Millrose Games

Kejelcha sprints for home in Wanamaker Mile win, misses world record by .02

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Ethiopia’s Yomif Kejelcha, a two-time indoor world champion in the mile, nearly broke the 22-year-old world record for the event, running the 112th NYRR Millrose Games’ Wanamaker Mile in a time of 3 minutes 48.46 seconds. He came up just .02 hundredths of a second short of setting a new world record.

Kejelcha broke his own world lead record which he set two weeks ago with a time of 3:51.70 at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix, just three seconds behind the world record (3:48.45) set by Morocco’s Hicham El Guerrouj in March of 1997. 

Today, Kejelcha’s race was one against the clock, with his closest competitor, Kenya’s Edward Cheserek finishing more than five seconds back. The U.S.’ Clayton Murphy finished third.

Full results are here.

A scary scene unfolded in the men’s 3000m when Jamaican pace setter Kemoy Campbell collapsed onto the infield as he led the competitors around the track. Paramedics treated Campbell trackside, eventually moving him from The Armory on a stretcher. No official word of his condition was made available.

Campbell competed at the 2016 Rio Olympics, finishing 25th overall in the men’s 5000m.

Matthew Centrowitz beaten at Millrose Games; American records fall

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NEW YORK — Olympic 1500m champion Matthew Centrowitz felt heavy and sluggish. Rio teammates Courtney Okolo and Ajee’ Wilson were anything but, breaking American records at the Millrose Games on Saturday evening.

Centrowitz, who in Rio became the first American to win an Olympic 1500m since 1908, finished seventh in a two-mile race at the historic indoor meet in Manhattan. He never challenged for the lead in an event won by veteran Ben True.

“I felt pretty heavy; I felt pretty sluggish,” Centrowitz said. “I think it was maybe 4:08, 4:09 at the mile, and it felt like we were going a lot faster than that.”

Afterward, Centrowitz’s coach, three-time New York City Marathon winner Alberto Salazar, told the runner that he might have worked him too hard in training the last week.

“I’m not out of shape,” said Centrowitz, who clocked 8:21.07 after winning the mile race at Millrose the previous two years. “Maybe coming back from Rio, or maybe I’m sort of tired from the workouts in my legs the past week and a half.”

Meanwhile, True clocked 8:11:33 to notch one of the biggest wins of his career and complete a unique New York trifecta. In 2015, True became the first American man to win a Diamond League 5000m, at the Adidas Grand Prix in New York. He also won the 2015 Healthy Kidney 5K road race in Central Park.

“It’s something special,” said True, a Maine native. “I’m a New England and a Boston fan for cities, but I’ve had some incredible luck down here in New York City for races.”

Full Millrose Games results are here. Americans are preparing for the U.S. Indoor Championships in three weeks (with coverage on NBC Sports).

In other Millrose events, U.S. Olympians Okolo and Wilson broke the American indoor records in the 500m and 800m, respectively.

American Eric Jenkins and the Netherlands’ Sifan Hassan won the meet’s prestigious mile races.

In the pole vault, Greece’s Katerina Stefanidi held off American Sandi Morris to repeat their Rio one-two finish.

Shaunae Miller, the Bahamian who dived at the finish line and beat Allyson Felix in the Olympic 400m, won the women’s 300m against a field that included U.S. Olympians Ashley SpencerNatasha Hastings and Sydney McLaughlin. Miller then said she still hopes to race both the 200m and the 400m at the world championships in London this summer.

In the 60m hurdles, Olympic champion Omar McLeod of Jamaica prevailed in his first competition since Sept. 1. McLeod said one of his goals this year is to enter the same 100m race as countryman Usain Bolt for the first time. McLeod’s personal best in the 100m is 9.99 seconds.

Canadian Olympian Phylicia George won the women’s 60m hurdles, edging American Sharika Nelvis.

Rio long jump gold medalists Jeff Henderson and Tianna Bartoletta each finished sixth in 60m sprints won by Dezerea Bryant and Clayton Vaughn.

