New York Marathon

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Des Linden follows Boston Marathon win with New York City Marathon

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Des Linden will follow her breakthrough Boston Marathon win by racing her second New York City Marathon on Nov. 4.

“Breaking the tape at this year’s Boston Marathon was a lifelong dream come true,” Linden said in a New York Road Runners press release. “At the moment, it felt like it was the culmination of my career, but I believe I still have plenty more to give to the marathon. I’m thrilled to head to the TCS New York City Marathon this fall. I’m motivated to get back on the big stage that NYRR will undoubtedly put together and intend to make a name for myself in another great city.”

Linden, a two-time Olympian, became the first U.S. female runner to win the Boston Marathon in 33 years on April 16.

The 34-year-old navigated the world’s oldest annual marathon’s most dreadful weather in at least 30 years. High 30s at the Hopkinton start. Headwinds of 20 mph. A downpour.

Now she’ll look to make it two straight U.S. women to win in New York after Shalane Flanagan in 2017. Linden was fifth in her previous New York start in 2014, the last time she raced a fall marathon.

Flanagan, 36 and a four-time Olympian, has not announced whether she will defend her title, but she will at least be coaching 95 recreational runners/beer lovers who will be given spots on the Staten Island start line through Michelob Ultra.

The last female runner to win Boston and New York City in the same year was Norwegian Ingrid Kristiansen in 1989. The last American runner (male or female) to pull off the double was Alberto Salazar in 1982, before Boston started awarding prize money and the elite international fields became dominated by East Africans.

MORE: Boston winner has run 80 marathons, half marathon as panda

New York City Marathon celebrity results

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NEW YORK — Three Olympic champions ran the New York City Marathon on Sunday, but none of them won their gold medals in strictly running events.

Gwen Jorgensen, the Olympic triathlon champion who was unhappy with her 26.2-mile debut, was joined by race-walking stars Robert Korzeniowski of Poland and Jared Tallent of Australia.

They weren’t the only non-running Olympians in the field.

Retired Spanish soccer star Raul played at the 1996 Atlanta Games as a 19-year-old, before gaining his first senior national-team cap.

The top 10 results for men and women are here.

Full searchable results are here.

MORE: Records set, U.S. drought ends at NYC Marathon

Name Profession Time
Sean Astin Actor 6:02:33
Tiki Barber Retired NFL player 4:28:26
Marion Bartoli Retired tennis player 5:40:04
Richard Blais Chef 4:47:16
Cynthia Erivo Actress 3:57:07
Jax American Idol finalist 5:17:37
Andy Katz Journalist 5:10:25
Robert Korzeniowski Olympic champion race walker 2:47:53
George Mendes Chef 4:19:27
Lee Pace Actor 4:44:02
Raul Retired soccer player 3:26:05
Will Reeve Son of Christopher Reeve 4:36:15
Theo Rossi Actor 3:35:48
Sam Ryan TV sportscaster 4:31:53
Nev Schulman TV personality 3:21:58
Jared Tallent Olympic champion race walker 3:43:14
Mary Wittenburg Former NYRR CEO 3:41:09

Gwen Jorgensen unhappy with New York City Marathon result

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NEW YORK — Olympic triathlon champion Gwen Jorgensen had no expectations for her first marathon, but this much she knew about her race Sunday:

“I don’t know what I would have been happy with, but I’m not happy with that race,” she said.

Jorgensen crossed the New York City Marathon finish line in Central Park in 2 hours, 41 minutes, 1 second. She was 14th in the women’s field. Race results are here.

The former University of Wisconsin cross-country runner stayed with the lead pack for the first five miles before dropping back. Jorgensen really slowed in Central Park, failing to break seven minutes each of her last two miles.

That’s not shocking, given Jorgensen primarily stuck to her triathlon training going into this race. Last weekend, she competed in a three-day triathlon stage race in the Bahamas (and won).

“I didn’t prepare as well as I should have,” she said. “I just didn’t have enough time. It was difficult. My muscles definitely got sore during the race. They’re going to be pretty tired and sore for several days. That’s different than a triathlon. Normally, I go into a triathlon, and I’m fully prepared and ready to go. For this race, I wasn’t prepared, and it definitely hurts.”

Jorgensen beat elite runners, including recent track Olympians Kim Conley and Janet Bawcom.

Don’t expect to see Jorgensen run another marathon any time soon. In addition to eyeing defending her Olympic triathlon title in Tokyo, she wants to start a family, which would entail taking a year off from competition.

“We’ll see what happens,” she said. “We failed on month one, and now we’re on month two. I’m running this marathon probably isn’t going to help a baby stick. So we’ll see.”

MORE: Meb Keflezighi sets final marathon