jordan burroughs

United World Wrestling

Jordan Burroughs, Kyle Snyder lead U.S. wrestling team for world champs

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Olympic champions Jordan Burroughs and Kyle Snyder headline the U.S. team for the world wrestling championships in Kazakhstan in September. The team was mostly decided at qualifying events the last two weekends.

Burroughs, a 2012 Olympic gold medalist and four-time world champion, suffered a rare loss to a countryman in his best-of-three series against Isaiah Martinez but finished him off 7-1 in the rubber match in Lincoln, Neb., on Saturday. Burroughs made a ninth straight Olympic or world team.

Snyder, a 2016 Olympic champion and two-time world champion, swept Kyven Gadson in his series.

The U.S.’ other active Olympic champion, Helen Maroulis, sat out spring competition as she works her way back from shoulder surgery. She will not be at worlds, making four-time world champion Adeline Gray the headliner of the women’s freestyle team.

Three 2018 World champions in men’s freestyle found themselves in different positions. David Taylor will not defend his 86kg title due to knee surgery. Kyle Dake, the 79kg champ, has delayed his match with Alex Dieringer for the last spot on the world team due to injury. J’den Cox, the 92kg gold medalist (and an Olympic bronze medalist), swept Bo Nickal to make the world team.

The full roster:

Men’s Freestyle
57kg: Daton Fix
61kg: Tyler Graff
65kg: Zain Retherford
70kg: James Green
74kg: Jordan Burroughs
79kg: Kyle Dake or Alex Dieringer
86kg: Pat Downey
92kg: J’den Cox
97kg: Kyle Snyder
125kg: Nick Gwiazdowski

Men’s Greco-Roman
55kg: Max Nowry
60kg: Ildar Hafizov
63kg: Ryan Mango
67kg: Ellis Coleman
72kg: Raymond Bunker
77kg: Pat Smith
82kg: John Stefanowicz
87kg: Joe Rau
97kg: G’Angelo Hancock
130kg: Adam Coon

Women’s Freestyle
50kg: Whitney Conder
53kg: Sarah Hildebrandt
55kg: Jacarra Winchester
57kg: Jenna Burkert
59kg: Alli Ragan
62kg: Kayla Miracle
65kg: Forrest Molinari
68kg: Tamyra Mensah-Stock
72kg: Victoria Francis
76kg: Adeline Gray

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Jordan Burroughs reaches out to wrestler forced by referee to cut dreadlocks

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Olympic champion Jordan Burroughs offered his support to fellow New Jersey wrestler Andrew Johnson, who was forced by a referee to cut his dreadlocks in order to compete on Wednesday night.

Johnson, who is black, had a cover over his hair, but referee Alan Maloney, who is white, said that wouldn’t do.

Burroughs posted and spoke on social media early Saturday morning after researching what happened. Maloney was recommended by New Jersey’s high school athletics association not to be assigned to any events while the matter is under review.

Burroughs, a 2012 Olympic gold medalist and four-time world champion, said that Maloney was a referee for some of his matches while in high school. Burroughs’ school is 15 miles north of Johnson’s school.

“Let me tell you how sickening this is,” was tweeted from Burroughs’ account. “I’ve been wrestling for 25 years, at every level, and I have never once seen a person required to cut their hair during a match. This is nonsense. As a referee, you are required to check the hair and nails of all wrestlers BEFORE a match. My opinion is that this was a combination of an abuse of power, racism, and just plain negligence.”

Wrestlers are allowed to wear legal hair covers during matches, according to wrestling rules set by the National Federation of State High School Associations, NJ.com reports. If a wrestler’s hair in its natural state extends below the earlobe on the sides or touches the top of a normal shirt, it’s required to be secured in a hair cover.

Maloney came under fire in 2016 for using a racial slur against a black referee, according to the Courier Post newspaper. At a private gathering between officials at a condominium, Maloney allegedly poked referee Preston Hamilton, who is black, in the chest and allegedly used a racial slur during an argument over homemade wine. Hamilton slammed Maloney to the ground, according to the Courier Post.

Maloney told the newspaper he did not remember making the comments.

After Hamilton reported the incident, Maloney agreed to participate in sensitivity training and an alcohol awareness program. Maloney was to be suspended for one year for his use of the slur and Hamilton would receive the same suspension for assaulting Maloney. Both officials appealed their suspensions, which were overturned.

Burroughs said he would reach out to Johnson, calling him brave and courageous in a four-minute Instagram video:

“I didn’t want to talk about it or post anything on social until I actually was educated and knowledgeable about specifically what happened. Now that I’ve done a little bit of research, I feel like I can speak from a position in which I know what I’m talking about a little bit. …

“No. 1, Andrew Johnson, the young man that wrestled last night, congratulations on your overtime win and winning the dual for your teammate. That was a very courageous and a very brave thing that you did. … 

“The fact that with all the adversity and racism that you were facing in the moment, that you were still able to stay focused and go out there and get the W for your team, I respect that about your team.

“The fact that the parents and the coaching staff in that gymnasium allowed for you to be put in this position and didn’t protect you is absolutely shameful because although in that moment with the pressure of your peers and the dual victory on the line, I know that going out there and cutting your hair and getting your hand raised seemed like sticking it to the ref, but ultimately, you know what would have been more powerful? Walking away and saying, you know what, I’m keeping my hair. But man, I can imagine it must have been tough out there on the mat, right? …

“But it wasn’t your job. It was the parents’ job, and you guys let him down. The bottom line is this young man, especially young man in a traditionally and predominantly caucasian sport out there defenseless. You guys gotta help this young man. You’ve got to protect him. In high school, as you’re growing and you’re developing, you’re establishing who you are, you’re creating an identity. I know, as a young black man, how much my hair meant to me. And I also know, as a black man, how long it takes to grow dreads and how much discipline it takes to maintain them.

