Jamaica

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Elaine Thompson, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce sizzle at Jamaican Championships

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Jamaica’s Olympic sprint queens Elaine Thompson and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce showed Friday that they aren’t ceding the 100m throne to breakout American teen Sha’Carri Richardson.

Thompson, who turns 27 next Friday, and Fraser-Pryce, 32, went one-two at Jamaica’s world championships trials, as many expected.

Somewhat more catching were their identical times — 10.73 seconds to wrestle the 2019 world No. 1 ranking from Richardson.

Two weeks ago, the 19-year-old Richardson entered the all-time top 10 by winning the NCAA Championships in 10.75 seconds, the fastest time ever for a teenager. She then turned professional, setting her Diamond League debut for the Pre Classic on June 30, with Fraser-Pryce also in that field (live on NBC Sports).

Thompson, who swept the Rio Olympic 100m and 200m, consolidated her favorite status for the world championships in Doha in September. After going winless internationally in 2018, she has now won her last two starts with her two fastest times since August 2017.

“I’ve been battling with Achilles injury, and it’s been a tough season so to come out here and retain my national title means a lot to me as I’m not 100 percent,”  a tearful Thompson said, according to Reuters.

Fraser-Pryce, the 2008 and 2012 Olympic 100m champ, clocked her fastest time in nearly six years and since Aug. 7, 2017, childbirth. Nobody has run that fast at 32 years or older. She broke Russian Irina Privalova‘s record as the fastest mom in history.

“To be honest I’m defying odds,” she said, according to Reuters.

Also notable was third-place finisher Briana Williams, who clocked 10.94 seconds at age 17 with a fever, the fastest time ever for somebody that young.

In the men’s 100m, 2012 Olympic silver medalist Yohan Blake won in 9.96 seconds, ranking him sixth in the world this year. Former world-record holder Asafa Powell, now 36, did not start his semifinal.

MORE: Caster Semenya allowed to race 800m at Pre Classic

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Jamaican Olympic bobsledder’s provisional suspension lifted

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Jazmine Fenlator-Victorian, who in PyeongChang drove the first Jamaican Olympic women’s bobsled, had a provisional suspension lifted last month by the International Bobsled Federation over a pre-Olympics drug test.

Jamaica’s bobsled federation confirmed a Jamaica Gleaner report that Fenlator-Victorian was provisionally banned shortly after PyeongChang and reinstated March 9. The IBSF and Fenlator-Victorian have not responded to requests for comment.

Fenlator-Victorian reportedly tested positive for a small amount of the banned substance clenbuterol before the 2018 Olympics.

Jamaica Bobsled said it was notified after the Games of the provisional suspension and that Fenlator-Victorian was not trying to gain an advantage, given the small amount and that a later pre-Olympic test came back clean. Many athletes have been cleared after testing positive for small amounts of clenbuterol, including Jamaican sprinters.

Fenlator-Victorian did not race in the 2018-19 season, according to her IBSF profile.

Fenlator-Victorian and former sprinter Carrie Russell finished 19th of 20 sleds in PyeongChang. Fenlator-Victorian, 33, also finished 11th at the Sochi Olympics competing for the U.S., then switched representation to her father’s native country.

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Usain Bolt sets deadline on continuing soccer career

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Usain Bolt said he will decide by the end of November whether to sign with a new soccer team or end his pursuit of the sport altogether.

“I got a lot of offers from different clubs,” Bolt said in a video interview in London on Wednesday. “Now we’re just trying to figure out what. We’ll make a decision before the end of November if I’m going to go to another club, or if I’m just going to call that dream quits.”

Bolt refused to specify where the offers are from in an Associated Press interview.

The eight-time Olympic champion practiced with teams in five countries since retiring from track and field last year but hasn’t signed a professional contract. His latest and most prolonged training stint was with the Central Coast Mariners of Australia’s top league.

Bolt trained and played preseason exhibitions with the club on a tryout deal from August to October.

The Mariners announced on Nov. 2 that they would not sign Bolt after failed negotiations, unable to bridge the financial gap for a player they did “not have the luxury” to play in regular-season matches.

Bolt thanked the Mariners staff, players and fans in a statement.

“For making me feel so welcome during my time there. I wish the club success for the season ahead,” Bolt said two weeks ago.

Bolt said in the summer that he turned down offers from teams in France and Spain, but not in the top division. He preferred Australia, where he didn’t have to learn a language. His long-time dream has been to play for Manchester United.

“I’ve talked to [Premier League stars Paul] Pogba and all these guys, [Raheem] Sterling, all these guys, and they are happy to see that I’m trying, ‘Come on, you can do it,'” Bolt said in a recent Sky Sports interview. “This is not about all about the money. This is a dream, and I want to try and see how good I can be.”

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