Getty Images

Alistair Brownlee ’50-50′ on trying for third Olympic triathlon title

Leave a comment

Alistair Brownlee‘s chances of trying for a third straight Olympic triathlon title in two years amount to a coin flip.

“Tokyo is 50-50 at the moment,” the Brit Brownlee said, according to the Press Association. “Going into next year I’m going to start deciding whether to look at the Olympics, or whether I’m going to focus on doing the longer stuff over the next 18 months.

“The full Ironman is potentially not too far away. It depends on the decision I make going into next year.”

Brownlee will contest just his second Olympic-distance triathlon since September 2016 at the European Championships in Glasgow on Friday. Then he will turn his focus back to longer distances with a 140.6-mile Ironman, nearly four times the Olympic distance, not out of the question.

He is expected to compete in the half Ironman world championships in South Africa next month.

The 2008 Olympic triathlon champion Jan Frodeno of Germany transitioned to Ironman, winning two 140.6 world titles. One of Brownlee’s biggest rivals in Olympic distance-racing, Spaniard Javier Gómez, is a two-time half Ironman world champion.

“All triathletes have the ambition to do the almost mystical Ironman World Championships in Hawaii,” Brownlee said in 2016, according to the BBC. “It’s very unlikely that I could do it in the next two years, but I could build up my endurance then maybe go back to it after Tokyo as a 32-year-old.”

It’s still a possibility, even though Brownlee has been set back by hip surgery and a calf injury in the last year. He won lower-level half Ironmans in Utah in May 2017 and Dubai six months ago, then placed 10th in the Commonwealth Games sprint-distance triathlon in April. He won another Ironman 70.3 in China the following week.

Brownlee was due to return to the ITU World Series circuit for Olympic hopefuls in June but withdrew before a race in Leeds, citing “a few niggles.”

MORE: Tokyo 2020 triathlon to start early to beat the heat

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

Adam Peaty’s world record corrected after timing error

Getty Images
Leave a comment

GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — Add a full tenth of a second to Adam Peaty’s latest world record time — and it is still a world record.

On Sunday, the British swimmer was in the unusual situation of having his best mark in the 100m breaststroke at the European Championships corrected to 57.10 seconds from the 57.00 time shown at Saturday’s race.

The European aquatics federation (LEN) said there was “a problem with the race timing equipment” during the first nine races of Saturday’s afternoon session, which included the 100m breast final where Olympic champion Peaty improved his own previous best mark of 57.13 from the Rio Games.

“The starting mechanism had been incorrectly configured prior to the start of the session which resulted in all reported times being 0.10s faster due to a configuration delay of 0.10s,” LEN said in a statement.

The federation added it worked with the timing system operators and “carried out extensive tests to confirm this system configuration error” and it has “revised all recorded times for the first nine races during that session.”

Also, LEN confirmed that all times from earlier sessions and after the ninth race of the session in question were accurate.

The other world record in the same session an hour later, by Russian swimmer Kliment Kolesnikov in the 50m backstroke, remained unaffected and was confirmed at 24.00.

Chris Spice, British Swimming’s national performance director, said in a statement that “we support LEN’s vigilance in this matter and appreciate the time they have taken to make sure all times are correct.

“We want this event to be remembered for the amazing achievements of the athletes so it is important that the results are correct,” Spice said. “We don’t want this to take away from Adam’s amazing performance which we all experienced in a fantastic arena.”

Although there was no immediate doubt about the timing after Saturday’s race, Peaty’s reaction time at the start was measured at an extraordinary 0.47, which has now been corrected to 0.57.

It was the 10th world record for the 23-year-old Peaty, who has the 14 fastest times in the discipline and is the only swimmer to beat the 58-second mark.

Last autumn he announced “Project 56,” his ambition to go under 57 as well.

Peaty, who is a five-time world champion, can win his 10th European long-course title in the 50m breaststroke on Wednesday.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Chase Kalisz, among Floyd, swim stardom, Waffle House, at home in Athens

Adam Peaty breaks 100m breaststroke world record again

Getty Images
Leave a comment

GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — By improving his own world record in the 100m breaststroke again, Olympic champion Adam Peaty is within one-hundredth of a second of completing his “Project 56.”

The British swimmer won gold in 57.00 seconds at the European Championships on Saturday, shaving 0.13 off his previous best mark, which he swam at the Rio de Janeiro Games two years ago.

Peaty, who has the 14 fastest times in the discipline, is the only swimmer to beat the 58-second mark, and last autumn he announced his ambition to go under 57 as well.

“I don’t want to just win, I want to dominate. And that’s not an arrogant side, that’s the competitive side in me,” he said on Saturday.

With a reaction time at the start of just 0.47, Peaty looked sharp from the beginning of the race. He never had his lead under threat. He beat James Wilby by 1.54 for a British 1-2 finish. Anton Chupkov of Russia finished 1.96 behind in third.

“It’s a weird one because I wasn’t going after a world record. But after the heat yesterday I knew I was in good shape,” said Peaty, who was still far from a world record in that heat (57.89) and in the semifinals (58.04), but he announced he “would be on my full game” for the final.

“After the semi I was back in the 58s but it just shows what you can do if you have a positive mental attitude,” he said.

It’s Peaty’s ninth European long-course title, to add to his five world titles.

In the buildup, Peaty said he wasn’t focusing on setting world records or below-57 finishing times anymore after his disappointing showing at the Commonwealth Games.

On the Gold Coast in April, he won the 100m breaststroke in only 58.84, and suffered a first defeat since 2014 in the 50m breaststroke, where he was edged by South Africa’s Cameron van der Burgh.

“When you go four years without losing, you kind of get complacent even if you don’t want to admit it to yourself,” he said, adding that a “spider web of support” — his girlfriend, family, and coaches — helped him to rediscover his joy in the sport.

“It’s not just my victory tonight. It’s their victory as well. I didn’t train too hard these last months. I got the balance right between training smart and training very hard.”

Just missing out on a time below 57 didn’t bother him.

“No, that gives me another level of motivation,” he said. “If I’d achieved that, people would be talking about ‘Project 55.’”

An hour after Peaty’s achievement, Kliment Kolesnikov set a world record in the 50m backstroke final. The Russian finished in 24 seconds to beat the previous best mark set by Britain’s Liam Tancock, who timed 24.04 at the 2009 World Championships in Rome.

Robert-Andrei Glinta of Romania won silver after trailing Kolesnikov by 0.55, and Shane Ryan of Ireland finished 0.64 behind for bronze.

It’s the 18-year-old Kolesnikov’s second gold medal of the European Championships after winning the 4x100m freestyle with the Russian team on Friday. He also won four European titles at the short-course championships in Copenhagen last year.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Chase Kalisz, among Floyd, swim stardom, Waffle House, at home in Athens