Anna Shcherbakova

Anna Shcherbakova extends Russian teen figure skating reign at Cup of China

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Anna Shcherbakova extended the new reign of Russian 15- and 16-year-olds, making it four wins in four Grand Prix events this season for her group.

Shcherbakova, 15, comfortably took Cup of China by 14.86 points over Japanese veteran Satoko Miyahara, totaling 226.04. Another Russian, the 2015 World champion Elizaveta Tuktamysheva, was third.

Shcherbakova became the first woman to qualify for December’s six-skater Grand Prix Final by coupling her Cup of China title with her Skate America crown from three weeks ago.

She did so by landing a pair of quadruple Lutzes in Saturday’s free skate — changing her blue costume to a red one mid-performance — just as she did at Skate America (though one quad was deemed under-rotated in Chongqing).

Countrywomen Alexandra Trusova and Alena Kostornaia, 15- and 16-year-olds taught quads (Trusova) and the triple Axel (Kostornaia) by the same coaches as Shcherbakova, won the previous two Grand Prix events. They compete separately in the last two competitions the next two weeks, looking to make it an unprecedented Russian women’s sweep of the series leading into the Final.

China’s Jin Boyang took the men’s title by overtaking countryman and short-program leader Han Yan. Jin, a two-time world bronze medalist, earned his first Grand Prix title by 12.08 points, landing two quads in Saturday’s free skate.

Jin is questionable to qualify for the Grand Prix Final, however, since he was sixth at Skate America. He is ranked third in the world by best scores this season behind Yuzuru Hanyu and Nathan Chen, who are expected to headline the Final.

China also went one-two in pairs, led by world champions and Olympic silver medalists Sui Wenjing and Han Cong. Sui and Han, who missed the last Grand Prix season due to her stress fracture in her right foot, tallied 228.37 points in their season debut. It’s the highest score in the world this season, supplanting Russians Aleksandra Boikova and Dmitriy Kozlovskiy by 11.66.

Earlier in ice dance, Russians Victoria Sinitsina and Nikita Katsalapov held on to beat Madison Chock and Evan Bates by 1.35 despite the Americans topping the free dance.

Chock and Bates, who missed the last Grand Prix season due to Chock’s recovery from ankle surgery, earned their seventh straight Grand Prix runner-up finish (not counting Grand Prix Finals).

They will likely clinch a spot in their fifth straight Grand Prix Final spot (not counting last season’s injury absence) and rank fifth in the world this season.

Cup of China
Women
1. Anna Shcherbakova (RUS) — 226.04
2. Satoko Miyahara (JPN) — 211.18
3. Elizaveta Tuktamysheva (RUS) — 209.10

4. You Young (KOR) — 191.81
5. Sofia Samodurova (RUS) — 185.29
6. Amber Glenn (USA) — 178.35
7. Marin Honda (JPN) — 168.09
8. Yi Christy Leung (HKG) — 157.47
9. Chen Hongyi (CHN) — 155.12
10. Kailani Craine (AUS) — 149.83
11. Zhu Yi (CHN) — 139.63
12. Choi Yujin (KOR) — 131.48

Men
1. Jin Boyang (CHN) — 261.53

2. Yan Han (CHN) — 249.45
3. Matteo Rizzo (ITA) — 241.88
4. Keegan Messing (CAN) — 237.36
5. Keiji Tanaka (JPN) — 233.62
6. Cha Junhwan (KOR) — 222.26
7. Brendan Kerry (AUS) — 220.31
8. Camden Pulkinen (USA) — 218.67
9. Zhang He (CHN) — 217.42
10. Andrei Lazukin (RUS) — 210.01
11. Conrad Orzel (CAN) — 192.60
12. Chih-I Tsao (TPE) — 186.82

Pairs
1. Sui Wenjing/Han Cong (CHN) — 228.37

2. Peng Cheng/Jin Yang (CHN) — 199.97
3. Lyubov Ilyushechkina/Charlie Bilodeau (CAN) — 190.73
4. Nicole Della Monica/Matteo Guarise (ITA) — 182.88
5. Ryom Tae Ok/Kim Ju Sik (PRK) — 179.55
6. Tarah Kayne/Danny O’Shea (USA) — 178.79
7. Tang Feiyao/Yang Yongchao (CHN) — 172.53
8. Alisa Efimova/Alexander Korovin (RUS) — 170.19

