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Kaillie Humphries takes break from bobsled with new focus

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Kaillie Humphries, the only female bobsled driver with multiple Olympic titles, is taking a break this season but plans to return for not only the 2022 Beijing Winter Games but also the 2026 Olympics if they will be in her native Calgary.

“I have been pushing boundaries for 16 consecutive years, and this season I will be stepping away from high performance competition,” was posted on the 33-year-old’s social media.

Humphries cited her engagement last month and her focus on building a strong marriage foundation.

In PyeongChang, Humphries followed her gold medals at Vancouver 2010 and Sochi 2014 with bronze behind surprise German winner Mariama Jamanka and American rival Elana Meyers Taylor.

She also won world championships in 2012 and 2013 and World Cup season titles in 2013, 2014, 2016 and last season.

If Humphries does compete through a fifth Olympics in 2026, she would be older than any previous female Olympic bobsledder. Humphries’ brakewoman in 2010 and 2014, Heather Moyse, holds the current age record at 39.

“I’ve got a lot more to give,” Humphries said before PyeongChang, according to the Canadian Press. “I’m not ready to be done. I don’t think by any means I’ve reached the top.

“What I want to achieve out of sport internally as well as the type of legacy I want to leave is forever changing.”

Calgary is one of three candidates for the 2026 Olympics.

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MORE: Russian bobsledder who tested positive in PyeongChang cleared

Meghan Duggan, U.S. hockey captain, marries longtime Canadian rival

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Meghan Duggan, captain of the Olympic champion U.S. hockey team, wed another gold medalist, Canadian Gillian Apps, on Saturday, according to TeamUSA.org.

Together, they own four Olympic gold medals and 10 world titles.

Duggan, 31, played on the last three Olympic teams and captained the last two.

Duggan and Apps played against each other for several years until Apps retired from the Canadian national team in 2015.

Apps, a 6-foot forward, earned gold medals in 2006, 2010 and 2014 in an undefeated Olympic career. The last two titles came at the expense of the U.S. and Duggan in heated finals.

Apps’ father, Syl Jr., played 10 NHL seasons in the 1970s. Grandfather Syl was a Hockey Hall of Famer, politician and sixth-place finisher in the pole vault at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

Duggan and Apps are not the first U.S.-Canadian hockey couple.

In November 2017, former U.S. captain Julie Chu and Canadian captain Caroline Ouellette, who combined for eight Olympic medals, welcomed baby daughter Liv Chu-Ouellette. They met in 2003 and began dating in 2005.

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MORE: Missy Franklin gets engaged

Steve Nash puts Olympics atop his basketball career after tearful experience

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Steve Nash won two NBA MVPs, played with Dirk Nowitzki, Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant and delivered an 18-year pro career that earned a place in the Basketball Hall of Fame.

Which made what Nash said 14 minutes into his 21-minute induction speech so special.

“The greatest experience of my career was playing the Olympic Games for Canada,” Nash said on Friday night.

It’s no surprise given a memorable story from Nash’s one Olympics, Sydney 2000, the only time Canada has qualified for the Games in the Dream Team era.

Nash had practiced with the national team since age 16, played in the 1994 World Championship at age 19 and was MVP of the 1999 Tournament of the Americas, leading Canada to a silver medal to join the U.S. in the Olympic field.

In Sydney, Nash led a Canadian team that topped its group, upsetting Yugoslavia, then lost in the quarterfinals to eventual silver medalist France by five points. Had it beaten France, Canada would have earned a medal with a win in either of its last two games.

“I feel like I let everyone down,” Nash reportedly said that day. “We could have been in the championship game. We were good enough.”

From the National Post in Canada in 2015:

After the game the fans filtered out to the strains of a haunting, plaintive song by Moby called Porcelain, which had been the soundtrack every post-game of the tournament. I packed and made my way downstairs to the mixed zone – the area where athletes and press are allowed to converge. I reached it just in time to see Nash coming down the tunnel with each of his arms around the shoulders of a teammate.

The teammates – I think it was Rowan Barrett and Sherman Hamilton, but here time has, as I mentioned, faded the details – were literally dragging Nash off the floor. They were because Nash was sobbing so heavily — his chest heaving, the tears streaming, his voice choking – he was unable to walk.

Nash never made it back to the Olympics as a player, but he was an integral part of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games as one of four Canadian athletes chosen to light the indoor cauldron at the Opening Ceremony.

MORE: Coach K on his Rio Olympic wish list, LeBron in 2020

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