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Usain Bolt joins list of two-sport sprinters

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Usain Bolt is far from the first gold-medal sprinter to translate speed into another sport.

As the world’s fastest man attempts to catch on with an Australian professional soccer team, a look back at other notable Olympic speedsters who plied other trades (photo credits: Getty Images) …

Justin Gatlin, Football

The 2004 Olympic 100m champion tried out for the Houston Texans, Arizona Cardinals, New Orleans Saints and Tampa Bay Buccaneers as a wide receiver in 2006 and 2007, during his four-year doping ban, but did not sign a full contract.

“I was very green, didn’t know how to run a route at all,” Gatlin told The PostGame in 2017, adding that then-Bucs coach Jon Gruden nicknamed him “Gold Medal.” “It was serious … the guys knew that I came with some credentials and I was there to learn and take everything in.

“A lot of people think, OK, you’re fast and you’re a 100m sprinter, so you can be a wide receiver. Contrary to popular belief, a 400m runner is way more fitting for a wide receiver role. … [Play after play] it’s all about really endurance and actually governing your speed.”

Lauryn Williams, Bobsled

Bobsled has a long history of converts — from Herschel Walker to Chris Chelios — but Williams is the only athlete to earn Olympic sprint and bobsled medals.

The 2004 Olympic 100m silver medalist was inspired to try the ice sport in June 2013, when she ran into recent bobsled convert Lolo Jones at an airport.

“Why not get out there and try it?,” said Williams, who was retiring from track and field. “I didn’t really have any plans for the rest of my life.”

She was just about a natural. Ten months after hearing Jones out, Williams pushed the top U.S. sled at the Sochi Olympics, earning another silver medal with Elana Meyers Taylor.

After Sochi, Meyers Taylor picked up rugby and tried to convert Williams to a third Olympic sport, but to no avail. Williams retired from all competition in 2015.

“I fell in love with bobsled after just six months and wish I had found it sooner,” Williams said. “It really poured a refreshing sense of life into my heart, which was just what I needed at this point in my life.”

Yohan Blake, Cricket

Yohan Blake

Blake hasn’t gone pro in cricket, though he has played locally in Jamaica, famously breaking the rear windshield of a car a few weeks after becoming the joint-second fastest man of all time.

In 2014, Blake said he wanted to play for one of England’s most successful cricket clubs, Yorkshire, saying he “can bowl fast and hit the ball miles.”

“Somewhere around 26-27 I think I’ll reach my peak in athletics, so somewhere around 29-30 I want to be playing cricket,” Blake said then, according to the Guardian.

There has been considerably less cricket talk regarding Blake, who is now 28, since he returned from major hamstring injuries in 2015 and missed the individual podium at the Olympics and world championships.

Bob Hayes, Football

The only man to win an Olympic gold medal and a Super Bowl, but much more than that. “Bullet” was nearly unbeatable from 1962 through the 1964 Olympics, winning 49 straight races at one point.

At the Tokyo Games, Hayes matched the 100m world record and won by the largest margin in history at the time, then anchored the 4x100m relay to a world record, rallying with an unofficially timed 8.6-second leg (video here).

He turned to the NFL after his Olympic triumphs, like several U.S. star sprinters did in that era. Hayes revolutionized the game. When he entered the league, pass defenses were limited to man-to-man. But Hayes’ speed was too much for any defender, which led to zone defenses that have become prevalent in today’s game.

“Maybe I don’t know the fakes now, but I sure know you gotta have them, and that’s more than most pure sprinters know,” Hayes said before starting his pro football career, according to Sports Illustrated. “I’ve studied all the good flankers, and I think I can catch a ball with any of them, and I’m faster.”

He played 11 NFL seasons, breaking Dallas Cowboys records for receiving yards and touchdowns, and made three Pro Bowls. Olympic sprint medalists to follow Hayes into the NFL included Tommie Smith

Hayes died of kidney failure at age 59 in 2002 and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2009.

