Allyson Felix

Allyson Felix joins IOC athletes’ commission

Allyson Felix
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Allyson Felix and a refugee cyclist originally from Afghanistan joined the International Olympic Committee’s athletes’ commission on Thursday.

Felix is the most decorated female track and field athlete in Olympic history with 11 medals, including seven golds, and joins the commission after winning her record-extending 14th career world championship title in her farewell meet.

Also appointed was cyclist Masomah Ali Zada, who was born in Afghanistan and competed in the women’s cycling time trial on the IOC’s refugee Olympic team last year in Tokyo. Ali Zada is now studying in France and will be the first refugee athlete on the commission.

The other two new members are two-time Olympic triathlon champion Alistair Brownlee of Great Britain and Canadian athlete Oluseyi Smith, who competed in the Summer Olympics in track and the Winter Olympics in bobsled.

The new members were all appointed to the IOC athletes’ commission, which has a mix of members elected by other athletes and those appointed directly by IOC President Thomas Bach. Only the elected members typically also serve on the full IOC, which decides Olympic host cities and will elect a new president to replace Bach in 2025.

“Athletes are at the very heart of the Olympic Movement, and it is therefore essential that their voices are heard within the IOC,” Bach said in a statement. “Those voices must be as diverse as possible. The appointment of these four new members of the athletes’ commission complements the outstanding skills and experience of the commission and ensures we have great representation across different sports and regions of the world.”

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Athing Mu wins 800m thriller, world records fall, U.S. wins most track worlds medals ever

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Athing Mu‘s victory by eight hundredths of a second in the 800m highlighted a three-gold-medal final day of the world track and field championships for the U.S., which broke the record for most total medals at a worlds.

Nigerian Tobi Amusan (100m hurdles) and Swede Mondo Duplantis (pole vault) also broke world records Sunday.

Mu and the U.S. men’s and women’s 4x400m relays won on the last day of the 10-day meet in Eugene, Oregon, the first outdoor worlds to be held in the U.S.

In all, the U.S. earned five medals on Sunday to finish with 33, breaking the record of 31 medals won by East Germany in 1987. Its 13 gold medals are one shy of the record that the U.S. holds from 2005, 2007 and 2019.

Notably, the retiring Allyson Felix earned a records-extending 20th career world championships medal and 14th gold for her participation in Saturday’s preliminary heats of the women’s 4x400m.

Sydney McLaughlin anchored the final quartet with a split of 47.91 seconds, making her the seventh-fastest relay performer in history and second-fastest in the last 33 years behind Felix. It could be a sign of things to come as McLaughlin, who smashed her world record in the 400m hurdles on Friday, may move full-time to the flat 400m.

Mu became the first American woman to win a world 800m title, a year after becoming the second American woman to win an Olympic 800m title. She barely held off surging Brit Keely Hodgkinson, the Olympic silver medalist, to her inside over the last 100 meters. Mu is undefeated in outdoor 800m races dating to 2019. On Her Turf has more on the women’s 800m here.

“Today was kind of a rough day for me,” said Mu, who in Tokyo won by a more comfortable .67 of a second. “I just physically wasn’t where I would like to be. I just didn’t feel my best.”

Mu, at 20, became the youngest woman to own Olympic and world titles in an individual track and field event in history. The only younger man to do it was Kirani James of Grenada in the 400m in 2011 and 2012.

TRACK WORLDS: Results

Also Sunday, Amusan ran the two fastest women’s 100m hurdles times in history, though only one counted for a world record. More on Amusan here. Duplantis capped the meet by breaking his own pole vault world record, clearing 6.21 meters (20 feet, 4 inches).

“I did not touch it [the bar], so that gives you confidence that you can go higher,” said Duplantis, one of only two men to pole vault higher than 20 feet outdoors (Sergey Bubka).

Norway’s Jakob Ingebrigtsen added a world 5000m title to his Olympic 1500m crown, taking the lead with 900 meters left and pulling away in the final 200. American Grant Fisher was in third coming around the last curve, stumbled — could have been clipped by another runner — and dropped to sixth.

Ingebrigtsen wants to run the 1500m and 5000m at the Olympics, but ran solely the 1500m in Tokyo because the events overlapped. The 2024 Olympic track and field schedule has not been published, though Ingebrigtsen said before worlds that he petitioned for the events to be separated and that it was rejected.

Kenya finished worlds without a gold medal in any of the men’s and women’s 5000m, 10,000m, marathons and 3000m steeplechases for the first time since the first worlds in 1983.

World record holder Kevin Mayer of France earned his second world title in the decathlon, a day after Olympic gold medalist Damian Warner of Canada pulled up with a leg injury in the 400m. Mayer earned silver medals at the last two Olympics and has a home Games in two years in Paris.

