jimmie johnson

Jimmie Johnson just misses Boston Marathon goal, eyes return

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BOSTON — When Jimmie Johnson arrived in Boston for his first marathon, running less than two days after Saturday’s 400-mile NASCAR race, one of Meb Keflezighi‘s books was waiting in his hotel room, signed by the 2014 Boston Marathon champion himself.

When Johnson finished his first marathon in 3 hours, 9 minutes, 7 seconds on Monday, there was Keflezighi again. This time to present the seven-time NASCAR Cup champion his finisher’s medal.

“He congratulated me, was impressed with my time for a first-time marathoner,” said Johnson, who got into Boston via a Gatorade sponsor’s exemption but has run a 1:33 half marathon. “I invited [Keflezighi] to a car race, would love to connect with him and host him and show him what our world’s like at the race track.”

Johnson may be seeing Keflezighi again next year. The 43-year-old noted his time beat the 2020 Boston Marathon qualifying standard by 53 seconds for his age group.

“I would love to be able to try to break three [hours],” Johnson said 45 minutes after crossing the Boylston Street finish line, repeating his pre-race goal time. “I know for a fact it wasn’t in the cards today. I left on that number and was trying to hold it and just didn’t have it. I need to go back to the drawing board. I love that kind of challenge, and it’s going to weigh on me. … I just need to look at the schedule and see if it all lays out, and I can come back.”

Johnson said the transition from Saturday’s NASCAR race in Richmond, where he placed 12th, to the world’s oldest annual marathon was smooth. He felt strong on the starting line, though admitting the buzz of the Hopkinton start drained some energy.

“I couldn’t believe how many people did spot me,” he said. “It was loud, especially the closer we got to town. Once somebody would recognize me, the crowd would get going, and I could kind of egg them on.”

Johnson, wearing bib 4848 to correspond to his No. 48 Chevrolet, did get bragging rights over former NASCAR driver Jamie McMurray, who ran a 3:14 marathon in December.

“It’s always been of interest to me, endurance sports,” Johnson told NBC Sports before the race. “The year of the bombings, I realized that if the NASCAR schedule is right, with the marathon on a Monday, it’s something I can do. It just took from the year of the bombings until now for the opportunity.

“The stories of Boston and the energy and the excitement, the way the city is, it’s something I have to experience.”

Johnson also has triathlon and swimming experience, having trained in the same pool as U.S. Olympic swimmers in Charlotte, including taking tips from London 2012 200m backstroke gold medalist Tyler Clary.

He’ll take the finisher’s medal home, where he is sure his daughters will want to play with it. It will eventually rest in his office, along with three other trophies from the Daytona 500, Brickyard 400 and a season-long championship.

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Tyler Clary eyes NASCAR after swimming at Rio Olympics

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Tyler Clary hopes to one day become a NASCAR Sprint Cup driver. He’s learning from the best.

Clary, the 2012 Olympic 200m backstroke champion, moved to Charlotte, N.C., joining the SwimMAC Carolina team in March. They happen to train at a pool where six-time Sprint Cup champion Jimmie Johnson works out.

Clary and Johnson have been exchanging advice, swim strokes for driving tips. The swimmer is so serious about it that he skipped out of the Charlotte Grand Prix meet on Saturday to hang out with Johnson in the pits and watch him compete at the All-Star Race at Charlotte Motor Speedway.

It has been a boon for Clary, a noted motorsports enthusiast with speedway driving experience who has developed a seven-year plan, according to The Associated Press. Clary, 25, wants to switch sports after the Rio Olympics and get behind the wheel in various NASCAR series before reaching the ultimate, the Sprint Cup, by 2021.

“I’m one of those guys who has a screw loose,” Clary said with a smile, according to the AP. “I’d rather go out with a big, fiery crash than slowly dying in my bed as an old guy.”

As far as swimming goes, Clary has plenty of work ahead of him to make his second Olympic Team. He’s always had to race against Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps in his best events, the 200m back and both individual medleys.

And though Lochte has dealt with injury and Phelps took 20 months off after London, there are new threats such as 20-year-old Chase Kalisz in the medleys and three-time Russian Olympic backstroker Arkady Vyatchanin, who is looking for a new country to represent, possibly the U.S.

“It was definitely a factor moving down to Charlotte that it is the heart of NASCAR,” Clary said, according to TeamUSA.org, “but swimming is what pays the bills right now so that has to take the front seat.”

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6-time NASCAR champ Jimmie Johnson talks Sochi Olympics

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Six-time and reigning NASCAR Sprint Cup Series champion Jimmie Johnson is set to begin another title defense this Sunday at the Daytona 500.

But in the lead-up to the big race, he’s also been watching as much of the Sochi Olympics as he can when not inside his No. 48 Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet.

As a regular viewer, Johnson says he’s been captivated by what he calls “the speed stuff” in this year’s Winter Games.

“The downhill, snowboarding, bobsled, the guys on the skeleton – and the girls too – they’re crazy and they’re fun to watch,” Johnson told NASCAR on NBC reporter Marty Snider.

He also noted the similarities between what bobsledders like Steven Holcomb and Elana Meyers do and what he and his own peers do at Daytona.

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“That’s probably the most similar discipline [to NASCAR],” Johnson said. “It’s propelled by them so they need to get off the start fine, but controlling the sled down the – I don’t know what they call it, the road, the track, whatever it is – it’s pretty nuts.

“They have the big banked turns like we do in NASCAR and they can touch the wall a little bit more than we can and redirect themselves, but it just looks like such a cool rush and there’s so many great stories that come from it.”

You can hear more of Johnson’s thoughts on the Olympics and on Sunday’s “Great American Race” in the video above.

And don’t forget to watch the debut episode of NASCAR AMERICA – this Monday at 5 p.m. ET on NBCSN.