Jack Eichel

Patrick Kane, Auston Matthews
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Who makes the 2022 U.S. Olympic men’s hockey roster?

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NBC Sports NHL analyst Pierre McGuire‘s early U.S. Olympic roster prediction for the 2022 Beijing Winter Games, now that the NHL and NHLPA are one step closer to participating after skipping PyeongChang 2018 …

Goalies
Ben Bishop (Dallas Stars, 33)
John Gibson (Anaheim Ducks, 26)
Connor Hellebuyck (Winnipeg Jets, 27)
Also in the hunt: Spencer Knight (Boston College, 19)

OlympicTalk notes: All of these men would be Olympic rookies. Knight would be the youngest U.S. Olympic male hockey player in the NHL era, breaking defenseman Bryan Berard‘s record from 1998. If the U.S. wants some Olympic experience on the team, it could look at 2014 starter Jonathan Quick, who is still the Los Angeles Kings’ No. 1 but has battled injuries since Sochi.

Defensemen
John Carlson (Washington Capitals, 30)
Quinn Hughes (Vancouver Canucks, 20)
Seth Jones (Columbus Blue Jackets, 25)
Torey Krug (Boston Bruins, 29)
Charlie McAvoy (Boston Bruins, 22)
Ryan McDonagh (Tampa Bay Lightning, 31)
Jaccob Slavin (Carolina Hurricanes, 26)
Zach Werenski (Columbus Blue Jackets, 22)
Also in the hunt: Brandon Carlo (Boston Bruins, 23), Adam Fox (New York Rangers, 22), Ryan Suter (Minnesota Wild, 35), Jacob Trouba (New York Rangers, 26)

OlympicTalk notes: Carlson, McDonagh and Suter have Olympic experience. Carlson was the lone U.S. defenseman in the top seven of NHL All-Star voting at the end of the 2018-19 season. Carlson, Jones, Slavin and Hughes were in the 2020 All-Star Game.

MORE: Who makes the 2022 Canada Olympic men’s hockey roster?

Forwards
Brock Boeser (Vancouver Canucks, 23)
Kyle Connor (Winnipeg Jets, 23)
Jack Eichel (Buffalo Sabres, 23)
Johnny Gaudreau (Calgary Flames, 26)
Jake Guentzel (Pittsburgh Penguins, 25)
Patrick Kane (Chicago Blackhawks, 31)
Chris Kreider (New York Rangers, 29)
Dylan Larkin (Detroit Red Wings, 23)
Auston Matthews (Toronto Maple Leafs, 22)
J.T. Miller (Vancouver Canucks, 27)
Max Pacioretty (Vegas Golden Knights, 31)
Brady Tkachuk (Ottawa Senators, 20)
Matt Tkachuk (Calgary Flames, 22)
Blake Wheeler (Winnipeg Jets, 33)
Also in the hunt: Alex DeBrincat (Chicago Blackhawks, 22), Anders Lee (New York Islanders, 30), T.J. Oshie (Washington Capitals, 33), Bryan Rust (Pittsburgh Penguins, 28)

OlympicTalk notes: Kane, Wheeler, Pacioretty and Oshie have Olympic experience, but the top lines will be filled with Olympic rookies. No American forwards were in the top 11 of NHL All-Star voting at the end of the 2018-19 season, but Kane, Matthews and Eichel ranked Nos. 8, 9 an 10 in points this season.

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As NHL stars react to Olympics, who will follow Alex Ovechkin’s lead?

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NHL stars expressed disappointment, of course, after the NHL announced it would not participate in the PyeongChang Olympics, but an important question remains largely unanswered.

Who will follow Alex Ovechkin‘s lead and declare they intend to defy the NHL and play in the Olympics anyway?

Capitals teammate and U.S. Olympic star T.J. Oshie would not answer that question Tuesday.

“When it comes down to it, I’ll make a decision about that, but as of right now, I’m staying positive, hoping we can figure something out,” Oshie said, according to ESPN.com.

Sidney Crosby won’t say, either. Nor will Connor McDavid.

Star Swedish defenseman Erik Karlsson of the Ottawa Senators declined to answer the question Monday, according to Postmedia News in Canada, but still criticized the NHL.

