Regan Smith

Katie Ledecky swims fastest at U.S. Open from B final

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For what must have been the first time in seven years, Katie Ledecky failed to qualify for an A final in one of her primary events on Friday morning. No matter, she swam the fastest 200m freestyle at the U.S. Open from the B final at night.

Ledecky, owner of 20 combined Olympic and world titles, clocked 1:56.24 to win the B final by nearly three seconds in Atlanta. In the very next race, American record holder Allison Schmitt touched first in the A final in 1:56.47.

Full results are here. The final day of the meet airs live on Saturday at 7 p.m. ET on NBCSN, NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app.

Ledecky has rarely lost domestically in freestyles from 200m through 1500m since she made her first Olympic team at age 15 in 2012.

She kept the streak intact, giving her a sweep of the 200m, 400m and 800m frees in the first three days of the U.S. Open, what could be the deepest domestic meet before the Olympic trials in June.

Internationally, Ledecky faced challengers in the 200m free in this Olympic cycle, unlike the last one. Italian veteran and world-record holder Federica Pellegrini won the last two world titles, with Ledecky missing the event this summer due to her mid-meet illness.

Ledecky ranks seventh in the world in the 200m free this year but likely would have been faster if she was able to race at her best at world champs.

Domestically, Simone Manuel has crept up, clocking 1:56.09 to lead off the 4x200m free relay at worlds to rank second among Americans in 2019. Manuel was the third-fastest American on Friday, recording 1:57.21, her fastest time ever outside of a major summer meet.

In other events Friday, Phoebe Bacon upset world-record holder Regan Smith in the 100m backstroke. Bacon, who like Smith is 17 years old, overtook Smith in the last 25 meters and prevailed by .05 in 58.63. Bacon, while shy of Smith’s world record 57.57, took .39 off her personal best to become the fifth-fastest in the world this year.

Olympic and world champion Lilly King dominated the 100m breaststroke, beating a strong field by .62 of a second in 1:05.65.

Chase Kalisz won a potential Olympic trials preview in the 400m individual medley in 4:13.07. Kalisz, the Rio silver medalist, held off 18-year-old Carson Foster by 1.69 seconds. Ryan Lochte, the 2012 Olympic champion in the event, was fifth, 6.65 seconds behind.

Rio Olympian Townley Haas won the men’s 200m free in 1:45.92, his fastest time since August 2018. Haas, the 2017 World silver medalist, improved to the second-fastest American in the event this year behind Andrew Seliskar.

Torri Huske won the 100m butterfly on the eve of her 17th birthday. Huske clocked 57.48, taking .23 off her personal best to move from sixth fastest to third fastest in the U.S. this year.

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Caeleb Dressel recalls summer tears in Golden Goggles speech

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Two weeks before the world championships, Caeleb Dressel was in tears after multiple practices going into the biggest meet of the year.

“Just because how bad I was doing,” Dressel said of his workouts. “I knew the pressure that was coming with it, what I expected of myself. So, it wasn’t an easy year, just the mental doubt I had coming into worlds.”

Four months later, Dressel stood at the podium of Sunday night’s Golden Goggles to receive two major awards — Male Race of the Year and Male Athlete of the Year, each for the second time.

Dressel earned a record eight medals at worlds in Gwangju, South Korea, including six golds and a world record in the 100m butterfly, taking Michael Phelps‘ mark off the books.

He reflected in his acceptance speech for Race of the Year for that 100m fly.

“If I can leave you with something, just don’t ever compare yourself to anyone,” Dressel said. “I’m not in this to beat one person in particular, which a lot of you can guess who I’ve been compared to. It’s not me. I don’t swim the same events. He’s a much better swimmer. I’m not in this to beat anybody’s medal count, records. I just want to see how far I can take this. I’m just a kid from Green Cove [Springs, Fla.] who has no business taking it as far as I have. I just want to see how far I can take it.”

Simone Manuel broke Katie Ledecky‘s six-year streak of winning Female Athlete of the Year. While Ledecky struggled at worlds with illness, her Stanford teammate Manuel earned seven medals, including four golds, and swept the 50m and 100m frees.

“When I first started in swimming, it was pretty difficult for me,” Manuel said. “It still is difficult to this day. But, often times, I didn’t feel like I fit in or it was the sport for me. Often times, people questioned why I was swimming because I’m not supposed to swim. And it’s really difficult. I never thought that I would see the day where I would stand up here and receive this award. What I’ve learned through this journey, even though it’s been very hard, is to follow your passion. Don’t let anyone tell you you can’t do anything.”

Regan Smith‘s incredible worlds performance — three world records in two races — was rewarded with Female Race of the Year (200m backstroke) and Breakout Performer of the Year.

“Before this summer, I was really just a little kid who had no idea what was going on in swimming,” said the 17-year-old from Minnesota. “I still am, but I feel like after this summer I really have a new perspective.”

Nathan Adrian, who came back from testicular cancer to be part of three relays at worlds, earned the Perseverance Award. He accepted while sporting a mustache for Movember.

“It’s a reminder to men out there, who actually on average live almost eight years less life than women, and one of the contributing factors to that is because they don’t see the doctor when they first notice something is wrong,” Adrian said. “To all you men out there, go see the doctor.”

