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Jessie Diggins, inspired by Body Issue, shares eating disorder battle

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Jessie Diggins hopes to open a conversation about body image after appearing in ESPN the Magazine‘s “Body Issue.” The Olympic gold medalist detailed her own experience with an eating disorder as a teenager in what she called “the most important blog I’ll ever write.”

“When I was 18-19 years old, I had everything in the world going for me, but I struggled with confidence and didn’t love myself,” Diggins, now 26, wrote on her website. “I suffered from an eating disorder, and eventually sought help at a treatment center, checking in for a summer program that saved my life. So when I was approached about the ESPN issue, I thought “is this REALLY something I want to do? Will it bring back old memories? Will I be ok with everyone seeing my body exactly as it is?”

Diggins is remembered for winning the first U.S. Olympic cross-country skiing title with Kikkan Randall in PyeongChang (Here comes Diggins!). In the cross-country world, she’s also reputed for her bubbly presence, spreading glitter across her face and sharing it with fellow skiers before races.

She wants to be associated with much more.

“I want to be known not for going through an eating disorder, but for helping other women and men speak up when they need help and not feel judged for needing a friend to talk it through with,” Diggins wrote. “Statistically speaking, at least 6% of you reading this right now are struggling with disordered eating in some way. So to those of you for whom it feels like the end of the world, I can say this: it can, and it does, get better. I know, because I lived it. It will take more courage than most anything else in your life, but you can get better. And it’s worth it.”

Years before becoming a medal-winning athlete, Diggins checked into The Emily Program, a national leader for eating disorder treatment.

“It was the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life, but also the most important,” she wrote. “Because it saved my life, in every way that a life can be saved. I learned that I was struggling with this so much because I needed an outlet for stress, and that it was ok to feel a range of emotions – that I could survive feeling pressured, stressed, unhappy, sad, or angry as well as feeling happy-go-lucky.”

Diggins called posing for the Body Issue “a full-circle moment.” ESPN says the Body Issue celebrates every shape and size of athletes in artful fashion.

“[It’s] a chance for me to use a large stage to waltz right up to the microphone and share a message that I think is extremely important, and long overdue,” Diggins wrote. “We need to open up the conversation about body image, self confidence, and disordered eating. It should not be a shameful thing, or a taboo topic. It’s more prevalent than people think, and perhaps making help easier to find and less difficult to ask for could save some lives.”

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Adam Rippon leads Olympians in ESPN the Magazine Body Issue

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Figure skater Adam Rippon is among seven Olympians announced for the 10th edition of ESPN the Magazine‘s Body Issue.

Rippon, a team event bronze medalist, is joined by fellow PyeongChang Olympian Jessie Diggins (gold, cross-country skiing) and Summer Olympians Tori Bowie (track and field), Sue Bird and Breanna Stewart (basketball) and Megan Rapinoe and Crystal Dunn (Soccer),

Non-Olympian athletes include Saquon Barkley and Jerry Rice (football), Zlatan Ibrahimovic (soccer), Greg Norman (golf), Karl-Anthony Towns (basketball), Dallas Keuchel and Yasiel Puig (baseball), Lauren Chamberlain (softball) and Charlotte Flair (WWE).

Images will be published online Monday, and the magazine hits newsstands June 29, according to ESPN.

Past Olympians in the Body Issue include Serena Williams (on the first cover in 2009), Michael PhelpsKerri Walsh JenningsAly Raisman and Gus Kenworthy,

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MORE: Adam Rippon opines on figure skating future

‘Here Comes Diggins!’ now an ice cream flavor

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Selma’s Ice Cream Parlour in Olympic cross-country skiing gold medalist Jessie Diggins‘ hometown of Afton, Minn., unveiled a new flavor on Jessie Diggins Day on Saturday.

There could only be one name for the reported mix of strawberry, vanilla and blueberry (red, white and blue).

“From the moment we crossed the finish line, it was here comes Diggins, so that’s the name of the ice cream,” Diggins said on stage, referencing NBC Olympics’ Chad Salmela‘s memorable call from PyeongChang.

Local residents and Diggins fans gathered from noon to 5 p.m. in Town Square Park of the small city outside St. Paul to greet Diggins and see her gold medal, according to the St. Paul Pioneer Presswhich reported that a short section of St. Croix Trail in downtown Afton would also be named after the Olympic champ.

“This might be the first gold medal we’ve ever had,” Diggins said, “but I know it will not be the last.”

Diggins, 26, and 35-year-old Kikkan Randall earned the U.S.’ first Olympic cross-country skiing gold medal by edging powerhouse Sweden in the team sprint in PyeongChang.

Diggins honed her skills at Afton Alps, a large ski and snowboard area in Afton. She worked as a stock girl at nearby Slumberland Furniture, a company that went on to sponsor her skiing career.

In 2015, Diggins received golden “Skis to the City” at Afton’s annual Fourth of July parade, where she served as the Grand Marshal.

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MORE: Best cross-country skiing moments from PyeongChang Olympics