jordan burroughs

J’den Cox repeats as world wrestling champion; Kyle Snyder stunned

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If he wasn’t crowned already, it’s clear U.S. wrestling has a new king.

On a day when Rio Olympic champion Kyle Snyder was upset and London Olympic champ Jordan Burroughs rallied for another bronze medal, J’den Cox repeated as world champion in Kazakhstan.

Cox, the Rio Olympic 86kg bronze medalist, completed a perfect run through the 92kg division — not giving up a point in four matches — by dominating Iranian Alireza Karimi 4-0 in the final. He became the second U.S. man to win an Olympic or world title without surrendering a point in more than 30 years (joining Kyle Dake from last year).

“I don’t know why, but it feels like a ton better [than 2018],” said Cox, whose tattoos include one that reads in Latin, “If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell.” “I made more sacrifices … I wanted to do it better.”

Earlier Saturday, Snyder was shocked by Azerbaijan’s Sharif Sharifov 5-2 in the 97kg semifinals, denying a third straight world final between Snyder and Russian Tank Abdulrashid Sadulayev. Sharifov, the 2012 Olympic 84kg champ, clinched his first world medal in eight years.

Snyder, who in Rio became the youngest U.S. Olympic wrestling champion at age 20, failed to make an Olympic or world final for the first time in his career. He will wrestle for bronze on Sunday, while Sharifov meets Sadulayev for gold.

Burroughs earned his seventh straight world championships medal and second straight bronze. Burroughs, the 2012 Olympic 74kg champion, rebounded from losing to Russian Zaurbeck Sidakov on Friday with a 10-0 technical fall over Japanese Mao Okui.

Burroughs gave up a lead on Sidakov with 1.3 seconds left in the semifinals, a year after Sidakov overtook him as time expired in the quarterfinals.

“A lot of people in 2016 called me a quitter,” said Burroughs, who tearfully missed the medals in Rio, “and I think that after watching the amount of devastation and heartbreak that I’ve taken over the last two years and still being able to come back and take third place is a testament.”

Burroughs, 31, shares third with Adeline Gray on the U.S. list of career world wrestling championships medals, trailing only Bruce Baumgartner and Kristie Davis, who each earned nine.

Burroughs’ bronze ensured he gets a bye into the 74kg final of the Olympic trials in April. But this will be the first time he goes into an Olympic year as anything other than a reigning world champion.

“At this juncture of my career, I feel I’m running out of time,” said Burroughs, who next year will be older than any previous U.S. Olympic wrestling champion. “That can be really scary.”

Dake marched to Sunday’s final in defense of his 2018 World title at 79kg (a non-Olympic weight) by going 23-4 over three matches. Dake, who at Cornell became the only wrestler to win NCAA titles at four weight classes or without a redshirt, gets Azerbaijan’s Jabrayil Hasanov in the final, a rematch of the 2018 gold-medal match.

Next year, Dake must move up to 86kg, where Cox will likely reside, or down to 74kg, where Burroughs has won every U.S. Olympic or world trials dating to 2011. There’s also David Taylor to reckon with. Taylor won the 86kg world title last year but missed this season due to injury.

“We’ve got a guy at 79 kilos that’s going to win a world championship tomorrow,” Burroughs said, smiling, of Dake, “I’m hopefully going to be waiting for [Dake at Olympic trials], healthy and prepared.”

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Tamyra Mensah-Stock caps historic wrestling worlds for U.S. women

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Tamyra Mensah-Stock‘s first world title also marked unprecedented success for the U.S. women’s wrestling team — three gold medals at a single worlds.

Mensah-Stock, a 26-year-old who agonizingly missed the Rio Olympics, finished her march through the 68kg division by beating Olympic bronze medalist Jenny Fransson of Sweden 8-2 in the final.

She took a victory lap around the mat, carrying the American flag. Her tears didn’t stop flowing after coming down, embracing her coaches and striding into the mixed zone.

“I couldn’t control my feelings,” Mensah-Stock said. “It took about, like, 30 minutes, but I finally calmed down.”