MORE: Centrowitz comes to New York for Millrose, dad’s tattoo

Matthew Centrowitz comes to New York for Millrose Games, dad’s tattoo

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NEW YORK — Matthew Centrowitz has his gold medal. Soon, his dad will be wearing one for the rest of his life, too.

Last summer, Centrowitz’s father, Matt Centrowitz, told his son out of the blue that if he won a medal in the Rio Olympic 1500m, he might get a tattoo to commemorate it. And if he won gold, he would definitely get inked.

Six months later, the promise is expected to be fulfilled in Manhattan.

Centrowitz is in New York as one of 12 Olympic champions and 57 Olympians competing in the Millrose Games, the most-ever in the event’s history dating to 1908.

The Millrose Games will air on NBC, NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app on Saturday from 4-6 p.m. ET.

When Centrowitz won surprise gold in Rio, he became the first American to do so in the Olympic 1500m since 1908. His father and sister both screamed in the stands. Centrowitz did an NBC broadcast interview shirtless, showing off his chest tattoo, “Like father like son.”

Centrowitz got that tattoo about three years ago, during a six-week stretch when he couldn’t exercise due to pericarditis, an inflammation of the lining surrounding the heart with heart-attack-like symptoms.

“I was kind of freaking out, this is it for me,” Centrowitz thought. “I’m going to die. I was like, you know what, screw it, I’m going to get a tattoo. I just wanted something to symbolize our relationship.”

The Centrowitz men share so much. They’re both two-time Olympians who majored in sociology in college. Matt raced in the first round of the 1976 Olympic 1500m and would have competed in Moscow in 1980 if not for the boycott.

When Centrowitz decided he would get a tattoo, he asked his dad for suggestions.

“He was like, ugh, that’s not my taste,” Centrowitz said. “My generation, we never did stuff like that. … He always jokes, a Hallmark card would have been just fine.”

It just came to Centrowitz one day to go with “Like father like son,” which was actually the headline of a 2007 New York Times story about the runner while he was in high school.

Centrowitz revealed the tattoo on Instagram, ending the post with an apology to his mother.

Centrowitz’s dad, a New York native, was scheduled to get his first tattoo on Friday afternoon in Manhattan, but a scheduling problem may delay it. The design is of Christ the Redeemer holding a gold medal, which will go on a shoulder.

“It’s to honor my son’s gold medal. It’s a tribute to him,” said Matt Centrowitz, who recently published a book, aptly titled “Like Father, Like Son,” about his life as an Olympic runner, NCAA track coach and parent of an Olympian. “I promised it a little hastily, and then, of course, he got a gold medal. There was no choice. Whenever he wanted to cash in his win, I’m ready. Today he wants to do it.”

The 62-year-old said he was half-anticipating, half-dreading sitting down in the artist’s chair.

“I just don’t want to cry,” he joked.

Neither Centrowitz has any immediate plans to get another tattoo.

“Yeah, they’re addicting, but not for a while,” Matthew Centrowitz said. “My mom would kill me.”

Matt Centrowitz added that he would only get another tattoo if his son wins another gold medal. That’s possible, as the 27-year-old has said he could race through the 2024 Olympics.

Matthew Centrowitz’s first tattoo was the word “CITIUS” on the back of his shoulder. It’s the Greek word for “faster,” and the first word of the Olympic motto, “Citius, Altius, Fortius” (Faster, Higher, Stronger).

The elder Centrowitz was at first disgusted with the “Like father like son” tattoo but quickly got over it. He has texted his son to send him a picture of it to share with his friends. He has asked Matthew to lift his shirt in public to show strangers.

Over Christmas break, Matthew Centrowitz hosted a young runner, Cam Sorter, who created social media buzz last year for getting a tattoo of Centrowitz’s upper body on the back of his left shoulder. They spent a day working out together at Centrowitz’s base in Portland, Ore.

Sorter, a college runner, has gone on to have a strong indoor season. Centrowitz would like to believe it was inspired.

“Maybe everybody should get tattoos of me on them,” Centrowitz said.

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