Zach Ziemek took bronze to become the first American medalist in the decathlon since Ashton Eaton retired after his second Olympic title in 2016.

German Malaika Mihambo followed her Olympic gold by repeating as world champion in the long jump, edging Olympic bronze medalist Ese Brume of Nigeria by 10 centimeters.

The track and field season continues with the resumption of the Diamond League circuit with a meet in Poland on Aug. 6, with early commits including Duplantis and world 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica.

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U.S. pulls off upset, gets upset in 4x100m relays at track worlds

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The U.S. women’s 4x100m pulled off the upset. The U.S. men’s 4x100m got upset.

The penultimate day of the world track and field championships produced surprises in the final two races on Saturday night’s program.

Melissa Jefferson, Abby Steiner, Jenna Prandini and TeeTee Terry stunned a Jamaican women’s quartet that included Shelly-Ann Fraser-PryceShericka Jackson and Elaine Thompson-Herah, who swept the individual 100m medals. The U.S. prevailed by four hundredths in 41.14 seconds.

Jefferson had the best split of the leadoff runners, then Steiner outsplit Thompson-Herah by .24, enough for Prandini and Terry to hold off Fraser-Pryce and Jackson’s charge.

“[If] there’s no chemistry, there’s no trust to be able to move the baton through the exchanges, then you aren’t really going to produce what you think you can produce just because you have the three or four fastest women,” Terry said. “Our chemistry was so good that we didn’t even really have to do much when we warmed up.”

Twenty minutes later, Christian Coleman, Noah Lyles, Elijah Hall and Marvin Bracy-Williams delivered silver rather than the expected gold. Canada, which won the men’s 4x100m at the last global championship held in the U.S. at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, edged the Americans by seven hundredths with Andre De Grasse anchoring.

The U.S. had subpar handoffs from Coleman to Lyles and even more so from Hall to Bracy-Williams on anchor.

The U.S. was without Fred Kerley, who won the individual 100m last Saturday as part of an American medals sweep, then suffered a quad injury in the 200m semifinals.

The U.S. is the greatest sprint nation in history, yet has swept the 4x100m golds at just one global championship (Olympics or worlds) in the last 29 years (22 meets). It is a testament that relays are not won purely by raw speed.

“A lot of people see that [silver] as a defeat, but to be honest with the struggles we’ve been having over the years, it’s just nice to get the stick around, run a fast time,” said Lyles, who was on the 2019 4x100m that earned the U.S. men’s lone gold since 2007.

Worlds finish Sunday with nine finals, including the women’s 800m (Athing Mu) and 100m hurdles (Keni Harrison), men’s pole vault (Mondo Duplantis) and decathlon finale and 4x400m relays.

TRACK WORLDS: Broadcast Schedule | Results | U.S. Roster | Key Events

Earlier Saturday, Allyson Felix made a surprise return to help the U.S. women’s 4x400m relay qualify for Sunday’s final. Felix, who thought last week’s mixed-gender 4x400m would be her last major race before retirement, was called in from Los Angeles (while eating hot wings and drinking a root beer float) to return to Eugene for the women’s 4x400m heats.

Felix, who was sixth at nationals in the individual 400m, had the fastest split of the four American women in the heat, but said she does not expect to be asked to be part of the final quartet. Expect 400m hurdles gold and bronze medalists Sydney McLaughlin and Dalilah Muhammad to be subbed in. Felix would still be in line for a record-extending 20th career world championships medal as prelim runners also receive medals.

Gudaf Tsegay gave Ethiopia a sweep of the women’s 5000m, 10,000m and marathon at worlds, taking the 5000m five days after earning silver in the 1500m and then being subbed into the nation’s 5000m lineup. She moved past Olympic gold medalist Sifan Hassan of the Netherlands coming around the final curve. Hassan faded to sixth, one spot behind world record holder Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia. On Her Turf has more on the women’s 5000m here.

Kenyan Emmanuel Korir followed his Tokyo Olympic gold with a world title in the 800m Korir overtook Canadian Marco Arop on the final straight. Algerian Djamel Sedjati also passed Arop for silver. No Americans made the final.

Like Korir, triple jumper Pedro Pablo Pichardo of Portugal added a world title to his Olympic gold. No Americans earned a medal in the event for the first time since 2009.

Grenada javelin thrower Anderson Peters, who got his start throwing rocks at mango trees as a kid, repeated as world champion.

Olympic decathlon champion Damian Warner of Canada pulled up with a left leg injury in the 400m, the fifth and final event of the first of two days of the competition. Warner was in the overall lead. Ayden Owens-Delerme of Puerto Rico, the NCAA champion from Michigan, took over the lead going into the last five events Sunday.

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