She took out Olympic champion Sara Dosho of Japan 10-1 in the quarterfinals on Thursday as part of a 36-2 romp through the first four rounds to reach the gold-medal match.

Mensah-Stock followed world titles the last two days from countrywomen Jacarra Winchester (55kg, non-Olympic weight) and Adeline Gray (75kg, her U.S. record fifth world title). A women’s division was added to worlds in 1987, and to the Olympics in 2004, but never before had three U.S. women claimed titles at one global meet.

The U.S. earned more women’s world titles this week than any other nation, toppling power Japan one year before it hosts the Olympics.

Mensah-Stock eyes her first Olympics in 2020, despite winning the 2016 Olympic trials. When Mensah-Stock won trials, the U.S. had not yet qualified that quota spot for Rio. Mensah-Stock had three chances to clinch a U.S. Olympic spot at international tournaments, but lost in the quarterfinals, semifinals and semifinals at events where making the final would have earned her place in Rio.

“It told me that I have the potential to be great, but I still have a lot of work to do,” she said in 2017.

She endured, returning to make the 2017 World quarterfinals and the semifinals in 2018, when she came back for a bronze medal.

“Last year I fell short, and I knew I was capable of more,” she said. Her coaches did, too, repeating what her initials stood for before matches. Too Much Stamina. Too Much Speed.

This year, I proved it,” Mensah-Stock said.

Earlier Friday, four-time world champion Jordan Burroughs gave up the lead with 1.3 seconds left and lost 4-3 in the 74kg semifinals to Russian Zaurbeck Sidakov. Burroughs, a 2012 Olympic champion, will wrestle for bronze on Saturday after falling to the defending world champ Sidakov for a second straight year.

Olympic bronze medalist J’Den Cox gave up zero points en route to Saturday’s 92kg final, where he will look to repeat as world champion.

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Jordan Burroughs, Kyle Snyder lead U.S. wrestling team for world champs

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Olympic champions Jordan Burroughs and Kyle Snyder headline the U.S. team for the world wrestling championships in Kazakhstan in September. The team was mostly decided at qualifying events the last two weekends.

Burroughs, a 2012 Olympic gold medalist and four-time world champion, suffered a rare loss to a countryman in his best-of-three series against Isaiah Martinez but finished him off 7-1 in the rubber match in Lincoln, Neb., on Saturday. Burroughs made a ninth straight Olympic or world team.

Snyder, a 2016 Olympic champion and two-time world champion, swept Kyven Gadson in his series.

The U.S.’ other active Olympic champion, Helen Maroulis, sat out spring competition as she works her way back from shoulder surgery. She will not be at worlds, making four-time world champion Adeline Gray the headliner of the women’s freestyle team.

Three 2018 World champions in men’s freestyle found themselves in different positions. David Taylor will not defend his 86kg title due to knee surgery. Kyle Dake, the 79kg champ, has delayed his match with Alex Dieringer for the last spot on the world team due to injury. J’den Cox, the 92kg gold medalist (and an Olympic bronze medalist), swept Bo Nickal to make the world team.

The full roster:

Men’s Freestyle
57kg: Daton Fix
61kg: Tyler Graff
65kg: Zain Retherford
70kg: James Green
74kg: Jordan Burroughs
79kg: Kyle Dake or Alex Dieringer
86kg: Pat Downey
92kg: J’den Cox
97kg: Kyle Snyder
125kg: Nick Gwiazdowski

Men’s Greco-Roman
55kg: Max Nowry
60kg: Ildar Hafizov
63kg: Ryan Mango
67kg: Ellis Coleman
72kg: Raymond Bunker
77kg: Pat Smith
82kg: John Stefanowicz
87kg: Joe Rau
97kg: G’Angelo Hancock
130kg: Adam Coon

Women’s Freestyle
50kg: Whitney Conder
53kg: Sarah Hildebrandt
55kg: Jacarra Winchester
57kg: Jenna Burkert
59kg: Alli Ragan
62kg: Kayla Miracle
65kg: Forrest Molinari
68kg: Tamyra Mensah-Stock
72kg: Victoria Francis
76kg: Adeline Gray

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