“Crap, pretty much,” Karlsson said of the NHL decision, according to the report. “I don’t understand the decision. It’s very unfortunate for the game of hockey around the world that they’re going to do this to the sport. I think it’s going to hurt a lot if we don’t end up going.

“Whoever made that decision obviously has no idea what they’re doing.”

Tampa Bay Lightning forward Steven Stamkos is also taking a wait-and-see approach. Stamkos memorably missed the Sochi Olympics due to a fractured right tibia.

“Yeah, you can certainly have that attitude [of going to the Olympics anyway], but we don’t know exactly what the rules and regulations will be regarding that topic,” he said, according to ESPN.com. “Until you know that, you can make an informed decision at that time. Personally, there’s some time here to maybe let things settle down a little bit and reflect. Hopefully, something can change their mind.”

Blackhawks stars Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews both said they would not leave the NHL club midseason to play in the Olympics, according to Chicago media.

Likewise, Capitals goalie Braden Holtby said he will not push for a Canadian Olympic team spot if the NHL’s decision is final.

“I wouldn’t be able to go away from my team here,” Holtby said. “I couldn’t do it. That’s just personal. Everyone’s priorities are kind of different.”

Another star Russian forward, Vladimir Tarasenko of the St. Louis Blues, reportedly said he would think about the situation in the summer.

The Montreal Canadiens’ Carey Price, the No. 1 goalie for Canada’s gold-medal team in Sochi, wasn’t convinced the NHL’s decision was final.

“I think there’s maybe a little bit of tactics involved,” he said. “We’ll see. The Olympics aren’t here yet.”

Henrik Lundqvist, who backstopped Sweden to gold at the 2006 Torino Olympics, was one of the first stars to comment, doing so via Twitter:

“Disappointing news, NHL won’t be part of the Olympics 2018. A huge opportunity to market the game at the biggest stage is wasted,” he said. “But most of all, disappointing for all the players that can’t be part of the most special adventure in sports.”

The most tenured active Swede, four-time Olympian Henrik Zetterberg, said the NHL “probably wants something from” the NHL players, “as always,” likely referring to a bargaining chip.

Auston Matthews, who was in line to become the youngest U.S. Olympics men’s hockey player since 1992, dismissed a question about the NHL decision but said he would have wanted to go to PyeongChang.

Buffalo Sabres leading scorer Jack Eichel echoed the disappointment sentiment.

“Obviously, as a league, we’re trying to grow our game all over the world,” he said. “I think the Olympics is a good way to do it. … To be able to play the game in other continents, other places, and allow them to see how exciting and the type of game we play, I think it’s a good opportunity.”

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MORE: 2018 Olympic hockey groups set

Jack Eichel’s overtime winner lifts U.S. over Slovakia to top group (video)

Jack Eichel
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NCAA Player of the Year Jack Eichel scored with 28 seconds left in overtime to lift the U.S. over Slovakia 5-4 to top its group at the World Hockey Championship in Ostrava, Czech Republic, on Tuesday.

Eichel, 18 and in his first senior World Championship, and the U.S. advanced to play Switzerland in the quarterfinals Thursday. The youngest U.S. team member’s goal guaranteed the U.S. will not face the other group winner, two-time reigning Olympic champion Canada, until a potential gold-medal game or bronze-medal game.

NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra will have coverage of quarterfinal games (schedule here). The U.S.-Switzerland winner will face the winner of Sweden-Russia/Finland in the semifinals Saturday.

Switzerland, fourth in its group, is without stalwart Calgary Flames goalie Jonas Hiller at Worlds. Switzerland was in the last four Olympic hockey tournaments, never advancing past the quarterfinals. The U.S. beat Switzerland 3-2 in group play at last year’s World Championship.

On Tuesday, the U.S. also tallied goals from Ben Smith, Seth Jones, Anders Lee and Charlie Coyle, though it squandered a 3-0 lead.

The U.S. has won three Worlds medals (all bronze) since 1962 and reached the quarterfinals for a fifth straight year. It went 6-1 in group play with one Olympian on its roster — defenseman Justin Faulk.

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