Lizzy Yarnold

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Lizzy Yarnold, double Olympic skeleton champion, retires

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Lizzy Yarnold, the 2014 and 2018 Olympic skeleton champion for Great Britain, has retired from the sport.

“I have lived out my dream and achieved far more than I ever thought possible in my 10 years in the sport,” Yarnold said, according to the Guardian. “but it’s time to move on. I am ready for a fresh challenge.”

Yarnold, 29, became the first Brit to earn multiple Olympic titles with her repeat gold in PyeongChang in February — and the first skeleton slider with two golds.

“At PyeongChang I didn’t want to go into the race thinking about retiring, and then afterwards I didn’t want to make the decision for the wrong reason, in rash emotion,” Yarnold said, according to the Telegraph. “So now when I’ve gone through all this rehab for the past six months [plus July back surgery], I’m retiring for the right reasons — not through injury, not for a bad competition, or any other reason but because I love the sport, and I’ve loved 10 years of it, but I think I’m ready.”

Yarnold bowing out further boosts 23-year-old German Jacqueline Lölling‘s hopes for a third straight World Cup season title and repeat world title this winter. Lölling and 30-year-old Brit Laura Deas took silver and bronze in South Korea behind Yarnold, who erased a .02 deficit to Austrian Janine Flock with a track record on her fourth and final run.

Yarnold’s chief rival leading into her first Olympics in Sochi in 2014 was the now-retired Noelle Pikus-Pace, one of the great American stories of those Games.

Yarnold dominated in Russia with the fastest run all four times down the track. Pikus-Pace, a mother of two, came out of a two-year retirement in 2012 and grabbed silver, four years after missing bronze in Vancouver by one tenth of a second.

Yarnold also earned a World Cup season title in 2014 and a world championship in 2015.

Great Britain, not a winter sports power, earned at least one medal in evrey Olympic women’s skeleton competition — Alex Coomber took bronze in 2002, Shelley Rudman silver in 2006 and Amy Williams gold in 2010.

“That feeling when you leave the changing room, walk out to the start block, with your jacket done up and your salopettes on and crash helmet in hand — a feeling of almost growing two inches taller because of being empowered, feeling in control,” Yarnold said, according to the Telegraph, “there’s something so magical about that, so I will miss that. But it’s also really tiring.”

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Germans dominate women’s skeleton at world championships

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Germans Jacqueline Loelling and Tina Hermann went one-two at the skeleton world championships at home in Koenigssee on Saturday.

Loelling, 22, prevailed by one-quarter of a second after three runs over the 2016 World champion Hermann. Lizzy Yarnold, the Sochi Olympic champion from Great Britain, was .73 back for bronze.

“I didn’t expect to win, though I had perhaps hoped a little bit,” Loelling said, according to the International Bobsled and Skeleton Federation.

The top American was Kendall Wesenberg in 13th. Full results are here.

Loelling and Hermann, 24, represent the new generation of German sliders, both seeking to become the first Olympic skeleton champion from the sliding sports power.

Hermann swept the World Cup and world championships titles last season, and Loelling can clinch this season’s double at the World Cup finale at the 2018 Olympic track in three weeks.

Yarnold, who returned this season after a one-year break, said Saturday she had head and back issues and that she couldn’t walk three weeks ago.

The world bobsled and skeleton championships conclude with the final two runs of four-man bobsled and men’s skeleton on Sunday.

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Bobsled and Skeleton World Championship moved out of Russia

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The International Bobsled and Skeleton Federation (IBSF) announced Tuesday they have decided to move the 2017 IBSF World Championship, which had been set for Sochi, Russia at the Olympic Sanki Sliding Centre from February 13-26.

In a press release the IBSF explained:

“The IBSF decided to move the IBSF World Championships 2017 from Sochi, Russia to another location which will be determined in the coming days.

The IBSF Executive Committee felt that during this difficult time it is prudent not to organize such an event in Russia. This decision was made for two primary reasons:

1st: to allow athletes and coaches from all Nations to participate in a competition that focuses on sport rather than accusations and discussions – whether justified or not.

2nd: The Russian Bobsleigh Federation has put a great effort in the preparation of the World Championships, but the current climate would make it nearly impossible to appreciate the efforts of the Organizing Committee to host a great event or the quality of the Sanki Sliding Center as one of the best tracks in the World.

Having stated that, the IBSF asks all Members and athletes for Fair Play and Respect, which also includes the assumption of innocence for any athlete, regardless of national affiliation, until proven guilty.”

This news comes after several athletes and national federations, which include the U.S., Canada, Latvia, Great Britain, South Korea, Germany and Austria, discussed boycotting the 2017 IBSF World Championships if it were held in Sochi amid the latest reports of Russia’s doping cover-up by the Independent McLaren Investigation.

With one of the sport’s most high-profile athletes, Latvia’s skeleton federation made it clear on December 11 they would boycott the event if it were not moved out of Sochi. Latvia’s best skeleton athlete, Martins Dukurs finished second in Olympic skeleton in 2010 and 2014, behind Canadian Jon Montgomery in Vancouver and Russian Alexander Tretiakov in Sochi. Great Britain’s Lizzy Yarnold, the 2014 Olympic gold medalist in women’s skeleton, has also joined the chorus of athletes wanting a change in venue.

The USOC issued a statement saying they supported an athlete’s right to choose when and where they would compete but would not go as far as to support a “blanket boycott.”

News of the change reached Team USA skeleton athlete and Sochi bronze medalist Matt Antoine as he was leaving a training session in Lake Placid, NY – site of this weekend’s World Cup event.

Antoine, reacted to the news, telling the AP, “It’s the right decision and I’m happy to see they took the proper steps. I’m sure there’s some people who are happy and some people who aren’t too happy about it. But it’s the reality of the situation. It’s an unfortunate dark cloud that’s over our sport right now. The process probably isn’t going to be clean or pretty, but this needs to be fixed.”

After meetings were held during the 2016 Rio Olympics with winter sport federations, news surfaced that any plans to hold events in Russia should be put on hold, and alternative locations should be investigated. The IOC then pivoted saying this approach should only apply to events still in the bid process. The IBSF settled on holding the 2017 World Championship in Sochi back in 2013.

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