Australia

Rohan Dennis repeats as world time trial champion ahead of teen

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Australian Rohan Dennis, in his first race since quitting the Tour de France the day before that Grand Tour’s time trial, repeated as world champion in the time trial on Wednesday.

“Obviously, there’s been a lot of talk since Tour de France about what I’m doing,” Dennis said. “It’s just really special to back up this year. … To show that I haven’t hung the bike up.”

Dennis, 29, dominated by winning in 1 hour, 5 minutes, 10 seconds, beating 19-year-old Belgian Remco Evenepoel by 1:08 in a 33-mile time trial in Yorkshire, Great Britain.

Lawson Craddock was the top American in sixth. Full results are here.

“It’s been a lot tougher than what it looked out there,” Dennis said. “It was absolutely perfect today.”

Dennis was a bit of a wild card coming into Wednesday given the last two months.

He was last seen in competition on July 18, abandoning the Tour without explanation with about 50 miles left on the 12th stage, one day before he would be among the favorites to win the time trial. Dennis had not raced since.

He won individual time trials at all three Grand Tours and held the hour record for two months in 2015.

All this after a decorated track cycling career, including a 2012 Olympic team pursuit silver medal and a pair of world titles in that discipline. Dennis’ best Grand Tour finish was 16th in the 2018 Giro d’Italia.

Evenepoel, the 2018 World junior champion in the road race and time trial, became the youngest-ever male podium finisher in a senior worlds event, according to Gracenote.

MORE: World Road Cycling Championships TV Schedule

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Susie O’Neill in tears watching 2000 Olympic butterfly final for first time

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Australian swimming legend Susie O’Neill broke down in tears before watching the full 2000 Olympic 200m butterfly final for the first time on Monday.

O’Neill, then the world-record holder known across the country as “Madame Butterfly,” was relegated to silver by American Misty Hyman in one of the most seismic upsets of the entire Sydney Games.

She was a guest on an Australia radio show on Monday when she sat down to watch the race.

“I’m already having a physical reaction,” she said while looking at an image of herself in the ready room from 19 years ago. “I’m feeling emotional. Isn’t it weird? My default is one of um … [starts crying] … my default is I just want to crack a joke. I know it’s only a swimming race. And I know in my head I didn’t fail, but with that I just see failure. … I felt like this was my race, home crowd and to come second for me is failure.”

O’Neill was the defending Olympic champion, had not lost a major 200m fly since before the Atlanta Games and, at Australia’s Olympic Trials, took down an 18-year-old world record in the event, the oldest on the swimming books.

The day before the 200m fly final, O’Neill won the 200m freestyle, “an event I didn’t care about,” she said. O’Neill said she didn’t think she was beatable in the 200m fly.

“I’m a nervous competitor, but it’s the worst nerves I’ve ever felt,” she said. “Maybe I was too arrogant. I’m not sure. Maybe I’d lost too much energy from not sleeping night after night.”

Hyman was the world bronze medalist but came into the Olympics with a personal best that was 3.46 seconds slower than O’Neill’s world record.

“Not in my wildest dreams what I thought was a legitimate competitor to me,” O’Neill said Monday. “She was a nothing to me.”

Yet O’Neill trailed at every turn. Hyman won in 2:05.88, the second-fastest 200m fly in history and a personal best by 1.99 seconds. O’Neill finished seventh tenths back.

“I’m still trying to find reasons, even 19 years later,” O’Neill said, watching the race. “I didn’t swim much slower than my best, so in my head, again, I should say, well, I did as well as I could have.”

It would be the last major individual race of her career. O’Neill retired two months after the Sydney Games.

“I’ve moved on to other things,” O’Neill said after watching the race Monday, still in tears. “I’m not a failure.”

Australia’s female swimming star of the last several years, Cate Campbell, said watching the footage of O’Neill on Monday was “almost like looking in a mirror,” according to the Sydney Morning Herald. Campbell broke the 100m free world record one month before the 2016 Olympics, then finished sixth in Rio.

“What was really interesting was that the fear of watching it was worse than actually watching it [for O’Neill],” Campbell said, according to the newspaper. “You can see the emotional scars and the pain that leaves on you.

“All of the things she had done to try and cope, I had done as well. You want to fend it off. You don’t want to face it head on. When we [athletes]fail, we feel it much more deeply than anyone ever could. I hope that people will learn to be kinder from seeing more reactions like this.”

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Spain, Argentina turn back the clock to meet for FIBA World Cup title

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It’s been seven years since Spain’s men’s basketball team last played for a global title. For Argentina, it was 15 years ago.

After favorites U.S. and Serbia exited the FIBA World Cup early, it’s two of Team USA’s old rivals that will play for the championship in China on Sunday.

Spain overtook Australia 95-88 in two overtimes to reach its first Olympic or world final since the 2012 London Games. The Spaniards, led by Marc Gasol‘s 33 points, rallied from an 11-point third-quarter deficit. A full box score is here.

In Friday’s later semifinal, Argentina doused France 80-66 behind 39-year-old Luis Scola, the last remaining link to its 2004 Olympic title team. Scola had 28 points and 13 rebounds and received an “M-V-P” chant from teammates in the locker room. A full box score is here.

Athens 2004 was the last time Argentina advanced this far at an Olympics or worlds. Manu Ginobili and Andres Nocioni retired after the Rio Olympics, where the Argentine Golden Generation bowed out in the quarterfinals.

Spain followed Argentina as the world’s dominant basketball nation, aside from the U.S., in the 2000s.

Spain captured the 2006 World Cup and then lost two straight Olympic finals to the Americans. Its current roster is missing some of those now-retired stars. Its stalwart, 39-year-old Pau Gasol, is out after left foot surgery.

“Now it’s our turn to pass on the legacy to the next generation,” 34-year-old Marc Gasol said.

Australia just missed clinching its first Olympic or world medal. NBA veteran Matthew Dellavedova missed a one-handed running floater as time expired in the first overtime. San Antonio Spurs guard Patty Mills had game highs of 34 points and 45 minutes played.

The Aussies can still reach that first podium in Sunday’s bronze-medal game against France.

“The experience we had in Rio and the feeling of what it felt like to finish fourth when we had a chance to win a bronze and seeing how much that hurt everybody … I have the confidence that this group will be able to refocus,” Australia coach Andrej Lemanis said.

NBC Olympics senior researcher Rachel Thompson contributed to this report from China.

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