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Sofia Goggia, Olympic downhill champion, to miss chunk of World Cup season

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Olympic downhill champion Sofia Goggia is out until January after fracturing her right ankle in a training fall on Friday while preparing for next weekend’s World Cup season opener in Austria.

The Italian is not expected to have surgery, but the bone needs four to five weeks to heal.

The timetable means Goggia will miss the first six speed races of the World Cup season, denting a bid to repeat as World Cup downhill season champion. Goggia made five speed-race podiums at December stops in Lake Louise, Canada and Val d’Isere, France, between the last two seasons.

Her absence will increase Lindsey Vonn‘s chances to grab wins at Lake Louise (where she owns a record 18 victories), St. Moritz and Val d’Isere on back-to-back-to-back weekends in December. Vonn, who will retire after this season, is four wins shy of Swede Ingemar Stenmark‘s record 86 career World Cup victories.

When healthy, Vonn has averaged seven wins per season in recent years.

Vonn is not racing the World Cup season opener, a giant slalom in Soelden, which she has skipped four of the last five years.

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MORE: Vonn explains why it’s her final season

Lindsey Vonn: This will be my final season, record or not

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NEW YORK — Lindsey Vonn said Thursday that the 2018-19 season will definitely be her final one as a ski racer, even if she does not break Ingemar Stenmark‘s World Cup wins record.

Vonn has 82 victories, four shy of Stenmark’s record.

“If I get it [the record], that would be a dream come true,” Vonn said before a speaking event for Chase Ink in Manhattan. “If I don’t, I think I’ve had an incredibly successful career no matter what. I’m still the all-time winningest female skier.”

Vonn thought this spring and summer about continuing on to 2019-20 if she doesn’t reach the record this season. In the end, her lengthy injury history made the decision for her.

“Physically, I’ve gotten to the point where it doesn’t make sense,” Vonn said. “I really would like to be active when I’m older, so I have to look to the future and not just be so focused on what’s in front of me.”

Vonn repeated in PyeongChang that she planned to retire after the 2018-19 season, but at that time it was contingent on breaking the record.

“I’m not going to quit until I get that record, that is for sure, no matter how much pain I’m in,” Vonn said after her last Olympic race, “but I really hope it only takes one more season because it would be difficult for me to continue on after that.”

Olympic downhill champion Sofia Goggia hopes Vonn does not retire after next season. The Italian tried to persuade Vonn in PyeongChang.

“If I physically could continue for four years, then I probably would,” Vonn said she told Goggia in February. “But four years is a really long time. She said she’s going to keep trying to convince me, but we’ll see.”

When healthy (an important two words for Vonn), she has averaged about seven wins per season in recent years.

Vonn said she plans to race every downhill and super-G until she breaks the record, and probably through the end of the season in March, but no giant slaloms or slaloms.

Her first races are the first weekend of December at her favorite course, Lake Louise in Alberta, where a perfect weekend of three wins would draw her within one of Stenmark.

Vonn will leave the sport without achieving another goal — racing against men on the World Cup.

However, she said Thursday she could still do an exhibition event. Perhaps a head-to-head format.

In the spring, Vonn tabled her proposal to the International Ski Federation (FIS) to be allowed into a men’s race this fall but tweeted, “I haven’t given up on this. Just delaying it one more year.” FIS has denied her bid in the past.

Vonn hopes her next career is more successful than ski racing. Lofty goal.

She took a business class with other professional athletes at Harvard in May, noting then she had not attended college.

Chase, too, is helping her with the transition.

“I’m at an interesting point in my career where I want to pivot into business,” Vonn said, adding she wants to expand her Lindsey Vonn Foundation, which has aided young female ski racers. “It’s important to me to have people around me that know what they’re doing. I honestly don’t know the first thing about starting a business. I just know what I’m passionate about. I’m really passionate about beauty and outerwear.”

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VIDEO: Vonn, Gus Kenworthy battle on ‘Drop the Mic’

Bode, Morgan Miller hope daughter’s drowning raises awareness

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Bode and Morgan Miller spoke out about their 19-month-old daughter’s drowning to raise awareness for the leading cause of unintentional death for children 1 to 4 years old.

The Millers’ daughter, Emmy, died June 10, one day after paramedics tried unsuccessfully to revive her after the incident at a neighbor’s pool in California.

“It’s an obligation, to some degree,” Bode Miller said in a TODAY interview with Savannah Guthrie. “I think it does, in some way, help to heal, a little bit, that maybe we’re preventing it from happening to somebody else.”

Bode Miller is a six-time Olympic Alpine skiing medalist who covered the PyeongChang Winter Games for NBC. Morgan Miller is a former professional beach volleyball player. They wed in 2012.

“We have the choice to live our days with purpose to make sure that no other parent has to feel what we’re feeling,” Morgan Miller said.

On June 9, Morgan was with her kids at a neighbor’s house when she noticed she could not hear Emmy.

“All of a sudden it was just too quiet for me,” she said. “I stood up, and I turned, I walked right to where the boys were and I said, where’s Emmy? Before [son] Nate could respond, I turned around, and the door that leads to the backyard, that was closed, had this tiny sliver of light coming through the side. And my heart sank. I opened the door, and she was floating in the pool. I ran, and I jumped in.”

Morgan pulled Emmy out of the water and started CPR while a neighbor called 911. Bode was at a softball game and received a phone call, listening as paramedics continued trying to revive Emmy in an ambulance.

“In shock,” he said. Emmy died the following the day at an Orange County hospital.

“There’s not a day that goes by that I don’t pray for the opportunity to go back to that day and make it different, but now we have this opportunity to make other parents’ days different,” Morgan said. “I want to remember her as my baby girl. She brought so much to our lives, and now she’s helping us bring so much to everybody else’s lives.”