Beatrice Chepkoech

Christian Coleman beats Justin Gatlin for the first time; Pre Classic recap

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Christian Coleman used to look up to Justin Gatlin, a fellow former University of Tennessee athlete. But now it’s Coleman who is firmly atop U.S. and world sprinting, consolidating fastest man status by beating the world champion Gatlin for the first time at the Pre Classic on Sunday.

Coleman clocked 9.81 seconds with a trace of headwind, lowering his fastest time in the world this year from 9.85. Gatlin, 37, was strong to take second in 9.87, his first sub-10 since becoming the oldest world champ in 2017, his fastest time since winning the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials and the fastest ever for somebody that old.

“I ask that same question every day I wake up and my muscles hurt,” Gatlin said of defying age. “I get out of bed and am like, how am I doing this? I have a goal set, and I want to go ’til 2020. I want to take my son to the Olympics, at that’ll be the end of my show.”

Coleman is the only man in the world to break 9.85 seconds in 2017, 2018 or 2019, doing so all three years in this Olympic cycle. Quite a rise for a man who was sixth at the Rio Olympic trials.

“Obviously we’re friends,” Coleman said of Gatlin in an interview with Lewis Johnson on NBC. “I’m just happy I’m able to compete against somebody like him.”

The Pre Classic relocated to Stanford, Calif., from its usual home in Eugene, Ore., while Hayward Field undergoes reconstruction ahead of the 2020 Olympic Trials.

Full Pre Classic results are here. The Diamond Leagues moves to Lausanne, Switzerland, for its next meet Friday, featuring Noah Lyles in the 200m. Athletes are preparing for the USATF Outdoor Championships in three weeks, when the top three per event are in line to make the team for the September/October world championships in Doha.

In other events Sunday, Caster Semenya won her 31st straight 800m dating to 2015, clocking 1:55.70 to prevail by a hefty 2.66 seconds over American record holder Ajeé Wilson.

The two-time Olympic champion from South Africa was allowed to race by the Swiss Supreme Court, which ordered her temporarily eligible while she appeals a Court of Arbitration for Sport decision upholding the IAAF’s rule capping testosterone in female events between the 400m and mile.

Semenya was asked whether she thought about going for the 35-year-old world record of 1:53.28 or whether she considered the fact it could be her last 800m given the court’s looming decision. “Not really,” was her response to both questions.

“Flying into the U.S., it’s not easy to run here,” Semenya said. “Other people’s perceptions is not my problem. My problem is to have my shit together.”

Wilson, the world bronze medalist, was glad to see Semenya cleared to race.

“Absolutely I think she should be allowed to run,” she said. “I think everybody should be allowed to participate. The parameters surrounding that, I’m not sure about, but I definitely think she should be able to do what she wants.”

What’s next for Semenya is uncertain. She plans to take four weeks off before resuming her circuit, and will await the final ruling from the Swiss court.

Michael Norman extended an undefeated 400m streak dating to the start of 2018, clocking 44.62 against a field that lacked Olympic champions Wayde van NiekerkKirani James and LaShawn Merritt. Norman, who on April 20 clocked 43.45, said he was coming down with a bit of a cold.

Ivorian Marie-Josee Ta Lou upset two-time Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and NCAA champion Sha’Carri Richardson to win the 100m in 11.02. Fraser-Pryce ran 10.73 nine days earlier to become the fastest mom in history, while Richardson clocked 10.75 three weeks ago for a world junior record.

Nigerian Blessing Okagbare upset the Olympic, world, European and U.S. champions in the 200m in 22.05. Rio gold medalist Elaine Thompson, who was second, remains fastest in the world this year in 22.00.

Rai Benjamin recorded the ninth-fastest 400m hurdles ever, 47.16. Benjamin, who switched representation from Antigua and Barbuda to the U.S. last year, knocked absent Qatari rival Abderrahman Samba (47.27) off the top of the 2019 world rankings.

Kenyan Beatrice Chepkoech ran the fifth-fastest 3000m steeplechase in history. She crossed in 8:55.58, which was 11.26 seconds off her world record from 2018. World champion Emma Coburn showed she’s again a medal contender, beating the other three fastest Kenyans in history for second place in 9:04.90 despite falling in a race for the third time this year.

Vashti Cunningham, the Olympian daughter of retired All Pro quarterback Randall Cunningham, became the eighth U.S. woman to clear two meters in the high jump. But she fell to 0-8 in her career against Russian Mariya Lasitskene, who cleared 2.04.

Olympic champion Faith Kipyegon sprinted past Laura Muir to win the 1500m in her first race since Sept. 1, 2017, following childbirth. Kipyegon clocked 3:59.04, edging Muir by .43 and U.S. champion Shelby Houlihan by .61.

Louisiana-born Swede Mondo Duplantis won in his second pole vault competition since turning pro after his freshman year at LSU. Duplantis cleared 5.93 meters to hand world champion Sam Kendricks his first loss in four Diamond League meets this season.

