Of course I had higher expectations of myself but considering the conditions and the fact that we had a training run and the race today, I think it was pretty good.”

Scheyer, whose previous best was ninth in last month’s downhill in Val d’Isere, became the unusual winner of an unusual race.

After heavy snowfall had canceled the program for the past three days, the mandatory training session had to be held just hours before the race.

Scheyer impressed in training as she posted the second fastest time, but went one spot better in the race.

In only her fourth World Cup downhill start, she beat Tina Weirather of Liechtenstein by 0.39 seconds. Jacqueline Wiles of the United States was 0.54 behind in third for her first career podium.

Defending overall champion Lara Gut of Switzerland finished fourth, while Ilka Stuhec of Slovenia, who had won all three previous downhill races this season, came fifth.

“It’s hard to describe,” said Scheyer, who started in speed racing this season after recovering from two severe knee injuries. “I just wanted to have a good training run. After that, I was hoping for a top-10 finish.”

In her training run, Vonn held back and got out of her tuck well before finishing 2.71 seconds off the fastest time, posted by Ester Ledecka of the Czech Republic.

“It was definitely getting a lot faster from the training run to the race,” Vonn said. “I had a hard time pushing the limit with the flat lights and the bumps.”

While the podium remained far out of reach for Vonn, teammate Wiles stepped in to grab her second career top-10 result.

A late starter with bib No. 26, Wiles beat Gut by 0.01 to bump the Swiss overall champion, who was sitting in third, off the podium.

“I try to always have confidence in myself,” Wiles said. “For me to be able to come out today and have a successful run the way I did, is pretty awesome.”

Wiles’ win also felt like a victory for Vonn, whose foundation starting financially supporting Wiles this season.

“I am very happy for Jackie,” said Vonn. “This is an incredible result for her. I am super happy.”

In training, Nadia Fanchini of Italy and Edit Miklos of Hungary crashed and were airlifted to hospital. Austria team doctor Anton Wicker said Fanchini broke her right upper arm and had a fracture of the spinous process, while Miklos suffered a right-knee injury.

MORE: Bode Miller plans to race next season, U.S. coach says

U.S. ski racers produce nude calendar to raise money

Getty Images
Leave a comment

VAL D’ISERE, France (AP) — A group of American skiers are taking it all off in an effort to raise some money.

Five female and six male ski racers have joined together to pose in a nude calendar they hope will help them overcome high costs — and scarce funding — on the professional ski tour.

Called “Under the Suit: The Bodies of the Ski Team,” the calendar features the skiers in naked action shots: Either on the slopes or mountain biking in Chile and New Zealand, or pumping iron at their local gym in Park City, Utah.

Skiers below “A” team level pay their own travel costs, ranging from $15,000 to $35,000 each season. The original idea for calendar came from Brennan Rubie, who is racing at “C” team level.

“It’s tough for us because we have to raise a bunch of cash,” the 25-year-old Rubie told The Associated Press. “We’ve all reached out to our parents, our parents’ friends.”

Athletes should get up to $4,000 each from sales, which Rubie says is “a big chunk of money that can really take some stress off.”

Jacqueline Wiles, a member of the “B” team who is also unfunded, features on the calendar taking off into the air — naked except for a ski helmet, gloves and boots. Teammates Breezy Johnson and Alice McKennis are also in the calendar.

“I think the target is raising around $110,000,” Wiles told the AP recently at the French resort of Val d’Isere. “They want to get all the calendars out before Christmas … to be a stocking stuffer.”

Even though they are funded, two-time Olympic champion Ted Ligety and Olympic super-G silver medalist Andrew Weibrecht have helped out.

“It’s cool to see everyone come together,” Weibrecht said.

Wiles and McKennis are a long way from enjoying the success of four-time overall World Cup winner Lindsey Vonn and Olympic slalom champion Mikaela Shiffrin — who have won 99 World Cup races between them.

The 27-year-old McKennis won a downhill in the Austrian resort of St. Anton in January 2013 — her only podium — and Wiles has one top-10 finish.

Many are struggling behind them.

“Athletes are being more and more unfunded, having to find our own means. So this summer we tried to be creative,” Wiles said. “The men’s team did a bunch (of photos) in Norway. We did some in Chile, New Zealand — and in the gym in Park City.”

Aside from raising money, Wiles said the photos showcase athlete’s bodies in a “tasteful and strong” way. She has received positive feedback from mothers with concerns over anorexia, fearful that their daughters feel pressured to follow very slim role models.

“I think everyone really likes the idea of displaying our bodies in a very athletic, powerful position,” Wiles said. “We work hard to be physically fit for our sport, and I think it’s really cool to show our fans and family what our bodies go through.”

One of the most sensitive issues when doing the photos was passers-by.

“In New Zealand, we did it at a ski resort and there were other people hiking a different ridge. They could see me,” McKennis said. “When Jacqui (Wiles) and I went off the downhill jump in Portillo (Chile), there were definitely a few creepy spectators. One of our coaches, helping drive us in a snowmobile, actually stopped and yelled at them.”

While not opposing the calendar, the U.S. ski federation has been “very hands off with the whole project,” McKennis said.

“Just because it is something that they saw as something risky, that athletes are showing their naked bodies to the public,” McKennis said. “They were just like ‘We don’t want to be involved. If you’re going to do this, you need to do it separately.'”

Putting the calendar together ate into what little spare time the competitive skiers have.

“We’re racing, we’re training. It’s hard to be as proactive as we want to be with it,” McKennis said. “Evenings, whenever we can, we just try and fit it in. It can be really challenging.”

MORE: Ted Ligety’s struggles compounded by another injury