Kelly Caitlin
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U.S. cyclist Kelly Caitlin, 23, found dead in her home

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Olympic track cyclist Kelly Catlin, who helped the U.S. women’s pursuit team win the silver medal at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, died Friday at her home in California. She was 23.

USA Cycling chief executive Rob DeMartini said in a statement Sunday that “the entire cycling community is mourning this immense loss. We are offering continuous support to Kelly’s teammates, coaches and staff. We also encourage all those who knew Kelly to support each other through the grieving.”

Catlin’s father, Mark Catlin, told VeloNews that his daughter killed herself.

Catlin was born and raised near Minneapolis, Minnesota, and rose to prominence on the track as a member of the U.S. national team. She also raced on the road for the Rally UHC Pro Cycling Team, and she was pursuing a graduate degree in computational mathematics at Stanford.

After a crash left her paralyzed, Kristina Vogel pushes forward

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As one of the most accomplished track cyclists of her generation, two-time Olympic gold medalist Kristina Vogel has spent much of her life under the lights of a velodrome.

But for a few moments on June 26, 2018, things suddenly went dark.

Vogel, then 27, was training for the team sprint on a concrete track in Cottbus, Germany. Another cyclist was standing on the track, but Vogel, traveling full-speed at about 37 miles per hour, didn’t see him, and they collided.

She can’t remember what happened next.

Vogel woke up on the track and saw her teammates running toward her. She asked one of them to hold her hand. Once her track shoes had been removed, Vogel realized she couldn’t feel her legs.

She was airlifted to a hospital in Berlin and placed in a medically-induced coma. When she awoke, Vogel was told she was paralyzed, though she would still have use of her arms and hands. But the news, she said, wasn’t surprising or even alarming. Vogel said she’d known it almost immediately when she opened her eyes on the track. “As fast as you can, [you] push forward,” she said in a recent phone interview. “[That’s] the thing that I did as a cyclist, day by day.”

Vogel, long a dominant sprinter, has one of her sport’s most impressive resumes: she’s a three-time Olympic medalist (two of them gold) and an 11-time world champion across three events: sprint, Keirin, and team sprint. Born in Kyrgyzstan and raised in Germany, she started cycling as a child, inspired by a poster she saw of E.T. riding a bicycle. After trying road cycling, Vogel switched to track, drawn in by its power and speed. At age 14, she moved away from home to attend sports school, and remembers her mother crying as she left.

Vogel’s promising career was threatened in 2009 when she was struck by a bus while pedaling up a mountain road, leaving her in a coma for two days. But giving up the sport she loved never crossed Vogel’s mind during her recovery. Three years later, she won Olympic gold in the team sprint.

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Vogel remembers agonizing pain in the days that followed last year’s accident. When everything hurt, she willed herself to focus on breathing. Beyond the physical ache was the realization that many of the activities she loved were ones she would no longer be able to do. Her day-to-day life, characterized by speed and intensity, suddenly slowed.

Vogel accepted that the next phase of her life would include the use of a wheelchair, but in those first few weeks especially, she said she missed stretching her legs and walking around.

Her partner, Michael Seidenbecher, a former German track cyclist, spent almost a month beside her bed, leaving only for a few minutes at a time.

“The hardest fights I had, I didn’t fight alone,” she said. “He was always sitting by my side. He gave me so much strength.”

She also received an outpouring of support from the cycling community, fans, and others who heard her story. “I was like, I think I have to fight for them,” Vogel said.

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Eight months after the accident, Vogel is keeping busy: she spends three days a week in physical therapy sessions at the hospital, strengthening her core and upper body. She’s channeled her athleticism into new sports, dabbling in archery, bowling, basketball and canoeing, but hasn’t decided if she wants to return to high-level competition. Vogel also said in a recent interview with CNN she is running for city council in Erfurt, her hometown.

She posts frequently on social media about her progress, showing little snippets of her life each time: smiling after lifting herself off the ground and into sitting position, climbing from her wheelchair into bed, and more recently, dancing. “It surprises me that other people come to me and say, ‘oh my gosh, I couldn’t do that,’” Vogel said. “…but that’s me.”

