NASCAR

Jimmie Johnson just misses Boston Marathon goal, eyes return

1 Comment

BOSTON — When Jimmie Johnson arrived in Boston for his first marathon, running less than two days after Saturday’s 400-mile NASCAR race, one of Meb Keflezighi‘s books was waiting in his hotel room, signed by the 2014 Boston Marathon champion himself.

When Johnson finished his first marathon in 3 hours, 9 minutes, 7 seconds on Monday, there was Keflezighi again. This time to present the seven-time NASCAR Cup champion his finisher’s medal.

“He congratulated me, was impressed with my time for a first-time marathoner,” said Johnson, who got into Boston via a Gatorade sponsor’s exemption but has run a 1:33 half marathon. “I invited [Keflezighi] to a car race, would love to connect with him and host him and show him what our world’s like at the race track.”

Johnson may be seeing Keflezighi again next year. The 43-year-old noted his time beat the 2020 Boston Marathon qualifying standard by 53 seconds for his age group.

“I would love to be able to try to break three [hours],” Johnson said 45 minutes after crossing the Boylston Street finish line, repeating his pre-race goal time. “I know for a fact it wasn’t in the cards today. I left on that number and was trying to hold it and just didn’t have it. I need to go back to the drawing board. I love that kind of challenge, and it’s going to weigh on me. … I just need to look at the schedule and see if it all lays out, and I can come back.”

Johnson said the transition from Saturday’s NASCAR race in Richmond, where he placed 12th, to the world’s oldest annual marathon was smooth. He felt strong on the starting line, though admitting the buzz of the Hopkinton start drained some energy.

“I couldn’t believe how many people did spot me,” he said. “It was loud, especially the closer we got to town. Once somebody would recognize me, the crowd would get going, and I could kind of egg them on.”

Johnson, wearing bib 4848 to correspond to his No. 48 Chevrolet, did get bragging rights over former NASCAR driver Jamie McMurray, who ran a 3:14 marathon in December.

“It’s always been of interest to me, endurance sports,” Johnson told NBC Sports before the race. “The year of the bombings, I realized that if the NASCAR schedule is right, with the marathon on a Monday, it’s something I can do. It just took from the year of the bombings until now for the opportunity.

“The stories of Boston and the energy and the excitement, the way the city is, it’s something I have to experience.”

Johnson also has triathlon and swimming experience, having trained in the same pool as U.S. Olympic swimmers in Charlotte, including taking tips from London 2012 200m backstroke gold medalist Tyler Clary.

He’ll take the finisher’s medal home, where he is sure his daughters will want to play with it. It will eventually rest in his office, along with three other trophies from the Daytona 500, Brickyard 400 and a season-long championship.

MORE: Shalane Flanagan may need surgery, starts post-racing career

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

[twitter-follow screen_name=’nbcolympictalk’ show_count=’yes’ text_color=’00ccff’]

Dale Earnhardt Jr. to cover Super Bowl LII, Olympics for NBC

Charles Sykes/Bravo
1 Comment

Dale Earnhardt Jr. will cover Super Bowl LII and the PyeongChang Olympics as a contributor for NBC.

Earnhardt will spend the first weekend in February covering the outdoor activities in Minneapolis for the Super Bowl Pre-Game Show (NBC, Feb. 4).

Then he will travel to South Korea for the Winter Games.

From NBC Sports PR:

“Earnhardt will travel to PyeongChang, where he will explore the culture, people, and traditions in South Korea, and experience Olympic competitions first hand. Earnhardt will visit the speed skating venue at Gangneung Ice Arena, and through the lens of a racer will view the speed, close contact, and tight turns on the short track speed skating oval, which so closely mirror Earnhardt’s racing days and nights at Bristol Motor Speedway.

Following a recent invite on social media from his new friends on the U.S. bobsled team, including U.S. bobsled team pilot Nick Cunningham, Earnhardt will also travel to Alpensia Sliding Center, where he will test the true speed of the bobsled track and live out his post-retirement dream of riding in an Olympic bobsled.”

Earnhardt, 43, retired last year after 19 NASCAR seasons, which included Daytona 500 wins in 2004 and 2014.

He is now a NASCAR on NBC analyst.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Breakdown of NBC Olympics record 2,400 hours of programming

[twitter-follow screen_name=’nzaccardi’ show_count=’yes’ text_color=’00ccff’]

Ato Boldon to bring fresh eyes to NASCAR

Getty Images
Leave a comment

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Ato Boldon likes speed. And cars. NASCAR? Well, the four-time Olympic medalist is about to find out.

The retired Olympic sprinter and NBC Olympic analyst will join NBC Sports Group’s NASCAR broadcast team as a features contributor beginning next week. His NASCAR on NBC debut will be July 1 during coverage at Daytona International Speedway.

It’s going to be an eye-opening experience for Boldon, who in an interview with The Associated Press admitted he could name “maybe 10” NASCAR drivers. When asked to list them, he came up with three: the late Dale Earnhardt, Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Jeff Burton, the retired driver and current NBC analyst.

Sam Flood, executive producer for NBC’s NASCAR telecasts, isn’t worried.

“Ato is a curious guy and I want someone who loves cars, but is also from a different sports world,” Flood said. “I want a fish out of water to show what NASCAR is all about.”

Boldon joined NBC Sports Group in 2007 and is now the network’s lead track and field analyst. He represented Trinidad and Tobago in the Olympics and is a four-time medalist in the 100 meters and 200 meters.

It was during his coverage of last year’s Olympics in Rio that Boldon first expressed curiously about NASCAR to Flood. The producer had Boldon attend the November season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway.

At Daytona next week, Boldon will report on what makes NASCAR fans loyal to their drivers while hanging out in the track infield. He will also examine NASCAR’s earlier days of racing on Daytona Beach.

“I don’t think until you have been in a (race) car, you understand how difficult it is,” Boldon said. “People go, ‘Oh, yeah, big deal, they drive fast and they turn left. I do that every day on my commute.’ But I don’t think people get a sense of how difficult it is. I went around that track with Jeff Burton and there was so much going on, just to keep that car wheels down and to keep it off the wall. I couldn’t imagine doing that with another 30 cars, competing for space.

“It really created an appreciation, and the same thing I say about my sport, ‘The pros make it look easy,’ and it is not.”

Boldon loves cars, but has become an environmentalist and given up gasoline-fueled cars. He has made the full transition to driving electric cars, which meant turning in a Porsche for a Tesla four years ago.

The only cars he currently owns are electric, and Boldon is a little nervous that the attraction to the sights and sounds of NASCAR might lead him into a dealership to check out a $200,000 McLaren 570S he’s been eyeing.

“I feel like I am going to be around these NASCAR races, and the sound is half of the thrill, and I’m going to go out and buy something that completely does not make financial sense in any way,” Boldon said.

Boldon will also report from Bristol Motor Speedway, Charlotte Motor Speedway and Homestead. NBC plans to use him as a hauler driver, a member of Joe Gibbs Racing’s pit crew and will give him the wheel of NBC Sports’ on-track car to experience the horsepower and track banking.

“My hope is that people who never really thought of themselves as NASCAR fans will get something from my exposure to it. I am going in there completely wide-eyes and completely open to all possibilities,” Boldon said.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

VIDEO: Usain Bolt’s last race in Jamaica

[twitter-follow screen_name=’nbcolympictalk’ show_count=’yes’ text_color=’00ccff’]