Akash Modi

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U.S. men’s gymnastics team named for world championships

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World medalists Sam Mikulak and Yul Moldauer headline the five-man U.S. gymnastics team for next month’s world championships in Stuttgart, Germany.

The roster, which also includes Akash ModiTrevor Howard and Shane Wiskus, was named after a selection camp. Mikulak automatically qualified via his combined scores from the U.S. Championships in August and the camp.

The other four gymnasts were chosen by a committee.

They will be tasked with ending the program’s longest global meet team medal drought of the millennium. The U.S. men last earned a world championships medal in 2014 (bronze). They were fifth at the last two Olympics despite placing first and second in qualifying. They were fourth at last year’s worlds behind powers China, Japan and Russia.

A look at the five men going to Stuttgart …

Sam Mikulak
Mikulak has been the top U.S. male gymnast since 2013, winning six U.S. all-around titles, the most in the last 50 years. He is the lone Olympian still competing these days and so valuable that, last year, he was tasked with performing on all six apparatuses in the world team final for the first time. Mikulak finally earned his first world medal last year (high bar bronze), but he yearns for more. A world all-around medal is not out of reach.

Yul Moldauer
The only other man on this team with a U.S. all-around title (from 2017, when Mikulak was injured) or a world medal (floor exercise bronze in 2017). The former NCAA all-around champion from Oklahoma is now embarking on his post-collegiate career, but injuries dogged him the last two summers. If Mikulak is the MVP of this program, Moldauer is its Scottie Pippen at the moment.

Akash Modi
The Rio Olympic alternate earned his place on the team by placing third in the all-around at nationals and second to Mikulak at last week’s selection camp. Modi, who debuted at worlds in 2018, can contribute across many events, which may boost his stock come next year when the teams for the Olympics are just four men.

Trevor Howard
Howard, at 26, is on the older end of gymnasts to make his first world team. He has been competing at the senior national level since 2011, but never better than fifth in the all-around. Why this year? Howard has established himself as a force on still rings, where the U.S. lost the most ground in the 2018 World team final.

Shane Wiskus
Wiskus, the youngest member of the team at 20, is the NCAA all-around silver medalist from Minnesota. He may be better known for this crazy high bar save at nationals. He may be needed on high bar, which in the last few years has gone from a strength to a concern for the U.S. Wiskus has the kind of difficulty to be an asset there, but can he execute at the biggest meet of his life?

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Sam Mikulak leads new-look U.S. men’s gymnastics team for worlds

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The U.S. men’s gymnastics program tapped a fresh-faced team to avoid its longest medal drought since the turn of the millennium. It didn’t have much else choice.

Two-time Olympian Sam Mikulak, coming off his fifth national all-around title, and 2017 U.S. champ Yul Moldauer headlined the roster named after a two-day selection competition Saturday.

Mikulak and Moldauer were all but locks after going one-two at nationals in August. A selection committee looked at results from nationals and last week’s meet, though Mikulak and Moldauer automatically made the team based on their scores.

None of the other three team members have competed at an Olympics or world championships. That’s Rio Olympic alternate Akash ModiAlec Yoder and Colin Van Wicklen.

The quintet is tasked with reaching high-performance director Brett McClure‘s team medal aspirations at the world championships in Doha that start in one month.

McClure, a 2004 Olympic team silver medalist, said before nationals that China, Japan and Russia are in a different league in terms of routine difficulty.

The U.S. men were fifth at the Rio Olympics and at the last worlds with a team event in 2015. That marked the first back-to-back global championships without a medal since 2006 and 2007.

The Americans last went three straight global championships missing the podium in 1997, 1999 and 2000.

In addition to the team, Mikulak, 25, yearns for an individual medal. He is at the moment one of the greatest U.S. gymnasts in history without an Olympic medal or an individual world championships medal in his collection.

Moldauer, the 22-year-old NCAA all-around champion from the University of Oklahoma, does own an individual medal. He earned floor exercise bronze at his worlds debut last year.

Modi, the Taco Bell and SpongeBob SquarePants-loving mechanical engineering master’s student at Stanford, was sixth in the all-around at nationals but improved to fourth at the selection camp competition.

McClure noted Modi’s ability to contribute on three of the six events — parallel bars, high bar and pommel horse. The U.S. is a bit weak on high bar, McClure said.