Ethiopian-born Dutchwoman Sifan Hassan ran the sixth-fastest women’s 3000m in history in 8:18.49. The time was bettered only by three dubious Chinese athletes between two days in Beijing in September 1993 in the non-Olympic event.

Olympic champ Ryan Crouser was upset in the shot put by Brazilian Darlan Romani who launched 22.61 meters for the best throw in Diamond League history.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Sydney McLaughlin takes on Olympic, world champions; Oslo preview, TV schedule

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For as much as Sydney McLaughlin has accomplished already, there is still much to prove.

The 19-year-old phenom races her most competitive 400m hurdles in two years at a Diamond League meet in Oslo on Thursday (1 p.m. ET, NBC Sports Gold, and 2 p.m. ET, NBCSN).

“It’s going to be a good experience to see what it’s like to race with high-level competition,” McLaughlin said by phone from Norway, where she will make her Diamond League 400m hurdles debut. “It’s going to become a normal thing. The first one is exciting and a little nerve-racking to get the experience and see what it’s like.”

She takes on 2016 Olympic champion Dalilah Muhammad, 2017 World champion Kori Carter and 2015 World silver medalist Shamier Little in an appetizer for next month’s USATF Outdoor Championships, where the top three finishers qualify for the fall world championships (aside from the already qualified Carter).

In 2016, McLaughlin became the youngest U.S. track and field athlete to compete at an Olympics in 44 years, reaching the semifinals in Rio. Last year, as a freshman at Kentucky, she lowered personal bests in the 200m, 400m and 400m hurdles, all by more than a second, and ran the world’s fastest 400m hurdles of 2018 by .57.

After winning the 2018 NCAA Championships, McLaughlin said that, although she still wanted to see a ton of improvement in her young career, “once it comes together, hopefully the world record will go.”

A year later, McLaughlin said she’s not looking at any time goals this season, her first since turning pro and moving to Southern California to train under 2004 Olympic 100m hurdles champion Joanna Hayes.

“I have my whole career to chase something like that,” McLaughlin said of the world record of 52.34, set by Russian Yuliya Pechonkina in 2003. McLaughlin has studied many races of Lashinda Demus, the American record holder at 52.47, “because she was so aggressive from beginning to end, and she made it look so effortless.”

“This year for me is kind of adjusting to everything, being a professional, being with a new coach, being in a new atmosphere,” she continued. “Everything is brand-new right now.”

McLaughlin will focus on making her first world championships team in one of the U.S.’ strongest events. In the last world championships year, she finished sixth at 2017 Nationals in the fastest 400m hurdles race in history.

Though she was also fourth-fastest in the U.S. in the flat 400m last year, McLaughlin said she hasn’t discussed going for a double this year or next (the 400m and 400m hurdles overlap at worlds this year and also to a lesser extent at the Olympics).

She has never beaten Muhammad, who with Little and Carter took the top three spots at nationals in 2017 to make that world team. This would be the most impressive win of McLaughlin’s life.

Here are the Oslo entry lists. Here’s the schedule of events (all times Eastern):

1 — Women’s High Jump
1:15 — Women’s Shot Put
1:30 — Men’s Pole Vault
2:03 — Women’s 400m Hurdles
2:11 — Men’s 800m
2:16 — Women’s 800m
2:17 — Women’s Triple Jump
2:25 — Men’s 3000m
2:30 — Men’s Javelin
2:47 — Women’s 100m Hurdles
3 — Men’s 100m
3:10 — Women’s 3000m Steeplechase
3:32 — Men’s 400m Hurdles
3:41 — Women’s 200m
3:51 — Men’s Mile

Here are five events to watch:

Women’s 400m Hurdles — 2:03 p.m. ET
A pretty strong argument that Muhammad is the favorite. She’s broken 54 seconds in her last four races dating to last season, all wins, and owns the world’s fastest time this year (53.61) and this Olympic cycle (52.64). McLaughlin boasts a 52.75 from the May 2018 SEC Championships and opened with a 54.14 this season. This is the first international 400m hurdles of McLaughlin’s pro career. It will be the biggest harbinger for nationals next month in Des Moines.

Men’s 3000m — 2:25 p.m. ET
Muktar Edris, who upset Mo Farah to win the last world title at 5000m, takes on two of the three fastest 5000m men from last year, Yomif Kejelcha and Selemon Barega, in an Ethiopian clash. The U.S. sends Ben True, the first American man to win a Diamond League distance race (in 2015), and Drew Hunter, who in 2016 became the eighth U.S. high schooler to break four minutes in the mile. This meet is key for Edris, who hasn’t raced on the top international level yet this year and was 10 seconds behind in the epic Brussels 5000m with Kejelcha and Barega at last season’s Diamond League finals.

Men’s Javelin — 2:30 p.m. ET
Strongest field of the meet? The top four men so far this year. The top five from last year. And the Nos. 2 and 3 all time in Germans Johannes Vetter and Thomas Röhler, the reigning world and Olympic champions. Yet again, they will try to crack into the top four throws of all time, all held by retired Czech legend Jan Zelezny. The magic number is 94.64 meters. Vetter, competing for the first time since August, has thrown 94.44; Röhler 93.90.

