Los Angeles 2028

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Los Angeles 2028 Olympics revised budget nearly $7 billion

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The price tag on the Los Angeles 2028 Olympics is now $6.88 billion, a $1.36 billion increase that comes mainly because of accounting measures designed to better reflect inflation over the long lead-up to those Games.

Most key numbers the organizing committee released Tuesday are essentially the same as those in the original bid documents, only adjusted from 2016 dollars to reflect the real value of the dollars at the time they’ll be received or spent — mainly in the later part of the 2020s.

That includes the cost of venue infrastructure (increase from $1.19 billion to $1.46 billion) and the contingency fund being guaranteed by the city and state ($487 million to $615 million).

If LA runs the Games without any cost overruns, it will become the first host since at least 1984 — also a year that LA hosted — to do so.

Next year’s Olympics in Tokyo originally were budgeted at $7.3 billion but are now expected to run $12.6 billion.

Los Angeles initially projected a $5.3 billion budget for its original bid for the 2024 Games. But in a groundbreaking move, the International Olympic Committee awarded the 2024 Games to Paris and the 2028 Games to Los Angeles at the same time. Part of that agreement was that LA would reveal a revised budget, for 2028 instead of 2024, in the first quarter of this year.

The revised budget does contain a three percent increase, $160 million of which is targeted toward youth sports throughout the city, and the rest earmarked to keep the organizing committee running during a lifespan that will run four years longer than initially anticipated.

The city of Los Angeles and state of California originally were projected to guarantee $250 million each for the contingency fund — with LA on the hook for the first $250 million, then the state for the rest. Those figures have been adjusted to $270 million apiece; the organizing committee has repeatedly said it doesn’t expect to need that backup.

Los Angeles is planning to host the Games without building stadiums or arenas and by using infrastructure already in place or planned.

Part of the new budget includes $200 million in projected new cash from top IOC sponsors that would come in addition to $437 million already budgeted.

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Carl Lewis looks back on LA ’84 and forward to 2028

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Summer 2019 will mark 35 years since the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

Carl Lewis, a man who spent much of his career racing the clock for world records, is still unable to believe how quickly time passes.

“It’s insane that it’s gone by that quick,” he says, chuckling. “I’m 57 and I don’t know when this happened.”

Lewis won four gold medals in Los Angeles, matching the feat Jesse Owens accomplished in 1936. For Lewis, it was the start of an exquisite Olympic career that included 10 medals (nine gold) and spanned four Games. Asked what he remembers most about L.A., Lewis reflected in a phone interview this week, “Honestly, this sounds weird, [but] I don’t remember a lot. The stress level was so high…There was no time to even stop and think about it.”

With four events on his program in L.A., a then-23-year-old Lewis started the Games with four straight days of competition, competing in the prelims and final of the 100m and long jump. On his first day off, he got a haircut. Then came the 200m final, one more day off, and two days of relay competition. At the end of it, Lewis had gold medals in the 100m, 200m, 4x100m relay and the long jump.

Lewis thought then that he’d retire in his 20s. But he continued to run with the Santa Monica track club, and after winning two more gold medals at his second Olympics in 1988, and then another two in 1992, “there [were] all these guys younger than me. I finished ’92 and said, ‘I’m still running with them, still as fast as them, so let’s just keep running until I can’t anymore. Without them, there’s absolutely no way it could’ve happened.”

At age 35, he won a final gold medal at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta in his signature event, the long jump.

“I’m the luckiest Olympian ever,” Lewis says. “My first Games were in L.A., my hometown… And my last were in my home country.”

When he looks back at his Olympic accomplishments, Lewis says the first and the last medals he won are particularly memorable.

“To come back and do that [win long jump gold in Atlanta] at that age, that one really means a lot,” he says. “The reality is if I didn’t win the 100m in L.A., it all would’ve stopped…The most endearing one was the last one but the most important one without question was the first one.”

Lewis’ last competitive season was 1997. Before the Texas Relays that year, he was waiting at home for a floral delivery and told his teammates to leave for Austin without him. He’d catch up. “I ended up waiting for my plants…and then I thought, it’s time to retire if your plants are more important,” he says.

Lewis remains involved in track and field, now as a coach. After moving back to Texas in 2013, he started working as an assistant coach at the University of Houston, his alma mater.

Lewis never thought he would coach – he had too many other things he wanted to do outside of track. But after Leroy Burrell – a longtime friend, 1992 Olympic teammate and the head coach at Houston – approached him about it, he quickly saw an opportunity to grow sprinting talent at the collegiate level to help athletes reach their full potential.

Lewis says he sometimes feels even more emotionally invested watching his athletes than he did during his own competitions. “One thing was joy, this is pride,” he says. “I really feel happy that I’m helping someone else have that experience… I’ve had more emotions, high and low, coaching than I did [as an athlete].”

Lewis no longer runs – he was never much of a jogger, he says. Instead, he rides his bike around the neighborhood and even takes trapeze and aerial silks classes. When he isn’t coaching, he is a leader of the Perfect Method, a program designed to help athletes and coaches maximize performance. He’s also plenty busy keeping up with his granddaughter, Sapphire McKinley, who is two.

When Los Angeles hosts the Olympics for the third time in 2028, Lewis could be back at the Coliseum as a coach in the same place his Olympic story began 44 years earlier.

“That’s the interesting thing,” he says. “Back in that same stadium, trying to help someone do what I did.”

Lewis will be appearing on “Undeniable with Dan Patrick” on Wednesday night.

LA mayor compares Olympic bid race to high school election (video)

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Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti considered the Olympic bid a political campaign. And of the 10 or so he has been a part of, this one was the toughest by far.

“Because you only have about 100 voters, and you have about four years of the process,” he said on the Dan Patrick Show on Friday. “It’s almost like a high school election. You have somebody over here saying, ‘I don’t like what you said to Susie at the dance, so I’m not going to vote for you.’ Or somebody else saying, ‘You’ve only had drinks with me 10 times, and Paris has done it 12 times.’

“You basically have to lay out why your city should add something to the Olympics. It’s not just what you’ll do for them, but they also want to know how the Olympics is going to change your city.”

Garcetti discussed more LA 2028-related topics in the full interview.

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