Amy Purdy

Amy Purdy
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Amy Purdy, Paralympic snowboarder, hospitalized for week

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Paralympic bronze medalist snowboarder Amy Purdy was released from a hospital after a week-long stay due to a serious muscle condition that can severely damage kidneys, according to her social media.

Purdy, a previous kidney transplant recipient from her father, was diagnosed with Rhabdomyolysis after noticing swelling in her arm following a preseason workout of pull-ups.

“Having a friend in the hospital with this condition last year, I rushed to the ER where they confirmed I had it too,” Purdy wrote. “I almost didn’t come to the hospital when I did because my symptoms were so mild, had I of decided to sleep it off l most likely would have had major kidney failure or even gone into shock by the next morning.”

Purdy wrote on Monday that she had been released from the hospital and would focus on healing.

“The recovery on this is supposed to take some time since the muscle fibers in both upper arms were damaged,” she wrote. “But all of this is minor compared to what it could have been!”

Purdy, 36, survived bacterial meningitis in 1999 but lost both her legs and later needed a kidney from her father at age 20.

Purdy is an innovator. She built her own snowboard and is seen as instrumental in getting her sport into the Paralympic program beginning in 2014.

A model, she has been in a Madonna music video, a Super Bowl commercial, ESPN the Magazine’s Body Issue and competed on “The Amazing Race” in 2012.

VIDEO: NBC Sports profile of Amy Purdy before Rio 2016

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Hey Friends! I'd like to fill you in on the last few days of my life. I am going on day 4 in the hospital after developing a very serious condition called Rhabdomyolysis. You should google it and read about it, its crazy. It basically can occur when you overwork a muscle group and the muscle begins to breakdown into your blood stream. It can severely damage kidneys pretty quickly and as most of you know I have a kidney transplant which was a big concern. I have been training as I prepare for the snowboard season and 1 day last week I pushed myself too hard. It seemed to happen so innocently, I did a series of Pull-ups and simply pushed too hard to complete the set. My muscles were a bit sore for a day, nothing bad but then I noticed a bit of swelling in my arm and having a friend in the hospital with this condition last year, I rushed to the ER where they confirmed I had it too. It's been a very intense week hooked up to machines supporting my kidney through this process. It's so crazy to be so healthy and to think you are doing good for your body, then to suddenly have a life threatening condition occur. As scary and serious as this has been, I have been very blessed that my Kidney has stayed strong. I'm also lucky I came in when I did, had I of waited a few more hours before going to the ER my situation could have easily been critical. That being said, my numbers are moving in the right direction, it's just going to take some time to recover. I wanted to share this with all of you because for 1, I believe social media should give insight into our lives, and life doesn't always have a pretty filter. Also, I want to inform you about this disorder that can happen to anyone. You have to listen to your body.. when it is telling you to stop.. Stop! My Dr said "we all have a breaking point, and you found yours " . I will share regular updates through my recovery. Thanks for the love and support friends. :)❤️️🙏✨

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Thank you for all your prayers and kind messages! I didn't think I could be more grateful to be alive then I already was but here I am beyond grateful for my life and health. I almost didn't come to the hospital when I did because my symptoms were so mild, had I of decided to sleep it off l most likely would have had major kidney failure or even gone into shock by the next morning. Intuition, knowing my body and knowledge about this condition saved my kidney and my life. The scary part about Rhabdo is there isn't anything the Dr's can do to stop it once it begins and they don't know how bad it will get. They can only support your body with constant IV fluids to try to buffer the effects, but your muscles continue to swell and breakdown and your kidneys are still forced to filter the massive amount of toxins. Luckily my kidney has held up like a champ! Thanks Dad! And my numbers have dropped significantly today which is a good thing. This condition is so scary, please pay attention to your body. If you have overworked your muscles, if you are sore and you can see some swelling even the slightest amount like I had, don't hesitate to go to the ER, it can save your life. I'm so grateful for my husband @dang_ale who's been by my side, cooking meals at home and bringing them to me each day, for my family and all of your love and support! ❤️️🙏✨🙏✨🙏✨🙏✨🙏

