yulia efimova

Yulia Efimova
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Yulia Efimova’s swimming at home a hit on social media

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Russia swimmer Yulia Efimova may be best known for her rivalry with American Lilly King at the Rio Olympics. But now, Efimova is being seen again for her swimming outside of the pool.

On April 9, the breaststroker posted video of a unique at-home quarantine workout — doing swimming strokes while hanging over a kitchen counter. It’s been viewed nearly 200,000 times on her Instagram and countless more times on other social media outlets.

Efimova, 28, found herself in a public feud with King at the Rio Olympics.

Efimova was initially barred from the Games under an IOC mandate that any Russian who previously served a doping ban would be ineligible due to the country’s anti-doping violations at that time.

She appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), which ruled that IOC stipulation unenforceable.

King memorably finger-wagged at an image of Efimova on a TV in the ready room and beat the Russian in the 100m breaststroke the next night.

“You’ve been caught for drug cheating, I’m just not a fan,” King memorably said in Rio, adding after the Games, “[Doping] was on all of our minds. We had team meetings talking about what it was going to be like. We were going to be racing dopers, and we all knew it.”

King and Efimova, while dueling at the last two world championships, have actually embraced.

“I wouldn’t say we have completely moved on, but we are definitely more cordial than we have been,” King said at 2019 Worlds in South Korea. “Again, that was three years ago. I was 19 and a half. … I think it was blown out of proportion a little bit, the whole situation, but again we’ve both grown up since then. We’ve both moved on, and I think we take this rivalry in stride.”

Efimova’s eligibility for the Tokyo Games is in question. In December, Russia was banned from the Olympics and four years of world championships in Olympic sports due to more recent anti-doping violations. Its athletes can still compete as neutrals, if meeting specific anti-doping criteria, similar to how they did at the PyeongChang Winter Games.

It was unclear from that ruling whether Efimova, who is not known to have violated any doping rules since Rio, will be allowed to compete as a neutral, should Russia accept the sanctions or any appeal to CAS by the nation be denied.

“I will behave in a similar way,” to 2016, Efimova said in December, according to RT.com. “I have already hired a lawyer. There is a rule that a person can’t be punished twice for the same offense. If you violate a driving code or instigated a brawl you will not be punished twice for that. I hope it will work, but I cannot be sure of [a positive outcome].

“Right after my race at the Rio Games, I said that this doping controversy was not over, it was just the beginning, and we would have problems in the future. It was quite clear. And with every new year the situation is only getting worse and worse.”

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Yulia Efimova has lawyer ready if Russia ban affects her

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Yulia Efimova, the Russian swimmer who earned two Rio Olympic silver medals after initially being excluded from the Games for serving a prior doping ban, is bracing for another legal fight after the latest sanctions against her nation.

On Monday, Russia was banned from the 2020 and 2022 Olympics and the next four years of world championships in Olympic sports due to more recent anti-doping violations. However, its athletes can still compete as neutrals, if meeting specific anti-doping criteria, similar to how they did at the PyeongChang Winter Games.

Efimova was initially barred from the Rio Olympics under an IOC mandate that any Russian who previously served a doping ban would be ineligible due to the country’s anti-doping violations at that time.

Efimova appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), which ruled that IOC stipulation unenforceable. She went on to earn 100m and 200m breaststroke silver medals and develop a rivalry with American Lilly King, who said Efimova should not have been eligible.

It’s unclear from Monday’s ruling whether Efimova will be allowed to compete as a neutral, should Russia accept the sanctions or any appeal to CAS by the nation be denied.

“I will behave in a similar way,” to 2016, Efimova said, according to RT.com. “I have already hired a lawyer. There is a rule that a person can’t be punished twice for the same offense. If you violate a driving code or instigated a brawl you will not be punished twice for that. I hope it will work, but I cannot be sure of [a positive outcome].

“Right after my race at the Rio Games, I said that this doping controversy was not over, it was just the beginning, and we would have problems in the future. It was quite clear. And with every new year the situation is only getting worse and worse.”

Efimova, 27 and the two-time reigning world 200m breast champion, was banned 16 months between 2013 and 2015 after testing positive for a steroid. A FINA panel ruled that Efimova was not intentionally trying to cheat but was negligent in failing to read the label of a GNC store supplement.

“Yes, long ago I made a doping violation,” Efimova said this week, according to RT. “But there are a great number of U.S. and European athletes who have a similar situation regarding doping, and they are competing without any restrictions. If you want to introduce those regulations, they must be equally applied to all athletes, not only Russian competitors.”

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Simone Manuel wins gold in 100-meter freestyle

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Defending world and Olympic champion Simone Manuel pulled off a rare feat Friday at the World Swimming Championships, winning another 100-meter freestyle title from all the way out in Lane 1, setting a new American record time of 52.04 seconds.

The U.S. team took three medals in the evening session, with Ryan Murphy taking silver in the 200m backstroke and the men taking bronze in a back-and-forth 4x200m freestyle relay. American swimmers also took two world records, with Caeleb Dressel and Regan Smith smashing the long-standing marks in their semifinals.

READ: Dressel, Smith set world records in Friday semifinals

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Manuel hadn’t looked as strong this week as Cate Campbell, who raced past Manuel to lead Australia to victory in the 4×100-meter mixed medley relay. Campbell started in the middle of the pool alongside world record-holder Sarah Sjoestroem of Sweden, while a slow semifinal put Manuel in the unfamiliar position of the outside lanes.

But Manuel started well and led at the turn, then touched the wall 0.39 seconds ahead of Campbell, who looked up in disbelief. Sjoestroem took her second freestyle bronze of the championships to go with her silver in the 100-meter butterfly. American Mallory Comerford finished seventh.

“I did feel a lot of pressure coming into the meet,” Manuel said. “I think a lot of it was on myself, wanting to repeat.”

Murphy followed up with a silver medal in the 200-meter backstroke behind Evgeny Rylov, getting within a few inches of the Russian swimmer after the final turn but fading just enough at the end to lose by half a body length. Rylov finished in 1:53.40 to Murphy’s 1:54.12, the two fastest times in the world this year.

“I judge my success off the Olympics,” Murphy said when asked if he was disappointed at the lack of an individual world championship.

Australia won a wild men’s 4×200-meter freestyle relay full of lead changes, with Russia taking second and the U.S. rallying twice to take bronze.

The U.S. was in fifth after Andrew Seliskar‘s opening leg. Blake Pieroni, swimming the second leg, briefly gave the U.S. team the lead and finished his swim with the team in second. The U.S. faded again to fifth in Zach Apple‘s third leg, but Townley Haas, a veteran of several medal-winning relays in 2016 and 2017, forged ahead to challenge for the lead and finally finish with bronze ahead of Italy and defending champion Great Britain.

Russia took a third win of the session and the third world record of the session, after Dressel and Smith, when Anton Chupkov rallied past Australia’s Matthew Wilson to win the 200-meter breaststroke in 2:06.12.

Chupkov was in last place at the halfway mark, 1.58 seconds behind Wilson, who had tied the world record of 2:06.67 in the semifinals. Chupkov was still only fifth at the final turn but stormed past Wilson, who finished just a hair off his previous record with a time of 2:06.68.

American Andrew Wilson was second at the halfway mark and third at the final turn but faded to sixth.

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