Ice Dance
1. Victoria Sinitsina/Nikita Katsalapov (RUS) — 209.90
2. Madison Chock/Evan Bates (USA) — 208.55
3. Laurence Fournier Beaudry/Nikolaj Sorensen (CAN) — 190.74
4. Wang Shiyue/Liu Xinyu (CHN) — 186.45
5. Katilin Hawayek/Jean-Luc Baker (USA) — 179.96
6. Sofia Evdokimova/Egor Bazin (RUS) — 169.27
7. Anastasia Skoptcova/Kirill Aleshin (RUS) — 169.24
8. Chen Hong/Sun Zhuoming (CHN) — 162.91
9. Guo Yuzhu/Zhao Pengkun (CHN) — 150.91
10. Misato Komatsubara/Tim Koleto (JPN) — 145.35

As a reminder, you can watch the events from the 2019-20 figure skating season live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.

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MORE: Canada seeks new figure skating stars after gold-medal retirements

Anna Shcherbakova one step closer to Grand Prix Final

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Skate America champion Anna Shcherbakova of Russia is within striking distance of locking up a spot at the Grand Prix Final after leading the pack in the short program at the Cup of China on Friday.

Despite an edge call on the triple Lutz in her jump combination, Shcherbakova scored 73.51 points to out-distance Japan’s Satoko Miyahara by 4.6 points. Miyahara was called for under-rotations on the triple toe of her triple Lutz, triple toe combination as well as her solo triple loop.

The ladies’ short program rules don’t allow for quadruple jumps, but Shcherbakova executed two in her free skate at Skate America a few weeks ago. She’s expected to match that program content in her free skate in Chonqing.

A late addition to the field, American Amber Glenn, sits third with 67.69 points. In an event marred by under-rotations and edge calls, Glenn’s was the only clean short program.

Meanwhile, 2015 world champion Elizaveta Tuktamysheva of Russia is fourth after falling on a triple Axel attempt. She won Cup of China in 2014. Countrywoman Sofia Samodurova, the reigning European champion, is fifth with 63.99 points.

China’s Yan Han and Jin Boyang lead the men’s field with 86.46 points and 85.34 points, respectively. Yan did not compete during the 2018-19 post-Olympic season, but Friday, skated to his short program from PyeongChang (“A Thousand Years” by Christina Perri) with a new coach.

Jin, a two-time world championships bronze medalist, placed sixth at Skate America earlier this season. He fell on an opening quad Lutz attempt, but put two quads in his short program with a quad toe, double toe combination.

Italy’s Matteo Rizzo is third with 81.72 points while American Camden Pulkinen, in his first season on the senior Grand Prix, sits fourth with 78.92 points. They each fell one time: Rizzo on a jump combination, and Pulkinen on his opening quad toe attempt.

In ice dance, Russians Viktoria Sinitsina and Nikita Katsalapov have a five-point lead over Americans Madison Chock and Evan Bates headed into Saturday’s free dance. Chock and Bates won a silver medal last weekend at Grand Prix France, while this is the Russian’s first Grand Prix event of the season. They are also expected to compete at home at Rostelecom Cup next weekend.

In pairs, it’s no surprise that two-time world champions Sui Wenjing and Han Cong lead after the short program with 80.90 points after a clean performance that included side-by-side triple toes and a throw triple flip. Canada’s Liubov Ilyushechkina and Charlie Bilodeau are second with 69.98 points followed by China’s second pair in the field, Peng Cheng and Yang Jin (68.50 points).

The lone Americans in the field, Tarah Kayne and Danny O’Shea, sit fifth with 64.08 points.

All of the free skates at Cup of China continue Saturday morning. A full broadcast schedule is here.

Cup of China
Rhythm dance
1. Sinitsina/Katsalapov (RUS) — 85.39

2. Chock/Bates (USA) — 80.34
3. Fournier Beaudry/Sorensen (CAN) — 78.41
4. Wang/Liu (CHN) — 74.77
5. Hawayek/Baker (USA) — 74.70
6. Skoptcova/Aleshin (RUS) — 69.19
7. Evdokimova/Bazin (RUS) — 64.07
8. Chen/Sun (CHN) — 61.83
9. Guo/Zhao (CHN) — 57.10
10. Komatsubara/Koleto (JPN) — 56.60

