Jake Wightman

Faith Kipyegon just misses world record; Noah Lyles wins 200m showdown in Monaco

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Kenyan Faith Kipyegon ran the second-fastest women’s 1500m in history, while Noah Lyles won a men’s 200m showdown with the ninth-best time ever at a Diamond League meet in Monaco on Wednesday.

Kipyegon ran 3:50.37 to miss Ethiopian Genzebe Dibaba‘s world record by three tenths of a second.

“I have been chasing the time for quite some time, but I am happy with the personal best,” Kipyegon said, according to organizers. “It seems I did not give all, but I tried hard. I knew this was the best place to get the world record, but I am so disappointed I lost it in the last meters. I hope for the best next time.”

Kipyegon, a 28-year-old mom, owns two Olympic 1500m gold medals and two world 1500m titles. She ran by herself for the last 600 meters after pacers shed, aided by lights along the track showing her the world record pace.

They went out 2.86 seconds faster at 800 meters than Dibaba’s pacers did for her world record in Monaco in 2015. Over the next lap, Kipyegon fell 11 hundredths behind Dibaba’s pace going into the last 300 meters.

Later, Lyles claimed the men’s 200m in 19.46 seconds, his second-best time after his 19.31 American record from last month’s world championships. Lyles distanced 18-year-old world bronze medalist Erriyon Knighton (19.84) and world 400m champion Michael Norman (19.95), cementing his status as the clear current 200m king. He became the first man to break 19.50 twice in one year.

Full Monaco results are here. The Diamond League returns after a break for the European Championships for the season’s last three meets, starting in Lausanne, Switzerland, on Aug. 26.

Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce won the women’s 100m in 10.62 seconds, matching the sixth-best time in history. Fraser-Pryce, a 35-year-old with seven combined Olympic and world 100m titles, has broken 10.70 seconds eight times in her career, all in the last two years after returning from 2017 childbirth. Six of those times came since May 7, and three of them came in the last five days.

Countrywoman Shericka Jackson, the world 200m champion, was second in 10.71, a personal best by .02 to become the sixth-fastest woman in history. Marie-Josee Ta Lou of Cote d’Ivoire was third in 10.72, taking .06 off the African record.

Two-time world champion Grant Holloway won the 110m hurdles in 12.99 seconds, edging world silver medalist Trey Cunningham by four hundredths. Holloway ran the second-fastest time in the world this year behind Devon Allen‘s 12.84. Allen wasn’t in Monaco as he’s at Philadelphia Eagles training camp, bidding to make the team at wide receiver.

Venezuelan Yulimar Rojas won a women’s triple jump that included the top six from worlds. Rojas, the Olympic and world champion and world record holder, moved from last to first with a 15.01-meter leap in the fifth of six rounds.

Australian Kelsey-Lee Barber won a battle among the world championships medalists in the women’s javelin. Barber, the gold medalist, threw 64.50 meters. Japan’s Haruka Kitaguchi, the bronze medalist, took second, while American Kara Winger, the silver medalist, was fourth.

Surprise world 1500m champion Jake Wightman of Great Britain ran down Canadian Marco Arop to win the men’s 1000m in 2:13.88. Kenyan Emmanuel Korir, the Olympic and world 800m champion, finished last in the rarely contested distance.

Burundi’s Thierry Ndikumwenayo ran the third-fastest 3000m in history, catching Ethiopian Berihu Aregawi. The 3000m is not on the Olympic or world championships program. Grant Fisher ran an American record 7:28.48, taking .52 off Bernard Lagat‘s American record.

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Norwegian kings dethroned and a dad calls his son’s upset at track worlds

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In Norway, the newspaper headline translated to “Hunting Two Gold Tonight.” Neither Karsten Warholm nor Jakob Ingebrigtsen delivered.

Brazilian Alison dos Santos dethroned Warholm in the 400m hurdles at the world track and field championships in Eugene, Oregon, on Tuesday night. Warholm, who in Tokyo shattered his world record to bring it down to 45.94 seconds, led at 250 meters but faded to seventh place at his first meet since suffering a hamstring tear June 5.

Brit Jake Wightman recorded the biggest shock at the halfway point of the 10-day worlds, beating the Olympic 1500m gold medalist Ingebrigtsen. He did so while his dad, Geoff, provided race commentary on the stadium public address system.

Dos Santos, who took bronze in Tokyo to become the third-fastest man in history, prevailed in 46.29 seconds, the third-fastest time in history.

It wasn’t much of an upset, given dos Santos came into worlds as the fastest man this year. But Warholm had not lost a 400m hurdles that he finished since his last race of 2018.

“Maybe being out for six weeks probably cost me a little bit,” Warholm said on the BBC. “I tried with everything I had. … Once that lactic hits you, there’s no going back.”

TRACK WORLDS: Broadcast Schedule | Results | U.S. Roster | Key Events

American Rai Benjamin took silver, a much happier silver than last year, when he ran faster than the previous world record at the Olympics.