Men’s 100m — 3 p.m. ET
Christian Coleman is a strong favorite here in the absence of new rival Noah Lyles. The top threats are countryman Mike Rodgers and Brits Reece Prescod and CJ Ujah, but Rodgers and Prescod didn’t make Coleman sweat in Shanghai on May 18, and Ujah’s lone 100m this season was a 10.13. Expect Coleman to eye 9.85, which would give him the 2019 world lead outright.

Women’s 3000m Steeplechase — 3:10 p.m. ET
World champion Emma Coburn faces world-record holder Beatrice Chepkoech for the first time this season. Coburn eyes her first win in a race with Chepkoech or fellow Kenyans Celliphine Chespol or Hyvin Kiyeng outside of the 2017 Worlds. And her second Diamond League victory to pair with a stunner in Shanghai in 2014, when the favored East Africans let her go, reportedly thinking she was a pacer.

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Christian Coleman runs world’s fastest 100m in three years

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Christian Coleman sprinted to take something at the Diamond League final in Brussels. He got it.

The world’s best sprinter since Usain Bolt‘s retirement ran the world’s fastest 100m in three years, 9.79 seconds into a headwind on Friday night. Adjusting for wind and altitude, it may have been the best sprint ever outside of the Bolt era.

“Mine,” Coleman repeated in a head-shaking, chest-thumping, finger-pointing celebration.

Coleman, a Rio Olympic 4x100m prelim runner, capped a roller-coaster season following his breakout 2017, when he ran a 40-yard dash one tenth faster than the NFL Combine record and beat Bolt to a 100m silver medal at the world championships behind Justin Gatlin.

He returned in the winter indoor season to three times run under the 60m world record. Coleman then struggled with hamstring problems in the spring and lost his first two 100m races.

Coleman took June off from meets to heal up. When he returned, Coleman won a pair of 100m races in July and August, but each time the runner-up clocked the same time to the hundredth. Coleman also developed a tendency to start strong, with the rest of the field gaining on him in the last half.

Not so Friday.

Coleman stormed out of the blocks as usual, but he kept enough of a lead that he eased crossing the finish ahead of countryman Ronnie Baker, who had the world’s fastest time of 2018 (9.87). Coleman won by .14, with Baker losing nearly a tenth freezing in the starting blocks.

“I came into the whole week with a chip on my shoulder that people had stopped talking about me,” Coleman said, according to Reuters. “They forgot everything I did last year and at the indoors. I mean you can’t blame them.”

Full Brussels results are here.

The outdoor track and field season concludes in earnest with the IAAF Continental Cup next weekend, streaming live on NBC Sports Gold and airing on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA.

In other events Friday, Ethiopian Selemon Barega ran the sixth-fastest 5000m in history, a 12:43.02.

American revelation Shelby Houlihan lost a 1500m for the first time this season, unable to catch Brit Laura Muir in the final straightaway of the 1500m. Muir clocked 3:58.49, edging Houlihan by .45.

Houlihan, 11th at the Olympics and 13th at the 2017 Worlds in the 5000m, this year won two Diamond League 1500m races, plus swept the 1500m and 5000m at the U.S. Championships and broke the American 5000m record.

Olympic champion Brianna McNeal edged world-record holder Kendra Harrison in the 100m hurdles, 12.61 to 12.63, to cut Harrison’s lead in their 2018 head-to-head to 3-2.

Double Olympic gold medalist Christian Taylor was beaten by Cuban-born Portuguese rival Pedro Pablo Pichardo in the triple jump. Pichardo is set to end Taylor’s three-year reign as the year-end world No. 1. Taylor chose the non-global championship year to focus on trying to break 45 seconds in the 400m.

Mondo Duplantis, the recent Louisiana high school graduate pole vaulter for Sweden, surprisingly bowed out at 5.83 meters. Two weeks ago, Duplantis cleared 6.05 meters at the European Championships. Russian Timur Morgonov won Friday by clearing 5.93 meters.

Bahrain’s Salwa Eid Naser won the 400m in 49.33, topping world champion Phyllis Francis and U.S. champion Shakim Wimbley. The field lacked Olympic gold and silver medalists Shaunae Miller-Uibo and Allyson Felix.

Miller-Uibo owns the fastest time in the world of 2018 (48.97). Felix has scarcely competed in this non-global championship season.

Kenyans went one-two-three in the women’s 3000m steeplechase, led by world-record holder Beatrice Chepkoech in 8:55.10. World champion Emma Coburn of the U.S. was fourth in 9:05.61.

Croatian Sandra Perković finished outside the top two of a discus competition for the first time since 2014. The Olympic and world champion was bettered by Cuban Yaime Perez (65 meters) and Brazilian Andressa de Morais (64.65).

Olympic triple jump champion Caterine Ibargüen of Colombia added a Diamond League season title in the long jump, though the final lacked Olympic champion Tianna Bartoletta and world champion Brittney Reese.

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