Yoder, 21, is known for his prowess on a past weak event — pommel horse. He won the national title on horse last month and was second to Mikulak at last week’s competition, beating 2017 World team member Marvin Kimble for a roster spot.

McClure praised Van Wicklen’s talent as the top vaulter at the selection camp meet. Moldauer’s former Oklahoma teammate was eighth in the all-around at nationals and fifth of the eight men at the selection meet.

The three men who missed the team were Kimble, Allan Bower (second and third in the U.S. all-around the last two years, but missed both world teams) and Trevor Howard.

All but one of Mikulak’s teammates from the last two Olympics have retired. The one who hasn’t — Rio pommel horse bronze medalist Alex Naddour — has been suspended since June for unspecified reasons.

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Sam Mikulak ‘the best loser’ on rough day at gymnastics nationals

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BOSTON — Sam Mikulak is in first place halfway through the U.S. Gymnastics Championships, but it feels like rock bottom.

“I can’t really do much worse than today,” he said. “The fact that I’m in first right now speaks that it really wasn’t too good of a day for anyone.”

Mikulak, a two-time Olympian, fell twice in six routines on the first of two nights of competition at TD Garden on Thursday. He’s in first largely because the other favorites struggled, too.

Mikulak still leads by 1.05 points over Akash Modi going into Saturday, when he can become the second man to win five U.S. all-around titles since 1970 (Blaine Wilson, 1996-2000).

Defending champion Yul Moldauer was sixth, gingerly shuffling off the floor with a back injury. Full scores are here.

“You don’t want to win on days like this,” said Mikulak, who came off high bar and pommel horse but said he wasn’t affected by a back injury that forced him to take last week very light in training. “I want to be able to slam routines and have it come down to the wire. That’s when it’s really exciting and intense, because everyone’s doing their best, and you want to beat people at their best. Not because you were the best loser.”

The only Olympian in the field hoped the first night would show where he stood among a new generation of gymnasts. After winning all four U.S. all-around titles in the last Olympic cycle, Mikulak only competed on two of six events at the 2017 Nationals following an Achilles tear.

Mikulak, who at 25 would be the oldest U.S. champion since David Durante in 2007, wasn’t pleased with much Thursday except his floor exercise. He finished the routine with a triple twist, the same element that caused his torn Achilles in February 2017, and motioned to pump up a crowd lacking energy.

Mikulak was supposed to vie with the 2017 champion Moldauer, a rising University of Oklahoma senior, for the all-around in Boston. But Moldauer trails by 2.4 points. He fell off the pommel horse, too, and sputtered to close out the night with major errors on parallel bars and high bar.

Moldauer said afterward that he was affected by a cracked disk plate in his back that has bothered him since the NCAA season in the spring. It hurt every time he bent forward.

“He’s experiencing a tremendous amount of tightness, and, despite some pretty heroic efforts, it clearly effected him tonight,” his coach, Mark Williams, tweeted. “We will reevaluate on Saturday.”

Moldauer said he discussed a little bit with Williams about not doing the all-around this week.

“But we weren’t going to let that [the back injury] just get in the way,” he said. “When you come to the championships, you need to do six events. You need to do all-around both days. You need to show what you have if you want to prove yourself to be on that team.”

The world championships team.

Gymnasts are competing not only for national titles this week but also to impress a selection committee for worlds.

In a change from recent years, the five-man roster for October’s worlds in Doha will not be named this weekend. Instead, eight men will be chosen for a September selection camp to determine the world team and three alternates. Results from nationals and the camp will be weighted equally, so there is still some pressure to perform well now.

Mikulak and Moldauer could mess up here and at the camp and still make that team. They are the most established American gymnasts.

Mikulak has been the best American over the last five years, though he has yet to earn an individual Olympic or world medal. Moldauer was the only U.S. men’s medalist at last year’s worlds (floor exercise bronze).

Nobody else stepped up in a big way Thursday. The U.S. men were fifth at the Rio Olympics and at the last worlds with a team event in 2015. That marked the first back-to-back global championships without a medal since 2006 and 2007.

“We don’t really want Team USA to look like it did today at the world stage,” said Modi, an Olympic alternate who didn’t fall Thursday but stumbled, hopped and had leg separation. “Not that everyone looked very bad, but it was not sharp. It wasn’t the crisp and polished gymnastics that we really want to be known for.”

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