rubinroit

USAT/AVP

Chase Budinger, former NBA player, shoots for Olympic beach volleyball

Leave a comment

NEW YORK — LeBron James. Dwight Howard. Kevin Durant. Harrison Barnes.

Just four athletes have been named MVP of the McDonald’s High School All-American boys’ basketball game and won an Olympic gold medal this century.

Chase Budinger aspires to be the fifth, despite having not played in the NBA since 2016.

“I’m a professional beach volleyball player now,” Budinger, a seven-season NBA veteran, said at the AVP New York City Open last week. “I’m still getting used to saying that.”

Budinger used his size — 6-foot-7 — and athleticism — he dunked over Diddy in the 2012 NBA Slam Dunk Contest — to transition to the sand.

Budinger is no stranger to the sport.

He played indoor volleyball in high school and was named the 2006 National Player of the Year by Volleyball Magazine.

For college, he decided among the University of Arizona, UCLA and USC. UCLA and USC offered the opportunity to play both basketball and volleyball, but coach Lute Olson sold him on basketball in Arizona.

“I decided to see how far basketball could take me,” said Budinger, whose older brother and sister both played college volleyball. “But in the back of my mind, I knew could always go back to volleyball after I was done with basketball.”

Budinger played beach volleyball every summer to keep his skills sharp and stay active in the offseason. He regularly partnered with fellow NBA players including Richard Jefferson, Kevin Love and Luke Walton.

About four years ago, Budinger moved to California’s South Bay, home to many of the nation’s top beach volleyball players, including two-time Olympian Sean Rosenthal. During pick-up games, Rosenthal often suggested that Budinger try beach volleyball when his basketball career ended.

“I thought partnering with Chase would be low risk with a very high reward,” said Rosenthal, who competed at the 2008 and 2012 Olympics with Jake Gibb, and has also played with 2008 Olympic champion Phil Dalhausser. “Chase reminds me of guys like that. He moves so well for a big guy.”

In January, Budinger agreed to practice with Rosenthal while his agent solicited professional basketball offers. After a couple of weeks, Budinger was hooked.

“I get to bike to work everyday and practice on the beach,” said Budinger, who has not touched a basketball in three months. “It’s a good life.”

The transition has not been easy.

Budinger and Rosenthal had a daunting draw in their first international tournament as partners in May. They lost to 2016 Olympic bronze medalists of Alexander Brouwer and Robert Meeuwsen of the Netherlands, and were eliminated by three-time Olympic medalist Ricardo Santos of Brazil.

They also went winless in their first domestic AVP tournament, as Budinger battled the flu while they played under the unforgiving Austin, Texas sun.

“We’ve had some bad luck,” Budinger said. “But it’s like any sport. I remember my first NBA game. I think I had two turnovers and an airball in my first couple of minutes. Then in the second half, I was able to calm down.”

Budinger’s goal is to compete for a medal at an Olympics, either in 2020 or 2024. He acknowledged that qualifying for the 2020 Tokyo Games “is a possibility, but a long shot.”

The U.S. can send a maximum of two teams to Tokyo. Dalhausser and Nick Lucena are third in the world ranking, but no other U.S. pair is in the top 20. The 2020 Olympic qualification period begins in earnest in September.

NBC Olympics analyst Dain Blanton agreed that 2020 Olympics is “possible” for Budinger but it “might be too soon.”

“The sky is the limit with Chase’s volleyball background and his competitive greatness as he has shown in the NBA,” said Blanton, a 2000 Olympic champion.  “He will be a force at the net as a blocker with his size and will also be a great attacker.”

Playing an outdoor sport is an adjustment for Budinger, whose high school volleyball teammates nicknamed him “Casper.”

“It’s been a lot of sunscreen and a lot of reapplying,” he said. “This is as tan as I’ve ever been.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

VIDEO: Beach volleyball on top of a Ferris wheel

Best Alpine skiing moments from the 2018 Winter Olympics

Getty Images
Leave a comment

From Lindsey Vonn’s final Olympic medal to a snowboarder winning an Alpine skiing race, check out the best moments from the 2018 Winter Olympics Alpine skiing competition.

Snowboarder Ester Ledecka wins shocking Alpine skiing gold medal

Everyone was surprised that Ester Ledecka won the Alpine skiing super-G gold medal.

Even Ledecka.

So when she saw her time, .01 seconds faster than defending Olympic champion Anna Veith, she could not believe her eyes.

“How did that happen?” Ledecka asked, shaking her head.

Mikaela Shiffrin wins Olympic gold, but misses podium in signature discipline

“I came into the Olympics as a multiple-medal threat, and I knew that, but I was also thinking on the plane ride over here that I could also literally walk away with nothing too, I could completely choke in every way possible,” Shiffrin said on “TODAY.” “So to be here sitting with you guys right now and having two medals is a relief but also just insane.”

Read the rest of the story and watch alpine skiing’s best moments by clicking here

Lindsey Vonn’s Olympic legacy

Lindsey Vonn
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The 2018 PyeongChang Winter Games is expected to be the final Olympics for Lindsey Vonn.

“I’m going to miss the Olympics and that’s one of the reasons why it was so emotional for me,” Vonn said. “I love racing, love being in the starting gate with so much pressure that you feel suffocated. Then you throw yourself down the mountain.”

A look at her Olympic legacy:

Three career Olympic medals

  • 2010 Vancouver Olympics (gold, downhill)
  • 2010 Vancouver Olympics (bronze, super-G)
  • 2018 PyeongChang Olympics (bronze, downhill)

Julia Mancuso is the only U.S. woman with more Olympic Alpine skiing medals.

U.S. Olympic downhill history

Vonn became the first U.S. woman to win an Olympic downhill gold medal in 2010.

Vonn, 33, became the oldest female Alpine skiing medalist in Olympic history when she claimed the downhill bronze medal in PyeongChang.

When Vonn was 10, she posed for a photo with her Olympic idol, Picabo Street.

Vonn still has the photo hanging in her bedroom.

“I want to give the girls of the next generation someone to look up to,” Vonn said, “just like I looked up to Picabo Street.”

Vonn thinks about that moment when she interacts with her own fans.

“I understand how much you can impact someone just by meeting them,” Vonn said. “A short period of time can make a lifelong difference.”