“[Today] was probably the hardest race I ever ran,” said Benjamin, who due to COVID-19 and hamstring tendonitis did not clear a hurdle from May 14 until just before the USATF Outdoor Championships first round June 24. “I [thought I] might tear this tendon off the bone, so I just left it alone and kind of cruised in for second.”

Another American, Trevor Bassitt, the NCAA Division II champion from Ashland University, earned bronze. Tuesday would have been the 63rd birthday of his former coach, four-time Olympic hammer thrower Jud Logan, who died in January from COVID-related pneumonia.

On Monday, Bassitt tweeted a screenshot of a text conversation he had with Logan last Aug. 2, the day of the Olympic 400m hurdles final. Logan predicted that Bassitt would make the world championships final in Eugene.

“I could feel that something special was going to happen today,” said Bassitt, who was eighth at Olympic Trials, then this year lowered his personal best three times, from 48.80 to 47.39 on Tuesday. “I just know he was with me for that whole race.”

Earlier in the 1500m, Wightman overtook Ingebrigtsen at 1,300 meters and relegated the Norwegian to silver.

“When you’re in an event like that, and there’s a figure and an athlete who’s so dominant and such a heavy favorite that I never, ever expected to be world champion,” said Wightman, who was fifth at the last worlds in 2019 and 10th in Tokyo. “I believed that there was a chance, but my main thing is I wanted to come in here and make amends from a shocking run in Tokyo and come away with a run I was proud of and that was hopefully going to be a medal.”

Up in the Hayward Field stands, Geoff described his son’s gutsy move to the front and ability to hold off Ingebrigtsen for the thousands in attendance.

“That’s my son,” Geoff said on the PA, according to journalist Cathal Dennehy on site, “and he’s the world champion.”

Ingebrigtsen followed his Olympic title by last month running the world’s fastest mile since 2001 and has had designs on going for a 1500m-5000m double at the 2024 Olympics, should organizers separate the events on the schedule.

“I’m embarrassed being this good, but also this bad,” he said. “I know that I’m better than silver.”

Worlds continue Wednesday featuring finals in the women’s 3000m steeplechase and women’s discus.

Australian Eleanor Patterson won the women’s high jump over Ukainian Yaroslava Mahuchikh. Both cleared 2.02 meters, and Patterson won on count back. Russian Mariya Lasitskene won the last world title in 2019 and the Olympic title in 2021 by clearing 2.04. Lasitskene was barred from worlds due to the ban on Russians for the war in Ukraine. On Her Turf has more on the women’s high jump.

Slovenian Kristjan Ceh won the men’s discus with a championship record 71.13-meter throw. Lithuanian Mykolas Alekna, a rising Cal sophomore, became the first teenage man to win a throwing medal in world championships history, according to Bill Mallon of Olympedia.org. The reigning Olympic and world champion Daniel Stahl of Sweden was fourth.

In non-finals Tuesday, Fred Kerley was eliminated in the 200m semifinals with a sixth-place finish, three days after leading a U.S. sweep of the 100m. Kerley said he suffered a left leg cramp and that he would be OK moving forward with the 4x100m relay final coming Saturday.

The other three Americans were the top qualifiers into Thursday’s final — 2019 World champion Noah Lyles (19.62), 18-year-old phenom Erriyon Knighton (19.77) and Olympic silver medalist Kenny Bednarek (19.84).

The Jamaicans who swept the women’s 100m — Shelly-Ann Fraser-PryceShericka Jackson and Elaine Thompson-Herah — made Thursday’s 200m final, led by Jackson’s 21.67.

In the women’s 400m hurdles, heat winners included Olympic gold medalist and world record holder Sydney McLaughlin (53.95) and Olympic gold medalist and former world record holder Dalilah Muhammad (54.45). Semifinals are Wednesday.

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Jenny Simpson, Jake Wightman win Fifth Avenue Mile titles

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Jenny Simpson won her sixth straight Fifth Avenue Mile, while Brit Jake Wightman took his first title in the men’s race in a rainy New York City on Sunday.

Simpson, the Olympic bronze medalist and 2011 World champion at 1500m, extended her record to seven overall titles.

She clocked 4:18.9 on the wet road along Central Park, edging U.S. Olympic steeplechaser Colleen Quigley by three tenths. Emma Coburn, the world champion in the 3000m steeple, was fourth in 4:20.5.

“It’s kind of slick, so I wanted to play into that apprehension and take it out hard and say, if you want to run this race, you’ve got to come with me,” Simpson told Lewis Johnson on NBC. “We’re going to risk it all, life and limb.

“Colleen was a really formidable opponent today. I saved a little for her.”

Wightman, a 24-year-old who was 20th in the 1500m at the 2017 Worlds, held off four-time Fifth Avenue Mile winner Nick Willis of New Zealand. Wightman hit the tape in 3:53.6, six tenths ahead of Willis.

Olympic 1500m champion Matthew Centrowitz, who missed a week or two of training in August with a calf strain, finished 16th.

Correction: An earlier version of this post incorrectly listed Centrowitz finishing 12th.

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