Aleia Hobbs

Karsten Warholm
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Warholm, Duplantis continue record chases; Rome TV, stream schedule

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Karsten Warholm and Mondo Duplantis aren’t done record chasing this season.

Warholm, the world 400m hurdles champion from Norway, and Duplantis, the pole vault sensation from Sweden, continue pursuits of long-standing world records at a Diamond League meet in Rome on Thursday.

NBCSN coverage starts at 1 p.m. ET. NBC Sports Gold also streams live for subscribers.

Warholm takes his fifth crack this summer at the 28-year-old world record in the 400m hurdles, set at the Barcelona Olympics by American Kevin Young.

Since July 2019, the Norwegian clocked four of the 12 fastest times in history. That included his personal best at his last Diamond League appearance — 46.87 seconds to miss the record by .09 after clipping the last hurdle (just as Young did in 1992).

Warholm will either end his season in Rome or continue to the Norwegian Championships in Bergen on Sunday, his agent said.

Duplantis already broke the pole vault world record twice in February, raising it to 6.18 meters at indoor meets.

But he pursues the outdoor best as well, held by Ukrainian legend Sergey Bubka (6.14 from 1994). The 20-year-old raised in Louisiana has taken 13 unsuccessful attempts at 6.15 meters in the last 32 days.

Duplantis is expected to end his season in Doha next week.

Here are the Rome entry lists. Here’s the schedule of events (all times Eastern):

11:45 a.m. ET — Women’s High Jump
12:25 p.m. — Men’s Pole Vault
12:40 — Men’s High Jump
12:43 — Women’s 400m
12:53 — Women’s 400m Hurdles
1:03 — Men’s 400m Hurdles
1:13 — Men’s 400m
1:20 — Men’s 3000m
1:30 — Men’s Shot Put
1:38 — Women’s 100m Hurdles
1:47 — Men’s 110m Hurdles
1:55 — Women’s 800m
2:05 — Women’s 100m
2:15 — Men’s 100m

Here are three events to watch (statistics via Tilastopaja.org):

Men’s Pole Vault — 12:25 p.m.
Duplantis hasn’t faced much competition this season, but this field does include former world-record holder and 2012 Olympic champion Renaud Lavillenie of France. Duplantis’ routine has been to win the competition, then raise the bar to 6.15 meters for record attempts. Bubka is the only man to ever clear a higher height outdoors than Duplantis’ personal best of 6.07.

Men’s 400m Hurdles — 1:03 p.m.
Nobody else in the field has been within 1.4 seconds of Warholm’s personal best. He may not get a challenge from anybody else, but Warholm has been just fine running by himself this season, breaking the 300m hurdles world record in a solo race. He bounced back well from a 47.62 last week to clock 47.08 in Berlin on Sunday, putting him back on record watch in Rome.

Women’s 100m — 2:05 p.m.
No chance the world record falls here. But significant for the presence of Olympic champion Elaine Thompson, set to race outside Jamaica for the first time since the 2019 World Championships, where she was shockingly fourth in the 100m and withdrew from the 200m before the semifinals. Thompson ranks second in the world this year at 10.88 seconds, trailing countrywoman and fellow Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (who ran 10.86 but is not in the Rome field). Also in Rome: Ivorian Marie-Josée Ta Lou, a medalist at the last two world championships, and 2018 U.S. champion Aleia Hobbs.

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Noah Lyles, Michael Norman meet in Rome; preview, TV schedule

Noah Lyles, Michael Norman
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Noah Lyles puts undefeated streaks at stake in his first 200m of the season at a Diamond League meet in Rome, live on NBC Sports on Thursday.

Lyles, unbeaten in outdoor 200m races since the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials, takes on fellow 21-year-old phenom Michael Norman at Stadio Olimpico (11:05 a.m. ET, NBC Sports Gold, and 2 p.m. ET, NBCSN). Lyles is 3-0 all time against Norman, according to Tilastopaja.org.

The U.S. boasts its best young sprint talent in more than a decade among Christian Coleman (100m), Lyles (200m) and Norman (400m), all fastest in the world since the Rio Olympics in their respective signature events. Coleman is not racing in Rome, but headlines a Diamond League stop in Oslo next week.

It evokes memories of 15 years ago, when first-time Olympians Justin GatlinShawn Crawford and Jeremy Wariner swept the 100m, 200m and 400m at the Athens Olympics.

Lyles is the showman of this generation. He raps. He dances. He roars like a Dragon Ball Z character before races and then wins them wearing Speed Racer socks. He had the word “ICON” tattooed on his side at age 20, after a season in which injury kept him out of the U.S. and world championships.

When Lyles beat Coleman in a 100m for the first time in their senior careers two weeks ago, he said it was the beginning of his legacy as a 100m and 200m sprinter (though Lyles repeated this week that he will not attempt to double at worlds in September). A rivalry was born with Coleman, who (along with his girlfriend), vented on Twitter.

Lyles and Norman have a friendlier history, finishing fourth and fifth at the 2016 Olympic trials 200m. Lyles turned professional two weeks later, forgoing college. Norman turned pro after two seasons at USC and is now the sixth-fastest 400m runner in history. While Coleman indicated he plans to go for a 100m-200m double this year, Norman is expected to focus on the 400m at nationals and, should he qualify, worlds.