 

Vogel also savors the quiet moments that life as a top athlete didn’t always permit: “The main thing is to have time, just not to be in a rush,” she said. “I can go for coffee and I can sit there for a while, to not have it in the back of my head to go to training.”

She remains active in the cycling community, continuing to serve as a member of the athletes’ commission for the international cycling federation (UCI). She attended her first competition since the accident when the World Cup circuit came to Berlin in late November. “Weeks or months before, I didn’t know if I’d be fit enough to make it,” she said. But with the steely determination and grit that characterized her career as a cyclist, Vogel completed a lap around the velodrome in her wheelchair to an enthusiastic ovation from the crowd. “I had such a warm welcome,” she said.

She’ll be at the World Championships in Poland, which begin Wednesday, in a different role: as a commentator for the UCI. The event will mark the 10th anniversary of Vogel’s first appearance at Worlds, and she had hoped to win her 12th gold medal there.

Vogel admits she still has her lows, or “black moments,” as she calls them. Sometimes it’s when she’s downstairs at home and realizes she needs something on the second floor. Or occasionally, when kindness seems sparse: during a recent trip to the airport, Vogel and Seidenbecher were trying to get up a flight of stairs, needing one more person to help carry Vogel’s wheelchair. A man breezed by without offering to help. But Vogel says these moments don’t come often – once a week, maybe, or sometimes less frequently than that.

More often, Vogel is cheered by notes and messages from the people she’s inspired. Recently, over dinner with her sister, she was recognized by a woman at the restaurant who told Vogel she had cancer, and “…she knows she can deal with it because I’m dealing with my situation,” Vogel said.

“So the thing I say is that I’m not fighting alone.”

 

Sky to end sponsorship of Team Sky cycling team

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LONDON (AP) — The future of the most successful cycling team of the last decade was put in doubt Wednesday when Sky announced its withdrawal from the sport following the European pay TV giant’s takeover by American company Comcast.

Team Sky, which had a rider win the Tour de France this year for the sixth time in seven races, will compete under a different name from 2020 if new backers can be found, according to Sky.

“The end of 2019 is the right time for us to move on as we open a new chapter in Sky’s story and turn our focus to different initiatives,” Sky group chief executive Jeremy Darroch said.

The team was reliant on 25.3 million pounds ($32 million) in title sponsorship in 2017 from Sky and 21st Century Fox, which had owned the largest stake in the broadcaster.

Philadelphia-based Comcast outbid Fox in September to win control of Sky, which runs television services in Britain, Ireland, Germany, Austria and Italy. Fox, which has a 15 percent stake in Team Sky, is also pulling out of cycling. Sky owns the remaining 85 percent of the team through Tour Racing Ltd.

“While Sky will be moving on at the end of next year, the team is open minded about the future and the potential of working with a new partner, should the right opportunity present itself,” Team Sky general manager Dave Brailsford said.

Team Sky was established in 2009 by Brailsford, the brains behind Britain’s 14 medals in cycling at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, with the target of producing the country’s first Tour de France champion.

Bradley Wiggins won the Tour in 2012 but was later beset by controversies that engulfed the team. A British parliamentary committee said earlier this year that Team Sky crossed “the ethical line” over the use of a therapeutic use exemption to allow Wiggins to take a powerful corticosteroid to prepare for the 2012 Tour. Wiggins and Sky denied wrongdoing.

“The vision for Team Sky began with the ambition to build a clean, winning team around a core of British riders and staff,” Brailsford said. “The team’s success has been the result of the talent, dedication and hard work of a remarkable group of people who have constantly challenged themselves to scale new heights of performance. None of this would have been possible without Sky.”

Only one other team since 2012, Astana with Vincenzo Nibali, has won the Tour de France title as Chris Froome won four times and Geraint Thomas once.

“What they have achieved together would have been beyond the dreams of many just a few years ago,” Darroch said. “We thank you for joining with us on this journey and look forward to enjoying our last season of racing together.”

Brailsford is not looking beyond then, for now.

“I would like to thank all Team Sky riders and staff, past and present — and above all the fans who have supported us on this adventure,” he said. “We aren’t finished yet by any means. There is another exciting year of racing ahead of us and we will be doing everything we can to deliver more Team Sky success in 2019.”

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