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This arm has about had it! And it's been stuck about 10 more times since this photo was taken. 💉A complication I've had while in here is my veins not wanting to give blood. Both IV's refuse to give so they have had to stick this pore arm of mine morning and night and sometimes multiple times before they get a vein. But I'm going to be honest…. I have been through worse in my life!!! So this… I don't like, I dread actually but I can handle. By the way the necklace I am wearing is a roman coin representing "Courage" I just so happened to be wearing it when I entered. It's funny how a symbol like this can remind you of what you're made of. It's easy to get caught up in the pain and fear of a situation, but if you remove yourself for a moment and step back you realize …. WAIT A SECOND! I AM MADE OF MUCH MORE THEN THIS! PUT YOUR BIG GIRL PANTIES ON AND HANDLE IT!!!!!Thank you @traceenicholsjewelry for reminding me what I'm made of! #tnjroman #courage ✨✨✨

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Look who is out of the hospital! The Dr's and nurses were amazing but I couldn't be happier to get the IV's out and head home! What a crazy experience all this has been. I was so strong up until last Saturday, now I can barely move my arms without fatigue. Last week was supposed to be the first week of on snow training leading into the 2018 Olympic/Paralympic Games, so while my teammates and competitors are neck deep in training, I'm going to be neck deep in healing. The recovery on this is supposed to take some time since the muscle fibers in both upper arms were damaged. But all of this is minor compared to what it could have been! My journey to the next Games may have taken a bit of a step back but sometimes that's what you need for a major comeback! I'm anxious to move on to this recovery stage and also rethink my approach to fitness, health and wellness. There is no need to injure ourselves getting stronger, I'm determined to being healthier then ever but by taking a more gentle path and to be honest, I hated pull-ups anyways! . Thank you to everyone for your ❤️ and support and thank you to @coppermtn for these gorgeous flowers! 🌺 #headedhome #rhabdosucks #gratitude #roadtorecovery ✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨

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Watch NBCSN profiles of star U.S. Paralympians in Rio

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NBCSN’s ongoing coverage of the Rio Paralympics includes daily stories of some of the world’s most dominant athletes.

Here’s a selection of short profiles on some of Team USA’s stars:

How Tatyana McFadden went from a Russian orphanage to Team USA’s biggest star going into the Rio Paralympics:

Jessica Long‘s path from 12-year-old Paralympic rookie through 12 gold medals to recent struggles:

How Jamie Whitmore dealt with a cancer diagnosis as the most accomplished off-road triathlete:

Lex Gillette reflects on losing his sight at 8 years old and finding track and field:

Jarryd Wallace looks back on the decision to amputate his right leg at age 20 and the Paralympic goals he immediately set and reached:

How Dartanyon Crockett uses a musical instrument as an outlet from judo:

Winter Paralympic medalist Amy Purdy looks ahead to dancing in the Opening Ceremony:

Amy Purdy, Winter Paralympic medalist, to perform at Rio Paralympic Opening Ceremony

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Amy Purdy made her name as a snowboardcross bronze medalist at the Sochi Paralympics and runner-up on “Dancing with the Stars” in 2014.

In September, she’ll combine both.

Purdy will perform as a dancer in the Rio Paralympic Opening Ceremony on Sept. 7, in addition to being an NBC reporter during the Games.

She was told her performance will be four to five minutes. On “Dancing with the Stars,” her performances were about 90 seconds, she said. She traveled to Rio for a week of rehearsals in July.

Purdy, 36, survived bacterial meningitis in 1999 but lost both her legs and later needed a kidney from her father at age 20.

“I’m most excited about the concept of this dance,” Purdy said. “Just the idea of man versus machine. A lot of times we feel really limited because of our prosthetics. But this dance, hopefully, will kind of shatter those borders a little bit and allow me to move my body in a way I haven’t done before.”

Purdy is an innovator. She built her own snowboard and is seen as instrumental in getting her sport into the Paralympic program beginning in 2014.

A model, she’s been in a Madonna music video, a Super Bowl commercial, ESPN the Magazine’s Body Issue and competed on “The Amazing Race” in 2012.

MORE: Rio Paralympic broadcast schedule