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Adam Rippon leads Olympians in ESPN the Magazine Body Issue

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Figure skater Adam Rippon is among seven Olympians announced for the 10th edition of ESPN the Magazine‘s Body Issue.

Rippon, a team event bronze medalist, is joined by fellow PyeongChang Olympian Jessie Diggins (gold, cross-country skiing) and Summer Olympians Tori Bowie (track and field), Sue Bird and Breanna Stewart (basketball) and Megan Rapinoe and Crystal Dunn (Soccer),

Non-Olympian athletes include Saquon Barkley and Jerry Rice (football), Zlatan Ibrahimovic (soccer), Greg Norman (golf), Karl-Anthony Towns (basketball), Dallas Keuchel and Yasiel Puig (baseball), Lauren Chamberlain (softball) and Charlotte Flair (WWE).

Images will be published online Monday, and the magazine hits newsstands June 29, according to ESPN.

Past Olympians in the Body Issue include Serena Williams (on the first cover in 2009), Michael PhelpsKerri Walsh JenningsAly Raisman and Gus Kenworthy,

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MORE: Adam Rippon opines on figure skating future

United States women held by Colombia, still win Group G

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Having never lost a major international match to Colombia the United States women, already well-positioned to win Group G, were expected to comfortably pick up a third win in as many matches. But things didn’t go as planned, with the South American side putting forth a tougher challenge than expected. Catalina Usme’s left-footer free kick in the 90th minute pulled Colombia level, with the match finishing in a 2-2 draw in Manaus.

Yet even with the surprising result the United States won Group G, finishing on seven points with France, 3-0 winners over New Zealand, finishing second on six points. Next up for the Americans is a quarterfinal match in Brasilia Friday against Sweden, which finished third in Group E.

MORE: Hope Solo: “We got our point”

Colombia opened their account in the 26th minute on an Usme free kick that was poorly handled by keeper Hope Solo. Usme’s shot dipped, slipping through Solo’s hands and going into the net. Solo, who picked up her 200th international cap in the win over France, did not have her best night in goal for the United States. However the Americans would even the score in the 42nd minute as Crystal Dunn cleaned up a rebound from a Carli Lloyd shot that caromed off the crossbar.

The United States appeared to be in control of the match early in the second half, culminating in Mallory Pugh’s goal in the 60th minute to make the score 2-1. With her goal Pugh, just 18 years old, became the youngest American goal scorer in Olympic history. But the Colombians continued to attack, ultimately earning the free kick opportunity for Usme in the final minute of regulation time.

WATCH: Catalina Usme’s match-tying free kick

Also of note for the United States was the tournament debut of midfielder Megan Rapinoe. Rapinoe, who tore the ACL in her right knee in early December, played 32 minutes before being replaced by Pugh in the 33rd minute.

The other quarterfinal match-ups are Brazil vs. Australia, Canada vs. France and Germany vs. China.

U.S. women’s soccer stars discuss wage-discrimination complaint

U.S. women's soccer
TODAY
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Five star U.S. women’s soccer players are filing a wage-discrimination complaint against U.S. Soccer with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission seeking equal pay with their male counterparts.

U.S. Olympic champions Carli LloydHope SoloAlex Morgan and Becky Sauerbrunn appeared on TODAY to discuss the move Thursday morning (video here). Megan Rapinoe was also involved in the complaint.

U.S. women are paid between $3,600 and $4,950 per game, while men receive $6,250 to $17,625. Women receive 44 percent of what their male counterparts earn for making the World Cup team, according to TODAY, citing the complaint.

“We’ve proven our worth over the years,” said Lloyd, whose hat trick propelled the U.S. to victory in the 2015 Women’s World Cup Final. “The pay disparity between men and women is just too large. We want to continue to fight. The generation of players before us fought, and now it’s our job to keep on fighting.”

Solo said “not much has changed” with regards to equal-pay issues in the decade-plus she’s been on the national team.

“We’ve continued to be told we should be grateful just to have an opportunity to play professional soccer,” Solo said. “It’s about equality. It’s about equal rights. It’s about equal pay.”

Their attorney, Jeffrey Kessler, said that players were told “it was irrational” when they asked for the same treatment as men’s players.

Morgan was asked by Matt Lauer if players would boycott games or strike.

“I think that’s why we’re here taking this action and filing this complaint,” Morgan responded ahead of the Rio Olympics, which begin Aug. 3 for women’s soccer. “Every single day we sacrifice just as much as the men. We work just as much. We endure just as much physically and emotionally. Our fans really do appreciate us every day for that. We saw that with the high last summer. We’re asking and demanding now that our federation, our employer really, step up and appreciate us as well.”

On TODAY, the players laughed when asked if they had heard from male players.

“I’m sure they are in support of us,” said Morgan, whose husband, Servando Carrasco, plays in MLS.

Kessler said that in 2015 the U.S. women’s national team made over $16 million for U.S. Soccer, while the men’s team caused a $2 million loss. Last year was a World Cup year for the women, but not for the men.

“We are disappointed about this action,” U.S. Soccer said in a statement. “We have been a world leader in women’s soccer and are proud of the commitment we have made to building the women’s game in the United States over the past 30 years.”

MORE: Carli Lloyd ranks Olympic final-winning goals, World Cup hat trick