Elena Delle Donne

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WADA: Russian hackers publish Simone Biles, U.S. Olympians medical data

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GENEVA (AP) — Confidential medical data of gold medal-winning gymnast Simone Biles, seven-time Grand Slam champion Venus Williams and other female U.S. Olympians was hacked from a World Anti-Doping Agency database and posted online Tuesday.

WADA said the hackers were a “Russian cyber espionage group” called Fancy Bears.

They revealed records of “Therapeutic Use Exemptions” (TUEs), which allow athletes to use otherwise-banned substances because of a verified medical need.

Williams, who won a silver medal in mixed doubles at the Rio Olympics last month, issued a statement via her agent in which she said she was granted TUEs “when serious medical conditions have occurred,” and those exemptions were “reviewed by an anonymous, independent group of doctors, and approved for legitimate medical reasons.”

Williams revealed in 2011 she had been diagnosed with Sjogren’s syndrome, an energy-sapping disease.

“I was disappointed to learn today that my private, medical data has been compromised by hackers and published without my permission,” Williams said. “I have followed the rules established under the Tennis Anti-Doping Program in applying for, and being granted, ‘therapeutic use exemption.'”

Another athlete named was women’s basketball gold medalist Elena Delle Donne, who had thumb surgery on Tuesday and posted a post-op pic on Twitter, along with a statement saying she takes prescribed medication approved by WADA.

In a statement, USA Gymnastics said Biles — who won five medals, four gold, in Rio last month — was approved for an exemption and had not broken any rules.

She wrote on Twitter that she’s taken medication to treat ADHD since she was a child.

“Please know I believe in clean sport, have always followed the rules, and will continue to do so as fair play is critical to sport and is very important to me,” Biles posted.

WADA previously warned of cyberattacks after investigators it had appointed published reports into Russian state-sponsored doping.

“These criminal acts are greatly compromising the effort by the global anti-doping community to re-establish trust in Russia,” World Anti-Doping Agency director general Olivier Niggli said in a statement.

WADA said it “extended its investigation with the relevant law enforcement authorities.”

Last month, hackers obtained a database password for Russian runner Yuliya Stepanova, a whistleblower and key witness for the WADA investigations. She and her husband, a former official with the Russian national anti-doping agency, are now living at an undisclosed location in North America.

A spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin rejected WADA’s statement blaming Russian hackers as unfounded.

“There can be no talk about any official or government involvement, any involvement of Russian agencies in those actions. It’s absolutely out of the question,” spokesman Dmitry Peskov said in a statement carried by Russian news agencies. “Such unfounded accusations don’t befit any organization, if they aren’t backed by substance.”

The International Olympic Committee said it “strongly condemns such methods which clearly aim at tarnishing the reputation of clean athletes.”

“The IOC can confirm however that the athletes mentioned did not violate any anti-doping rules during the Olympic Games Rio 2016,” the Olympic body said.

The top American anti-doping official said it was “unthinkable” to try to smear athletes who followed the rules and did nothing wrong.

“The cyberbullying of innocent athletes being engaged in by these hackers is cowardly and despicable,” said Travis Tygart, CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

The name “Fancy Bears” appears to be a tongue-in-cheek reference to a collection of hackers that many security researchers have long associated with Russia.

In a statement posted to its website early Tuesday, the group proclaimed its allegiance to Anonymous, the loose-knit movement of online mischief-makers, and said it hacked WADA to show the world “how Olympic medals are won.”

“We will start with the U.S. team which has disgraced its name by tainted victories,” the group said, adding that more revelations about other teams were forthcoming.

Internet records suggest Fancy Bears’ data dump has been in the works for at least two weeks; their website was registered on Sept. 1 and their Twitter account was created on Sept. 6.

Messages left with the group were not immediately returned. A French name and phone number associated with the site both appeared to be bogus. A mailing address listed by the hackers appeared to point to a florist east of Paris; messages left with the business were not immediately returned.

MORE: Russia loses 2 more Olympic track and field medals for doping

Star Olympians continue to highlight ESPN’s Body Issue

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ESPN the Magazine announced Tuesday a roster of 19 athletes for this year’s Body Issue, and 10 are Olympians. That’s the most Olympic athletes since 2012.

