Commonwealth Games

Commonwealth Games shooting
Getty Images

Commonwealth Games compromise may put shooting events in India

Leave a comment

The Commonwealth Games may be headed toward a compromise with shooting-sport advocates and the Indian Olympic Association in which shooting events would be held several months and more than 4,000 miles away from the rest of the events.

Organizers in Birmingham, England, which will host the Games from July 27 to Aug. 7, omitted shooting sports from the program, claiming a lack of space. Beach volleyball, para table tennis and women’s cricket have been added.

READ: Women’s cricket added as boycott threat looms

India, which has traditionally done well in Commonwealth Games shooting events, balked at the omission and threatened a boycott. The solution now on the table is to hold the events in India with all events counting toward the Commonwealth Games medal table. India may also host archery, another event that didn’t make the cut for the Games.

“After a year of negotiations between the ISSF and the leadership of the Commonwealth Games Federation, a solution that will finally resolve the issues surrounding the Commonwealth Games 2022 has been found,” the International Shooting Sport Federation announced.

Commonwealth Games organizers released a more cautious but still optimistic statement.

“The proposal will be reviewed and considered in January and February by the CGF and discussed with Birmingham 2022 Delivery Partners,” the Commonwealth Games Federation said. “(W)e would like to thank the CGI (Commonwealth Games India), the NRAI (National Rifle Association of India), the Government of India and the entire sporting community of India for their leadership and significant efforts taken to submit an innovative proposal with the ambition of strengthening Commonwealth Sport.”

India would pay roughly 20 million pounds ($26.24 million) to host the events, The Guardian reported.

The Commonwealth Games program is similar to the Olympic program but omits several traditional events such as water polo, canoe/kayak, equestrian, fencing, soccer, modern pentathlon and rowing. Newer sports such as surfing, sailing and sport climbing also aren’t on the program, while unique Commonwealth sports such as lawn bowls and netball are included.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

Leader collapses near finish of Commonwealth Games marathon

Getty Images
Leave a comment

GOLD COAST, Australia (AP) — One of the most dramatic scenes at the Commonwealth Games came early on the final day.

Callum Hawkins of Scotland was leading the marathon Sunday morning when he became physically distressed and collapsed with about two kilometers remaining (video here). Michael Shelley ran past and defended his title.

Hawkins, who had about a two-minute lead over Shelley, first became disoriented in the humid conditions at about the 38-kilometer mark of the 42.2-kilometer race, briefly holding himself up next to a race barrier to try to regain his balance.

He was able to continue, despite having difficulty running in a straight line, but fell to the road two kilometers later and — after several minutes — received medical attention as Shelley raced past him on the course.

“I wasn’t sure what was going on. I had a couple of mates (in the crowd) who said Callum was in a bit of trouble. They told me to keep going and gave me encouragement,” Shelley said. “I just tried to hang on.”

Hawkins was taken to a nearby hospital by ambulance for testing and Scotland team officials said “there are no major concerns for his welfare at this stage.”

The team passed along a message from Hawkins while the Closing Ceremony was underway, saying “Thanks for all your messages of support today and to the Gold Coast University Hospital staff. I am now feeling much better.”

Television commentators were critical and there was backlash on social media because of the delay getting medical assistance to Hawkins, particularly after a security official tried to move away spectators who were attempting to help the stricken Hawkins.

Shelley finished in 2 hours, 16 minutes and 46 seconds.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

VIDEO: Runner collapses, crawls to finish Hanover Marathon

Australian women break 4x100m freestyle relay world record

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Australia lowered the women’s 4x100m freestyle relay world record for the third time in four years, taking gold at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast on Thursday.

Shayna JackBronte CampbellEmma McKeon and Cate Campbell clocked 3:30.05, bettering their 3:30.65 record from the Rio Olympics.

Cate Campbell, the former individual 100m free world-record holder, anchored in 51.00 seconds, believed to be the fastest split in history. The previous fastest was believed to be Campbell’s 51.59 from the medley relay at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

Campbell had the individual 100m free world record of 52.06 before Swede Sarah Sjöström clocked 51.71 at the 2017 World Championships.

Though Campbell’s split is ineligible for world-record purposes because it was off a relay exchange, it’s still the first 100m free by a woman faster than Mark Spitz‘s fastest-ever individual 100m free (then-world record 51.22 at Munich Olympics; though Spitz was 50.90 on his relay split in Munich).

The Aussie women have a history of great freestyle sprinters but struggled at recent major competitions since winning the 2016 Olympic 4x100m free relay over the U.S. (and ultimately keeping Katie Ledecky from five golds in Rio).

Cate Campbell was fifth and sixth in the 50m and 100m frees in Rio after clocking the fastest 50m free in a textile suit at the Australian Olympic Trials and breaking the 100m free world record one month before the Games. Campbell later said that she swam in Rio with a hernia.

She then skipped the 2017 World Championships because she needed a break to continue on to a possible fourth Olympics in 2020, according to the Australian.

“I’m just making sure I get my body right and my mind right because I do want to continue through to 2018, and at the moment, 2020,’’ she said 13 months ago, according to the newspaper. “I’ve battled injuries pretty much my whole career, and my injuries aren’t just an issue in the swimming pool. I wake up a couple of times every night because I’m sore from my neck and it carries over into day to day life.”

At the 2017 Worlds, sister Bronte and McKeon were seventh and eighth in the 100m free. The last time Australia failed to put a woman in the top six at an Olympics or worlds was 2001.

Also at 2017 Worlds, the Australian women lost the 4x100m free relay by .29 to a U.S. quartet that broke its national record. The U.S., with Katie Ledecky and Simone Manuel, clocked 3:31.72 that day. On Thursday in Gold Coast, Australia went 1.67 seconds faster, benefitting from Campbell’s return.

There are no Olympics or worlds this summer, but the U.S. and Australia should both compete at the Pan Pacific Championships in Tokyo in August.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: ‘I’m getting closer to Ledecky,’ new teen swim star says