“The fact that you guys allow him to cut them matside? Look at this man after the match. He won the dual. He won the match in overtime. He showed no excitement, no exhilaration, no celebration. He just shook hands, and he walked off. That was for you guys. It wasn’t for him. So, as excited as you guys were in the stands, deep down inside he was hurting. He was hurt. And that wasn’t fair. So, Andrew, I’m sorry. Parents, come on, we’ve got to do better. Coaches, we’ve got to do better.

“As much as Andrew wanted to be the hero here, coaches, parents, adults, we have to intervene. Alan Maloney, bro, come on, you’ve got to stopped, dog. Like, you have been a referee since I was a kid. You reffed some of my matches when I was in high school, and this isn’t the first incident that you’ve had in South Jersey. I had a lot of respect for you, and I still have a lot of respect for you as a referee, but as an individual, as a man of character and integrity, there’s no way. Listen, you’ve got to step away from the stripes for a second. Put the whistle down and be a man. …

“[Maloney] can’t do this to a young dude. It’s a struggle for him. And it will be because now he’s got to go back to the crib with his head chopped. He went viral for something that he didn’t want to go viral for. Right? So now you’ve got to pay the consequences of your actions and the things that you did. 

“Basically, the bottom line is, Andrew, I’m sorry. Alan, you’ve got to be stopped. Man, you’re going to face consequences, and rightfully so. Parents and coaches, I love you guys. Continue to harbor a safe environment for this dude, right? Give him love. Give him respect. Give him honor. Encourage him. Andrew, you’re the man. I appreciate you. I’m going to be in contact with you very soon. So if you are listening to this, please send me a DM. I want to get in touch with you. I’m going to send you a few cool things for Christmas. I know it won’t help ease the pain, but hopefully it gives you a little bit of love.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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VIDEO: Kyle Snyder pinned in Rematch of the Century

David Taylor wins wrestling world title, at long last

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David Taylor, the formerly dominant NCAA wrestler known as the Magic Man, was stuck for five years.

Stuck finishing second or third in the 2013, 2014 and 2015 World Championships team trials in the U.S.’ toughest weight class owned by Jordan Burroughs. When Taylor moved up a division, he suffered the same fate in 2016 (Olympic Trials) and 2017.

At last, at 27 years old, Taylor made his first world team this summer. It helped that United World Wrestling expanded the number of weight classes from eight to 10 (still six at the Olympics), meaning Taylor didn’t have to go through Burroughs, Olympic bronze medalist J’den Cox or four-time NCAA champion Kyle Dake at trials. But Taylor earned his place, going undefeated internationally this year.

Then in Budapest on Sunday, Taylor completed a breakthrough run through the 86kg bracket, becoming a world champion.

Taylor is the oldest first-time Olympic or world champion for USA Wrestling since 2006, when now-freestyle head coach Bill Zadick did so at 33. Taylor reached the top four years after ending an NCAA career at Penn State that included two Hodge Trophies, given to the college wrestler of the year.

“I don’t know if I ever really believed if I was best in the world, for a long time,” Taylor said.

Taylor had to work from start to finish in Budapest, upsetting Iran’s Olympic and world champion Hassan Yazdani in his first match Saturday. He suffered a knee injury in his second match and said he was kicked in the face in the semifinals. He then dumped Turkey’s top-seeded Fatih Erdin in the final, scoring a two-point takedown in the first 10 seconds and getting a 12-2 tech fall.

Upon weighing in Saturday, Taylor looked at his phone screen protector and saw what he had written days before, “2018 World champion 86 kilos.” He knew the great Yazdani was first up in his bracket. It’s time, he thought.

“This flag on my shoulders, looking up, just the chills that I get when I think of that moment [of winning],” Taylor said. “To be able to earn it the way that I earned it, there’s no easy way. … I wrestled every single best guy every single round.”

The U.S. earned medals in all four weight classes with finals Sunday.

The 2012 Olympic champ Burroughs rallied for bronze, beating Cuban-born Italian nemesis Frank Chamizo via tiebreaker by scoring the last point with 26 seconds left. It’s the seventh Olympic or world medal for Burroughs in eight global tournaments, coming one day after he suffered just his seventh defeat in seven-plus years on the senior stage.

“All I thought about [after Saturday’s loss] was Rio, Rio, Rio, Rio,” Burroughs said, referencing failing to earn a medal at the 2016 Olympics. “I was thinking, well, damn, there were a lot of people who thought I quit after I lost to [Russian Aniuar] Geduev [in the Rio quarterfinals]. I’m not a quitter. I’m not a quitter. You can call me what you want, but you can never call me a quitter.”

Nick Gwiazdowski earned his second straight heavyweight bronze, winning both of his repechage matches after a Saturday loss to eventual silver medalist Deng Zhiwei of China.

In the 61kg bracket, worlds rookie Joe Colon earned a bronze medal, two weeks after replacing U.S. champion Nahshon Garrett on the team. Garrett, who beat Colon in the world team trials final in June, is out with a torn pectoral.

Cox and Dake advanced to Monday’s gold-medal matches in the 92kg and 79kg divisions, respectively.

“If it wasn’t for those guys, I wouldn’t be where I am,” Taylor said of Burroughs, Cox and Dake. “When I went up in weight class, it was for the future of my career. It wasn’t just for short-term.”

Logan Stieber, a 2016 World champion, lost his opening match at 65kg. Thomas Gilman, the 2017 World silver medalist at 57kg, lost his semifinal match and will go for bronze Monday.

Olympic champions Kyle Snyder and Helen Maroulis begin their world title defenses on Monday and Wednesday, respectively.

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