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2019 U.S. swimming rankings (women)

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With many of the U.S.’ top swimmers taking a break after the world championships, and thus missing the national championships, the best way to survey the early favorites for June’s Olympic trials is to look at rankings by swimmers’ fastest times for 2019.

Last week’s world junior championships marked the last top international meet of the summer, making it a good time to take stock of the field in all of the individual Olympic events.

To no surprise, Katie Ledecky leads in her main events — the 200m, 400m, 800m and 1500m freestyles — despite missing events at worlds (and being slowed in those she did enter) due to illness. Her Stanford training partner, Simone Manuel, tops the 50m and 100m frees after sweeping those sprints at worlds.

Perhaps the most interesting note in the freestyle ranks is that Manuel is a close second to Ledecky in the 200m free. Manuel has never contested that event at an Olympics or worlds, but led off the 4x200m free relay at worlds in a personal-best time by .92.

MORE: U.S. men’s swim rankings

Regan Smith, the 17-year-old breakout swimmer of worlds, leads both backstrokes after breaking both world records. Kathleen Baker, the U.S. leader in the backstrokes and the 200m individual medley in 2018, ranks third and fourth in the backstrokes this year despite being slowed by pneumonia and a broken rib.

Lilly King, queen of the breaststrokes the last three years, tops her favored 100m breast and is second to resurgent veteran Annie Lazor in the 200m.

There is more parity in the butterfly and individual medleys, where Rio Olympians lead the 100m fly (Kelsi Dahlia), 200m fly (Hali Flickinger) and 200m IM (Melanie Margalis), but rising high school senior Emma Weyant tops the 400m IM. Retirements of Dana Vollmer (recent) and Maya DiRado (after Rio) helped open things up in those disciplines.

A newcomer to watch is Gretchen Walsh, a 16-year-old who swept the 50m and 100m frees at junior worlds.

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2019 U.S. Swimming Rankings — Women
50m Freestyle
1. Simone Manuel — 24.05
2. Abbey Weitzeil — 24.47
3. Erika Brown — 24.71
3. Gretchen Walsh — 24.71
5. Maxine Parker — 24.75

100m Freestyle
1. Simone Manuel — 52. 04
2. Mallory Comerford — 52.98
3. Abbey Weitzeil — 53.18
4. Gretchen Walsh — 53.74
5. Margo Geer — 54.09
6. Erika Brown — 54.13

200m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 1:55.78
2. Simone Manuel — 1:56.09
3. Katie McLaughlin — 1:56.48
4. Allison Schmitt — 1:56.97
5. Leah Smith — 1:57.40
6. Gabby DeLoof — 1:57.62

400m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 3:59.28
2. Leah Smith — 4:01.29
3. Kaersten Meitz — 4:05.80
4. Melanie Margalis — 4:06.35
5. Ally McHugh — 4:07.08

800m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 8:10.70
2. Leah Smith — 8:16.33
3. Ashley Twichell — 8:25.43
4. Ally McHugh — 8:26.04
5. Erica Sullivan — 8:26.13

1500m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 15:45.59
2. Ashley Twichell — 15:54.19
3. Erica Sullivan — 15:55.25
4. Ally McHugh — 16:05.98
5. Kensey McMahon — 16:09.80

100m Backstroke
1. Regan Smith — 57.57
2. Olivia Smoliga — 58.73
3. Phoebe Bacon — 59.02
4. Kathleen Baker — 59.03
5. Katharine Berkoff — 59.29

200m Backstroke
1. Regan Smith — 2:03.35
2. Lisa Bratton — 2:07.91
3. Kathleen Baker — 2:08.08
4. Alex Walsh — 2:08.30
5. Hali Flickinger — 2:08.36

100m Breaststroke
1. Lilly King — 1:04.93
2. Annie Lazor — 1:06.03
3. Breeja Larson — 1:06.78
4. Kaitlyn Dobler — 1:06.97
5. Bethany Galat — 1:07.13

200m Breaststroke
1. Annie Lazor — 2:20.77
2. Lilly King — 2:21.39
3. Bethany Galat — 2:21.84
4. Emily Escobedo — 2:22.87
5. Madisyn Cox — 2:23.84

100m Butterfly
1. Kelsi Dahlia — 57.06
2. Katie McLaughlin — 57.23
3. Amanda Kendall — 57.51
3. Kendyl Stewart — 57.51
5. Aly Tetzloff — 57.70

200m Butterfly
1. Hali Flickinger — 2:05.96
2. Katie Drabot — 2:06.59
3. Regan Smith — 2:07.26
4. Lillie Nordmann — 2:07.43
5. Dakota Luther — 2:07.76

200m Individual Medley
1. Melanie Margalis — 2:08.91
2. Madisyn Cox — 2:10.00
3. Kathleen Baker — 2:10.65
4. Ella Eastin — 2:10.72
5. Alex Walsh — 2:11.24

400m Individual Medley
1. Emma Weyant — 4:35.47
2. Brooke Forde — 4:36.06
3. Ella Eastin — 4:37.18
4. Madisyn Cox — 4:37.23
5. Makayla Sargent — 4:37.95