Jordan Hasay

Brigid Kosgei shatters marathon world record in Chicago

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Kenyan Brigid Kosgei shattered a 16-year-old world record in the women’s marathon by 81 seconds, winning the Chicago Marathon in 2:14:04 on Sunday.

Brit Paula Radcliffe had held the record of 2:15:25 set at the 2003 London Marathon. Kenyan Mary Keitany holds the female-only record of 2:17:01 from the 2017 London Marathon. Both Kosgei and Radcliffe, the only women to break 2:17, ran with men in their record races.

Radcliffe’s record was the longest-standing for the men’s or women’s marathon of the last 50 years.

Kosgei did it one day after Eliud Kipchoge became the first person to run a sub-two-hour marathon in a non-record-eligible event in Vienna. She won by a gaping 6 minutes, 47 seconds over Ethiopian Ababel Yeshaneh.

Kosgei, who won Chicago in 2018 and the London Marathon in April, came in highly favored. The 25-year-old tuned up with the fastest half-marathon ever by a woman (by 23 seconds) on Sept. 8 on a non-record-eligible course.

“2:10 is possible for a lady,” Kosgei said after Sunday’s record.

Jordan Hasay, the top U.S. woman in the field, stopped after feeling a sharp hamstring strain after two miles. Hasay, who was coached by Alberto Salazar before his ban in a U.S. Anti-Doping Agency case, is one of several women in contention for the three Olympic spots at the Feb. 29 trials in Atlanta.

Kenyan Lawrence Cherono won the men’s race by one second over Ethiopian Dejene Debela in 2:05:45.

The U.S.’ top marathoner, Galen Rupp, dropped out around mile 23 after straining a calf around the sixth mile. Rupp, who was also coached by Salazar, was racing for the first time since the 2018 Chicago Marathon and Achilles surgery.

Mo Farah, the defending champion and four-time Olympic track gold medalist, finished eighth in 2:09:58. He also dropped from the leaders before the halfway point.

American Daniel Romanchuk and Swiss Manuela Schar won the wheelchair races.

Romanchuk, 21, repeated as champion. He has also won Boston London and New York City in the last year. Schar distanced decorated American Tatyana McFadden by 4:14, though McFadden did qualify for the Tokyo Paralympics with her runner-up finish (as did Romanchuk).

The fall major marathon season concludes with the New York City Marathon on Nov. 3, featuring defending champions Mary Keitany and Lelisa Desisa and 2018 Boston Marathon champion Des Linden.

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Galen Rupp to race while supporting Alberto Salazar; Chicago Marathon TV, live stream schedule

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Galen Rupp is supporting Alberto Salazar after his career-long coach was banned four years in a long-running U.S. Anti-Doping Agency case.

Rupp, who races the Chicago Marathon on Sunday, spoke out Friday for the first time since Salazar’s ban was handed down last week. The race airs live on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA and streams on NBC Sports Gold for subscribers at 8 a.m. ET.

“I have personally seen [Salazar] take great care to comply with the [World Anti-Doping Agency] Code and prevent any violations of any anti-doping rules,” Rupp said in a statement. “I understand he is appealing the decision and wish him success. From my experience, he has always done his best for his athletes and the sport. Now, I am focused on the Chicago Marathon where I will be competing for the first time without my coach and friend.”

Rupp declined comment on the specifics of Salazar’s ban for violations including possessing and trafficking testosterone while training top runners at the Nike Oregon Project.

He said he hasn’t spoken with Salazar in a professional capacity since the ban. He declined to answer when asked by LetsRun.com if he had any other contact with Salazar in that span.

“I’m focused on the race on Sunday,” Rupp said. “I’m going to deal with the coaching thing after that.”

The Oregon Project is being shut down by Nike. It was founded in 2001, around the time Salazar began converting Rupp from a high school freshman soccer player to become the U.S.’ top distance runner, a two-time Olympic medalist and 2017 Chicago Marathon champion.

“That’s Nike’s call [on shutting down NOP],” said Rupp, who wore Nike clothing at a press conference, but not the usual Oregon Project gear he’s accustomed to donning. “Obviously, I respect their decision. But that’s something that’s out of my hands.

“I will reiterate that no Oregon Project athlete has ever tested positive. They’ve never been found to use a banned substance, a banned method.”

As for the marathon itself, Rupp is a bit of an unknown.

His last race of any kind was in Chicago last year, when he dropped from the leaders around mile 19 and finished fifth. An Achilles injury flared up near the end of the 26.2 miles, and he underwent surgery later that month for two tears.

“I really haven’t been able to have the normal buildup,” he said, noting “small bumps in the road” prevented him from running a tune-up race like a half marathon. “I feel really good where I’m at now.”