The list likely will grow to 11 with the coming announcement of the U.S. Olympic women’s soccer team, as World Cup veteran Christen Press will appear in the magazine. Paratriathlete Allysa Seely is also on ESPN’s roster, and she is set to make her Paralympic debut as her sport is included in the Games for the first time.

The Body Issue will appear online July 6 and hit newsstands two days later. It will be highlighted by basketball star Dwyane Wade, who competed in the 2004 and 2008 Games. He’d been asked to pose for the issue before, but finally agreed after seven years.

“It’s bigger than me showing my body off,” Wade said. “That’s not as important to me as telling a story of overcoming a fear. It hopefully gives someone confidence to really be their authentic self.”

Also from the basketball court will be Elena Delle Donne, who will make her Olympic debut in Rio this summer. Wrestler Adeline Gray will also appear in the magazine before making her Olympic debut.

Baseball will be represented by Jake Arrieta, who pitched and won bronze for Team USA at the 2008 Beijing Games, the sport’s last appearance in the Olympics.

Other current Olympians appearing in the Body Issue will be swimmer Nathan Adrian (three-time medalist from 2008 and ’12 Games), steeplechase runner Emma Coburn (2012 Olympics), fencer Nzingha Prescod (2012 Olympics), beach volleyball player April Ross (silver medalist in 2012), and boxer Claressa Shields (gold medalist in 2012).

Retired diver Greg Louganis will also appear as the issue’s oldest athlete. The 56-year-old won a silver medal in 1976, and then two gold medals at each of the 1984 and ’88 Olympics.

MORE: Olympians in 2015 Body Issue | 2014 Body Issue | 2013 Body Issue

Elena Delle Donne nervous as Olympic tryout camp opens

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STORRS, Conn. (AP) — It’s not often that Elena Delle Donne is nervous on the basketball court.

Still for one of the rare times in her life, it’s not a sure thing that the reigning WNBA MVP will make a team. Delle Donne is hoping to play in her first Olympics this summer for the U.S. national team in Rio.

“All my family memories and friends were texting me, do your best out there, be confident,” Delle Donne said. “They take the best 12 players that play together. It’s not going to be the best 12 players in the world. That’s the key. Try and make everyone else around me better.”

Delle Donne remembered the last time she had this nervous feeling and that was also in a USA Basketball tryout when she was trying to make the World University games team when she was in college.

She did and that team went on to win a gold medal. While making that roster was tough, making this one for the Olympics will be extremely challenging because of the wealth of talent on the team.

“With no disrespect to the former teams, it’s going to be clearly the most difficult team to come up with,” national team director Carol Callan said. “Typically you look at the top eight or nine and then build out with what you need. It’s going to be hard to say who those are because there are 15 of them.”

Three-time Olympic gold medalists Diana Taurasi, Sue Bird and Tamika Catchings lead the way while Candace Parker, Sylvia Fowles and Seimone Augustus each have won two. In all, 10 of the finalists have already won Olympic gold for the U.S. That doesn’t even include Delle Donne or Brittney Griner or UConn senior Breanna Stewart.

“They’ve gone to battle with you,” Callan said. “They’ve sacrificed, come to training camp with you. There’s not a real reason to say that you’re not on the team other than there are so many people to choose from. It’s a lot easier when they are younger and never been there.”

Parker and Fowles as well as Tina Charles were excused from camp as they were playing in the Chinese league playoffs. Charles’ team just eliminated Parker’s team.

The three days will serve as the last chance for the players to impress the selection committee before the team is announced this spring. The U.S. has 41 straight Olympic victories since winning the bronze medal in 1992.

“There were years where you’d say ‘who’s the No. 12 man’,” coach Geno Auriemma said. “Now, maybe there’s six-seven-eight players for two spots if you take all the previous Olympians and they all deserve to be on the team. That’s a good problem to have. A lot of other countries wish they had that problem.”

The three days are a rare opportunity for the U.S. team to train in February because most players are competing overseas in Russia, Turkey or other countries. With FIBA’s recent changes in World Championship qualifying procedures, there are now breaks in European club play so national teams can train and compete in  qualifying system.

The camp also came during the middle of UConn’s season. Auriemma’s team has won 63 consecutive games and plays again on Wednesday. Stewart is doing double-duty the next few days going to both practices.

MORE: Sue Bird looks ahead to ‘likely last Olympics’