Melbourne 1956

Gary Player
Gary Player Invitational

Gary Player to return to Olympics, 60 years after meeting Jesse Owens at Melbourne Games

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BEDFORD HILLS, N.Y. — Gary Player plans to be in Rio de Janeiro for the Olympics next year as the South Africa golf team captain, and although his sport returns to the Games after a 112-year absence, it won’t be a foreign experience.

Player, who turns 80 on Nov. 1, attended the Melbourne 1956 Olympics when he was 21 years old.

There, he met Jesse Owens, the four-time Berlin 1936 Olympic champion who was at the 1956 Games as a representative of U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, according to Owens biographies.

“I was aware that Hitler would not shake his hand, which is hard to believe,” Player recalled Monday while hosting the Gary Player Invitational at GlenArbor Club, an hour outside of New York City. “But with a man like Hitler, anything was beyond one’s comprehension. I remember that, and I remember [Owens] winning, and I saw videos of him winning, and I spoke to him about these things. I was very proud to meet him and to see what he did as a start for change for the black man around the world.”

What did Owens say to Player?

“He said he tried to behave well and to show Hitler the opposite of the thoughts that he had of him, that he just tried to show him that he was well-behaved, he was a good competitor and that he had appreciation for people, which, obviously, Hitler did not have,” Player said.

In 1956, Player was embarking on one of the most impressive golf careers. He won his first professional tournament one year earlier. He played in his first Masters four months after attending the Melbourne Olympics.

“I’ve always held the Olympics in high esteem,” Player said. “It brings people of the world together. My great president, Nelson Mandela, said sport can help change the world, and that’s absolutely true. You’re getting nations that are having wars against each other suddenly competing against each other and realizing, why are we fighting each other? We should all be enjoying each other’s different systems of government and beliefs. So the Olympics are significant in my life.”

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Player’s role as South Africa Olympic golf team captain won’t be as burdensome as, say, when he was Presidents Cup captain. The South African golf team in Rio will likely consist of no more than four golfers — two men and two women.

“I suppose watching them practice and helping them tune-up a little bit with tiny little things,” Player said. “I’m not a believer in what takes place today, making significant changes in golf swings. We’ve seen how that’s hurt Tiger Woods.”

Woods dropped to No. 321 in the Official World Golf Ranking this week and is extremely unlikely to qualify for the Olympics. He would likely need to be ranked in the world top 15 on the ranking cutoff date July 11 for a shot at Rio.

Woods’ niece, Cheyenne Woods, is No. 311 in the women’s rankings this week, marking the first time she’s ranked higher than her uncle in equivalent.

“If Tiger Woods had never had a lesson after he won the U.S. Open by 15 shots [in 2000], Tiger Woods would have broken every conceivable record that ever lived,” Player said. “We need Tiger Woods to come back. Will he come back? It’s debatable. He got so mixed up with all the different coaches, and so that’s the last thing I would ever do is try and make any changes in my team. We just have discussions of being positive and having patience and enjoying the moment and being honored and grateful to be at the Olympic Games. It’s the mental, psychological help, mainly.”

Player, at 80, could become one of the oldest people to march in an Opening Ceremony, should he be allowed.

“I don’t know, what your role, if you’re entitled to do that,” Player said. “I would imagine you are. So, it’s something to look forward to.”

The rules for who may participate in the Parade of Nations have not been finalized yet, but they will likely follow the models from previous Olympics, according to the International Olympic Committee.

In London, one coach per discipline was allowed to march. In previous Olympics, six officials were allowed to march per delegation.

In either of those cases, South Africa’s Olympic Committee would decide if Player will be given the opportunity to march in the Opening Ceremony on Aug. 5.

PHOTOS: Check out the first Olympic golf course in 112 years

Ron Clarke, Olympic medalist, Melbourne 1956 cauldron lighter, dies at 78

Ron Clarke
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Ron Clarke, an Australian who set 17 middle-distance running world records, captured an Olympic bronze medal and lit the Melbourne 1956 Olympic cauldron, died at age 78 of kidney failure on Wednesday.

Clarke was 19 years old when selected to light the Olympic cauldron at the Opening Ceremony of the first Olympics hosted by Australia in 1956 (video here).

“No one ever told me why I was selected to carry the torch, but I presume it was because I’d broken so many junior world records and more importantly, I suppose, it was because I wasn’t competing in the Games themselves,” Clarke said, according to the Sydney Sun-Herald. “I was a bit disappointed about not being chosen for the team and as I’ve said many times, I would have given one thousand chances to run with the torch as to compete in the Olympics.”

Clarke’s right arm was burned and there were holes made in his shirt due to flame particles dropping from the torch he carried, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

“It was terrific being out there,” Clarke said, according to the newspaper. “I did not feel the burns at all until afterwards.”

Clarke later competed in the 1964 and 1968 Olympics, earning 10,000m bronze in the Tokyo 1964 Games. At Mexico City 1968, Clarke collapsed at the 10,000m finish, placing sixth, and nearly died from altitude sickness, according to the Associated Press.

“There was, instead, the awful sight of the great Australian distance runner, Ron Clarke, gray as dust, an oxygen mask pressed to his face as he lay unconscious by the track for 10 minutes after the 10,000 meters on the first day of competition,” Sports Illustrated wrote. “Everybody knew Mexico City was 7,349 feet high and that there was this crazy thing called ‘oxygen debt.'”

He set world records in distances ranging from two miles to the one-hour race, according to OlympStats.com and is one of the greatest athletes never to win an Olympic gold medal.

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