Here are the Rome entry lists. Here’s the schedule of events (all times Eastern):

11:05 a.m. — Women’s Javelin
12:30 p.m. — Men’s Shot Put
12:35 — Women’s Long Jump
1:15 — Women’s Pole Vault
2:03 — Men’s 400m Hurdles
2:13 — Women’s 400m Hurdles
2:15 — Men’s High Jump
2:23 — Men’s 800m
2:30 — Men’s Triple Jump
2:35 — Women’s 100m
2:45 — Men’s 5000m
3:05 — Women’s 400m
3:15 — Women’s 1500m
3:25 — Men’s 200m
3:35 — Men’s 110m Hurdles
3:45 — Men’s 3000m Steeplechase

Here are five events to watch:

Women’s Pole Vault — 1:15 p.m.
The four most decorated active women gather in 2012 Olympic champion Jenn Suhr, 2016 Olympic champion Katerina Stefanidi, Olympic and world silver medalist Sandi Morris and 2015 World champion Yarisley Silva. They’ll all be eyeing the 37-year-old Suhr’s world-leading clearance of 4.91 meters for 2019. Suhr’s last Diamond League win outside of the U.S. came in 2012.

Women’s 400m Hurdles — 2:13 p.m.
Every Olympic and world champion since 2013 is represented in this field among Kori Carter (2017 Worlds), Dalilah Muhammad (2016 Olympics) and Zuzana Hejnova (2013 and 2015 Worlds). Plus the second- and third-fastest women of 2018 — Shamier Little and Janieve Russell. The only missing superstar is Sydney McLaughlin, whose 52.75 was fastest in the world last year. Muhammad is fastest this season at 53.61.

Women’s 100m — 2:35 p.m.
The two phenoms of this event — U.S. champion Aleia Hobbs and European champion Dina Asher-Smith of Great Britain — go head-to-head for the first time. Hobbs won her Diamond League debut in Shanghai in 11.03 seconds, beating Olympic champion Elaine Thompson of Jamaica (who is also in the Rome field). Asher-Smith won the first two Diamond League 200m of this season in the world’s fastest times of the year. The winner here likely becomes world champs favorite.

Women’s 1500m — 3:15 p.m.
Olympic bronze medalist Jenny Simpson faces world-record holder Genzebe Dibaba for the first time since the 2017 Worlds. Simpson followed her surprise 2011 World title with national titles in 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017, but the 32-year-old last won a Diamond League race in 2015 and ceded the U.S. crown to Shelby Houlihan last year. This field lacks Olympic champion Faith Kipyegon (out since 2017 due to pregnancy) and Houlihan, but it does boast Brit Laura Muir.

Men’s 200m — 3:25 p.m.
It’s not just Lyles v. Norman. Also in the field: 2017 World gold and bronze medalists Ramil Guliyev and Jereem Richards. None of them have ever beaten Lyles, though. A time to note: 19.65 seconds. That’s Lyles’ personal best. Last year, Lyles joined Usain Bolt as the only men to break 19.7 four times in one season. But Lyles is still far from Bolt-at-his-best territory. He is the joint-eighth-fastest 200m man in history.

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Noah Lyles wins duel with Christian Coleman in Shanghai

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Noah Lyles won the first of what will hopefully be multiple head-to-heads with Christian Coleman this season, taking a 100m at a Diamond League meet in Shanghai on Saturday.

Both U.S. sprint phenoms clocked 9.86 seconds, with Lyles coming from about fifth place at 50 meters to edge Coleman by .006 with a lean.

“This was a message to myself,” Lyles said, according to the IAAF. “The 100 has never been my dominant thing so I wanted to make sure this year that everybody knew I was a 100 and 200 runner, and not just a 200 runner kind of running the 100.”

It’s a personal best for Lyles. Coleman has run 9.79.

Lyles, undefeated in outdoor 200m races since finishing fourth at the 2016 Olympic Trials at age 18, beat Coleman for the first time in three career senior 100m head-to-heads.

While Lyles prefers the 200m, Coleman has said he hopes to qualify for this fall’s world championships in both the 100m and 200m.

If Coleman follows through on that, he and Lyles will face off in the 200m at the USATF Outdoor Championships in July. Saturday marked Coleman’s first individual race since Aug. 31.

“It is always a struggle to get in good form after such a long time away from competition, so I didn’t have any specific expectations for today,” Coleman said. “In general I am fine with 9.86 today.”

Full Shanghai results are here. The Diamond League next visits Stockholm on May 30.

In other events, Qatar’s Abderrahman Samba won his anticipated duel with Rai Benjamin in a matchup between the second- and third-fastest 400m hurdlers in history. Samba, who took up the event full-time two years ago, clocked 47.27 seconds, which would have been the fastest time in a decade if not for Samba and Benjamin’s rapid times last June.

Benjamin, born in the Bronx and raised partly in Antigua and Barbuda, was passed before the last hurdle and crossed in 47.80. Last June, Benjamin won the NCAA title in 47.02, then matching Edwin Moses as second-fastest in history. Samba ran 46.98 later that month.

Kevin Young remains the longest-standing world-record holder in men’s track racing, setting 46.78 in the 1992 Olympic final.

Sydney McLaughlin, who in Rio became the youngest U.S. track and field athlete to compete at an Olympics in 44 years, was an impressive second in the 400m in her Diamond League debut. The 19-year-old pro, whose focus is the 400m hurdles, clung to world 400m silver medalist Salwa Eid Naser in the final straight and crossed in 50.78, just .13 back of Naser.

Naser hasn’t lost to anyone other than Olympic champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo since the 2017 Worlds. Miller-Uibo was absent from Shanghai.

U.S. champion Aleia Hobbs won her senior international 100m debut in 11.03 seconds, beating a field that included Olympic champ Elaine Thompson. Hobbs did so two weeks after fracturing a wrist playing laser tag. Thompson, who last won a Diamond League race in 2017, was third in 11.14.

Ethiopian Yomif Kejelcha won a battle among the three fastest active 5000m runners, bounding from Selemon Barega to win by .55 in 13:04.16. Barega won last year’s Diamond League Final in 12:43.02, the world’s fastest time in 13 years.

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