Marion Jones, Basketball

Jones, who was stripped of three gold medals and two bronzes from the 2000 Olympics after admitting to doping, played basketball before and after her sprint career.

As a freshman, she was the starting point guard for the University of North Carolina’s NCAA title-winning team. She played three seasons before concentrating fully on track and field, earning All-America consideration from multiple publications, and remains one of UNC’s career scoring average leaders (16.8 points per game).

Jones served six months in prison in 2008 for lying under oath about her performance-enhancing drug use and a check fraud scam.

In 2010, she signed with the WNBA’s Tulsa Shock as a 34-year-old mother of three. She averaged 2.6 points over 47 games in the 2010 and 2011 seasons.

“The biggest surprise is just how strong and just physical the ladies are. … I’m strong, but I feel like I’m easily bumped around,” Jones said in her first season. “Maybe a little of it is age.”

NBC Olympic Research and the OlyMADMen contributed to this report.

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VIDEO: Christian Coleman wins Birmingham Diamond League 100m in photo finish

Allyson Felix among sprinters to miss USATF Outdoor Championships

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Olympic gold medalists Allyson FelixJustin GatlinTori BowieLaShawn MerrittBrianna McNealKerron Clement and Dalilah Muhammad are among the stars not entered in this week’s USATF Outdoor Championships in Des Moines, Iowa.

Christian Coleman, who took 100m silver at 2017 Worlds between Gatlin and Usain Bolt, will also miss the event.

Any athlete not on the current entry list will not compete.

Big-name absences aren’t shocking this year given it is the only year in the four-year cycle without an Olympics or world championships to qualify for at nationals.

Felix, Gatlin, Bowie and Coleman have all dealt with injuries or withdrawn from international meets this spring. Merritt hasn’t raced on the Diamond League circuit this season.

Felix, the American record holder with 25 combined Olympic and world outdoor championships medals, will not race at senior nationals for the first time since 2002, when she was 16 years old.

A new generation of sprinters will headline nationals, including Noah Lyles and Michael Norman in the 200m and Sydney McLaughlin in the 400m. Phyllis Francis, the world 400m champion, is entered in the 200m. Kori Carter, the world 400m hurdles champion, is in the 100m hurdles with world-record holder Kendra Harrison.

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Justin Gatlin to miss Prefontaine Classic

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World 100m champion Justin Gatlin withdrew from Saturday’s Prefontaine Classic and a showdown with Christian Coleman.

It would have been the Americans’ first head-to-head since they went one-two in the 2017 World Championships 100m, relegating Usain Bolt to bronze in the Jamaican’s last individual race.

But Gatlin’s agent said the 36-year-old will miss the Diamond League meet in Eugene, Ore., due to right hamstring tightness picked up at a meet in Japan last weekend, according to Reuters.

Coleman, who twice broke the indoor 60m world record in the winter, also altered his Pre Classic plans.

Organizers announced Wednesday that Coleman would run the 100m and the 200m in a 90-minute span, but his management agency later tweeted he would race solely the 100m to be prudent in his first individual race meet of the outdoor season.

Gatlin and Coleman were scheduled to go head-to-head in a 100m in Shanghai on May 12, but Coleman withdrew ahead of that meet for precautionary reasons.

Gatlin went on to finish seventh in Shanghai in 10.20 seconds, his slowest professional 100m result in years, if not ever. Granted, it was raining in Shanghai and Gatlin ran into a slight headwind. Gatlin followed that effort by winning at a smaller meet in Osaka in 10.06 seconds into a headwind on Sunday.

The fastest man in the world in 2018 is American Ronnie Baker, who clocked 9.97 on April 21. Baker is in the Pre Classic 100m field with Coleman but nobody else who has broken 9.96 seconds in their careers.

Gatlin and Coleman are the world’s premier sprinters this season following the retirement of Usain BoltWayde van Niekerk‘s torn ACL and Andre De Grasse‘s slow return from a summer 2017 right hamstring strain.

Gatlin and Coleman could face off at the USATF Outdoor Championships in Des Moines in one month.

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