Women
1. Anna Shcherbakova (RUS) — 73.51
2. Satoko Miyahara (JPN) — 68.91
3. Amber Glenn (USA) — 67.69
4. Elizaveta Tuktamysheva (RUS) — 65.57
5. Sofia Samodurova (RUS) — 63.99
6. Marin Honda (JPN) — 61.73
7. Young You (KOR) — 61.49
8. Yi Christy Leung (HKG) — 53.90
9. Yi Zhu (CHN) — 53.19
10. Kailani Craine (AUS) — 53.01
11. Hongyi Chen (CHN) — 49.44
12. Yujin Choi (KOR) — 48.75

Men
1. Yan Han (CHN) — 86.46
2. Jin Boyang (CHN) — 85.43
3. Matteo Rizzo (ITA) — 81.72
4. Camden Pulkinen (USA) — 78.92
5. Keegan Messing (CAN) — 76.80
6. Zhang He (CHN) — 76.03
7. Keiji Tanaka (JPN) — 74.64
8. Andrei Lazukin (RUS) — 74.31
9. Brendan Kerry (AUS) — 73.96
10. Conrad Orzel (CAN) — 72.22
11. Cha Junh-wan (KOR) — 69.40
12. Chih-I Tsao (TPE) — 64.07

Pairs
1. Sui/Han (CHN) — 80.90
2. Ilyushechkina/Bilodeau (CAN) — 68.98

3. Peng/Yin (CHN) — 68.50 
4. Della Monica/Guarise (ITA) — 64.24
5. Kayne/O’Shea (USA) — 64.08
6. Efimova/Korovin (RUS) — 63.97
7. Tang/Yang (CHN) — 61.85
8. Ryom/Kim (PRK) — 60.50

MORE: Madison Chock, Evan Bates back on Grand Prix circuit with ‘new power’

As a reminder, you can watch the events from the 2019-20 figure skating season live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.

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At Skate America, what happened in Vegas won’t stay in Vegas

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LAS VEGAS — As always in Sin City, there were highs, along with a few lows. Final thoughts from Skate America …

Reign of the A’s: The start of the Grand Prix series marked the debut of the trio some fans call the “3As” — Alexandra Trusova, Anna Shcherbakova and Alena Kostornaia, the Russian teens who among them won seven Junior Grand Prix events last season. Trusova also captured the world junior crown. (There are other young Russian “As,” but we’ll stick with these three for now.)

What’s chilling for their competitors, and any coach not named Eteri Tutberidze, is that the three skaters have a chance of duplicating the feat this season in the senior ranks: win every Grand Prix plus the world crown, with a raft of Challenger Series events thrown in for good measure.

At Skate America, Shcherbakova, 15, brushed off a fourth-place short program by landing two quadruple Lutzes in her free skate, one in combination.

The 33.45 points earned for the jumps contributed mightily to her 92.2-point technical score, more than compensating for two under-rotation deductions later in the program. Despite holding a 7.5-point lead after the short, and earning higher program component scores for a nearly-clean free skate, silver medalist Bradie Tennell couldn’t begin to fend off the young Russian.

Tennell’s challenge continues: The 2018 U.S. champion faces Trusova at Skate Canada this weekend. Trusova broke the free-skate record (163.78 points) at a Challenger event in Slovakia last month, hitting three quads. Needless to say, she won.

In Vegas, Shcherbakova acknowledged internal competition at Tutberidze’s Moscow training rink.

“Of course, we practice together and see what (the) other girls are jumping,” she said. “Every day we want to improve more and more, because we see the other girls do more quads.”

Tennell took positives from Vegas, including a personal-best short program (75.10). But at the final press conference, she couldn’t hide a bit of frustration to this reporter’s admittedly leading question about how difficult it was to mute the quad talk.

“When you hear something over and over, it’s kind of like reprimanding a child. They just start tune it out,” Tennell said. “Everybody is so quad-crazy. … For me, it’s just better to tune out all of the buzz and focus on what I can do well.”

MORE: Tennell’s personality breaks through at Skate America

Skaters, check your protocols: Not only did the 21-year-old Tennell have quads to contend with, but a scoring error by the technical panel shaved several points off of her free skate. The error had no impact on the Skate America standings, but points earned during Grand Prix events are used to break ties to decide who competes at the Grand Prix Final.

Tennell opened her free skate with her most difficult element, a triple Lutz-triple toe loop combination. She executed the same combination in the second half of her program, but the panel identified it as a triple-double.

