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Robb Stauber named U.S. Olympic women’s hockey head coach

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Robb Stauber, a Los Angeles Kings backup goalie in the early 1990s, will be the head coach of the U.S. Olympic women’s hockey team in PyeongChang.

Stauber took over head-coaching duties from longtime NHL defenseman Ken Klee last fall and guided the team to a world title earlier this month.

Stauber has served with the U.S. women’s program since 2010, including as an assistant to Katey Stone at the Sochi Olympics.

He is the second former NHL player to coach the U.S. Olympic women’s hockey team after Miracle on Ice star Mark Johnson in 2010.

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MORE: Knight among Olympians in documentary about gender in sports

No U.S. goalies on NHL All-Star teams one year before Olympics

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No U.S. goalies were selected for the NHL All-Star Game for the first time since 2004, but that shouldn’t significantly heighten concern for the PyeongChang Olympics (assuming the NHL participates).

The NHL All-Star rosters are here, including eight goalies (two per division).

Arguably the top three U.S. goalies are all out with significant injuries.

Jonathan Quick, who played the lion’s share of the minutes at the 2014 Olympics and 2016 World Cup of Hockey, suffered a groin injury in the Los Angeles Kings’ season opener on Oct. 12, hasn’t played since and is expected to be out at least another month.

Ben Bishop and Jimmy Howard suffered lower-body injuries in the same game Dec. 20 and haven’t played since.

Bishop, the U.S. No. 2 at the World Cup, was a Vezina Trophy finalist two of the last three seasons.

Howard, a 2014 Olympian, ranked in the top three in the league in goals-against average and save percentage for the first two months of the season.

However, healthy, primary U.S. goalies are not particularly excelling.

Among goalies with more than 20 games played this season, no Americans rank in the top 10 in the NHL in goals-against average or save percentage.

MORE: NHLPA head more optimistic than ever about 2018 Olympics

Canada’s Lou Marsh award candidates include Olympic champions

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Several Sochi Olympic champions are being considered for the Lou Marsh Trophy, awarded to Canada’s Athlete of the Year.

The award is named after the former Toronto Star sports editor and columnist. The Lou Marsh Trophy will be voted on by Canadian sports journalists on Dec. 10.

On Monday, the newspaper highlighted 14 of the athletes being considered:

Alex Bilodeau, Freestyle Skiing — Sochi Olympic moguls champion
Eugenie Bouchard, Tennis — Wimbledon finalist; Australian Open, French Open semifinalist
Jon Cornish, Football — CFL’s Most Outstanding Canadian player; 2013 Lou Marsh winner
Sidney Crosby, Hockey — NHL MVP, leading point scorer; Sochi Olympic champion
Drew Doughty, Hockey — Stanley Cup winner; Sochi Olympic champion
Justine Dufour-Lapointe, Freestyle skiing — Sochi Olympic moguls champion
Kaillie Humphries, Bobsled — Sochi Olympic champion
Mikael Kingsbury, Freestyle Skiing — Sochi Olympic silver medalist
Justin Morneau, Baseball — National League batting champion
Catharine Pendrel, Cycling — World mountain bike champion
Marie-Philip Poulin, Hockey — Sochi Olympic champion, scoring both Canada goals in the final
Milos Raonic, Tennis — Wimbledon semifinalist; ranked No. 8
Marielle Thompson, Freestyle Skiing — Sochi Olympic ski cross champion
Emma-Jayne Wilson, Horse Racing — More than 1,200 wins since 2004

Hockey is Canada’s sport, but Crosby is the only hockey player to win the Lou Marsh Trophy since Mario Lemieux in 1993. Crosby won in 2007 and 2009 (but baseball player Joey Votto won in 2010, the year Crosby scored Canada’s golden goal to win the Vancouver Olympics).

Bouchard and Raonic made Canadian tennis history this season, but neither broke through to win a Grand Slam. And it’s arguable neither has peaked yet.

From 1984 through 2008, every Lou Marsh winner in an Olympic year was an Olympic or Paralympic champion. That helps the cases for several of the listed athletes.

But, arguably the most dominant Canadian at the Sochi Olympics is not on the newspaper’s list of 14.

That’s curler Jennifer Jones, who skipped the first women’s rink to go undefeated through an Olympics, winning all 11 matches en route to the Canadian women’s first gold since 2002.

Jones’ shots for the tournament were graded at an 86 percent success rate, seven percentage points better than the next best skip. The difference between the second-best skip and the ninth-best skip was four percentage points. That gives an indication of Jones’ domination.

A curler has never won the Lou Marsh Trophy.

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