Rupp remains the favorite for the Olympic trials on Feb. 29 because the U.S. lacks men who can consistently break 2:10. Rupp has done that in all four of his finished marathons in this Olympic cycle.

Rupp’s primary competition in Chicago will be Brit Mo Farah, his longtime training partner who left Salazar and the Oregon Project in 2017, citing a desire to move back home. Farah is the defending champion.

The women’s race features another Salazar-trained Oregon Project runner, Jordan Hasay. Hasay, the second-fastest U.S. female marathoner in history, said she has had no contact of any kind with Salazar since the ban.

“He’s very, very close to me, and usually the last few weeks before the marathon are really fun because he starts getting anxious and starts calling three times a day about, oh, make sure you bring your gray socks instead of white socks and this and that. Little stuff,” Hasay told media in Chicago. “I’ve been doing this long enough that I’m pretty much able to coach myself. … But just in the sense of having that mentorship there and that friendship, those last moments of advice and excitement before the race, that’s definitely been tough. I miss that.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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U.S. Olympic marathon team outlook heading toward trials

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A look at the U.S. men’s and women’s marathon rankings at the end of the spring majors with 10 months until the Olympic trials in Atlanta (NAMES IN BOLD HAVE MET IAAF STANDARD TO BE GUARANTEED ELIGIBLE FOR OLYMPICS)

Men (since 1/1/2018)
1. Galen Rupp — 2:06:07 (Prague 2018)
2. Galen Rupp — 2:06:21 (Chicago 2018)
3. Scott Fauble — 2:09:09 (Boston 2019)
4. Jared Ward — 2:09:25 (Boston 2019)
5. Elkanah Kibet — 2:11:51 (Boston 2019)
6. Jared Ward — 2:12:24 (New York City 2018)
7. Scott Fauble — 2:12:28 (New York City 2018)
8. Elkanah Kibet — 2:12:35 (Chicago 2018)
9. Augustus Maiyo — 2:12:40 (Boston 2019)
10. Shadrack Biwott — 2:12:52 (New York City 2018)

Rupp easily beat the IAAF Olympic standard time of 2:11:30 in both of his 2018 marathons, but that was before the IAAF window began on Jan. 1. The 2016 Olympic bronze medalist missed the spring marathon season after foot surgery, but if it turns out the Olympic standard is a requirement to make the Tokyo Games, he would be expected to hit it in a fall marathon or possibly at trials, though that course is hilly and could be hot. … Fauble, a former University of Portland runner who made his marathon debut in 2017, and Ward, sixth in Rio, are the only U.S. men with the IAAF standard and clearly the early favorites to join Rupp in the top three at trials. … Keep an eye on five-time Olympic track runner Bernard Lagat‘s second career marathon on July 7 in Gold Coast, Australia. Lagat, already the oldest U.S. Olympic runner in history, debuted with a 2:17:20 in New York City on Nov. 4.

Women (since 1/1/2018)
1. Amy Cragg — 2:21:42 (Tokyo 2018)
2. Emily Sisson — 2:23:08 (London 2019)
3. Kellyn Johnson — 2:24:29 (Duluth 2018)
4. Jordan Hasay — 2:25:20 (Boston 2019)
5. Sara Hall — 2:26:20 (Ottawa 2018)
6. Shalane Flanagan — 2:26:22 (New York City 2018)
7. Molly Huddle — 2:26:33 (London 2019)
8. Molly Huddle — 2:26:44 (New York City 2018)
9. Aliphine Tuliamuk — 2:26:50 (Rotterdam 2019)
10. Des Linden — 2:27:00 (Boston 2019)

The U.S. women are much deeper and stronger internationally than the men. Consider that the IAAF women’s Olympic standard time is 2:29:30, which 14 Americans have hit since the start of 2018, including six since the IAAF window began on Jan. 1. … Hasay, the top-finishing American in all three of her marathon starts (all majors), and Sisson, who just ran the second-fastest U.S. debut marathon ever, have the most momentum after the spring season. … Cragg, Flanagan, Huddle and Linden are the veteran Olympians at different stages: Cragg, 35 and the 2016 Olympic Trials winner, tops the rankings but looks like she will go more than 18 months between her last marathon and her next one. … Flanagan, 37 and the 2017 New York City Marathon winner, is undecided on whether she will resume her career after knee surgery last week. … Huddle, 34 and the greatest American distance runner ever between the 5km and half marathon, was disappointed to only PR by 11 seconds in London. … Linden, 35 and the 2018 Boston champ, hasn’t announced her plans after placing fifth in her defense, but she hasn’t been beaten by three Americans in a marathon since the 2008 Olympic Trials.

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