Per ISU rules, an appeal is not permitted except in the case of an incorrect mathematical calculation; wrong identification of an element does not qualify. The rules do allow for a correction to be made, however, when an element misidentification is brought to the referee’s attention prior to the award ceremony. A spokesman for U.S. Figure Skating said that the organization did go to the ISU prior to the award ceremony, and was only told that an appeal was not permitted. No correction was made and Tennell’s score stood.

An ISU technical specialist, who consented to be interviewed about procedures, explained.

“Technical specialists call (identify) elements, which data entry operators enter into the judging system,” the technical specialist said. “At the end of the program, the data entry operator reads the list of elements, and the technical controller and assistant technical controller review the list for accuracy. Somehow, the error escaped notice.”

“Things like this should not happen,” Denise Myers, Tennell’s coach, relayed via text. “This is only the second time in my career (an error like this) happened.”

“I will say, every time something unusual happens, the ISU reviews the procedure and asks, ‘How can we prevent it from happening again?’” the technical specialist said. “This time, it was caught too late. If it had been caught before the ceremony started, it could have been changed … but human beings are not machines.”

No rest for U.S. ice dancers: Madison Hubbell and Zach Donohue defended their Skate America title, the 11th straight time a U.S. couple won the event. With Donohue suffering a severe bout of bronchitis, the couple showed a well-earned sight of relief.

Still, the world bronze medalists narrowly lost the free dance to Aleksandra Stepanova and Ivan Bukin of Russia, fourth in the world last season.

“There were good things and not-so-good things,” Hubbell said after the free dance to country-rock music from “A Star Is Born,” later adding, “It felt like there was a lot of energy missing. … It wasn’t the kind of performance we know we can give in that program.”

Antibiotics are on the menu for Donohue; he and Hubbell compete at Skate Canada in Kelowna, B.C., this week.

There, they will not face a world top-five dance couple. But the free dance result at their home Grand Prix shows the tough competition among the handful ranked below Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron of France. The two-time U.S. champions will want to make a statement in Kelowna.

“I hope to have two healthy lungs for Skate Canada,” Donohue said.

MORE: Hubbell, Donohue give U.S. ice dance 11 straight Skate America titles

A high for Denney and Frazier: Still just 23 and 26, respectively, Haven Denney and Brandon Frazier have had a roller-coaster career, marked by coaching changes and Denney’s severe knee injury that forced them to sit out the entire 2015-16 season.

Judging by their free skate, the roller coaster is on the ascent. Spectacular lifts and clean triple Salchows gave the U.S. silver medalists the second-highest technical score of the day, and a career-high 125.36 points. Their bronze is their third Skate America medal.

“Man, I told Haven a week ago that sometimes there’s been more stress than there needs to be to compete,” an emotional Frazier said. “I just want to enjoy it again. … I haven’t felt like this in a long time. We know there is a lot of pressure on these jumps, we want to hit them more than anything, and this was the first baby step in rebuilding our foundation.”

“I like to think outside of the box, I come up with some crazy things sometimes,” the skaters’ coach, John Zimmerman, said of the lifts, including a thrilling variation of “fly high, say bye” at the end of the routine. “They both have a lot of courage.”

Chen hip-hops on: In his teleconference prior to Skate America, Nathan Chen told reporters “three quads are a given” in his free skate. He was as good as his word, hitting Salchow, flip and toe to “Rocket Man.”

He also performed a hip-hop sequence so entertaining that coach Rafael Arutunian said, “you cannot feel he has blades on. He manipulates his feet like he is in shoes.” He won by 44 points over Jason Brown, who debuted a stirring free to “Schindler’s List.”

Not much else to say, except that Chen’s top competition in Vegas – Jin Boyang of China – looked way out of sorts, falling twice in his free on usually reliable quads.

After a strong short, bronze medalist Dmitri Aliev of Russia was sloppy in his free, making jump mistakes and not performing his choreography up to his capabilities. Their inconsistency shows why Brown – always armed with well-trained choreography, ready to wring out every possible point in steps and spins – is able to use his skating skills and showmanship to stay near the top, despite not performing quads.

Correction: An earlier version of this article mischaracterized the scoring issue related to Tennell’s free skate. It wasn’t that U.S. Figure Skating did not file an appeal, it’s that one was not permitted under the circumstances. 

MORE: Jason Brown on concussions, delayed start to season

MORE: Karen Chen balances Skate America with Cornell

As a reminder, you can watch the events from the 2019-20 figure skating season live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!